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Meds Help Please

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by TracyC, Mar 24, 2016.

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  1. TracyC

    TracyC Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I went to the doctors because i was so thirsty and was subjected to a number of blood tests, the most recent was 18.7 which I'm told is high. I was due to go see the Diabetic nurse this morning but my little girl is off school poorly so was unable to make it. I phoned to cancel, but I got a call this afternoon saying that the new blood tests results were now back ( I don't know the results ) but that I need to start on medication immediately ( my doctor had told me that I would be able to control my diabetes with diet alone ) The nurse who called told me I needed to take one in the morning for the first two days then take 1 in the morning and 1 at tea time after meals. Its called Metformin the prescription I have been given.

    She asked me if i smoke, I do but i am down to maybe 2 a day, sometimes none...and she said that the tablets might make me feel sick. This is where my panic sets in. I have an extreme fear of vomiting, its not just the case that I don't like it ..for me its absolute terror I experiance. Its been so bad in the past that when my children have been sick ( I cant cope with others being sick either ) Ive literally been close to moving out ( have a very understanding husband thank goodness! ) .

    So my question is ...do I HAVE to take this medication? If I absolutely have to take it is there anything i can do to stop myself being sick potentially, maybe anti-sickness pills? and is there another medication I could take instead that doesn't have that side effect. Im prepared to put up with any other side effects...Im fine with headaches, getting the runs etc ( sorry! ) . Im sure a lot of people will read this and think i should be more focused on the diabetes than the effects of the medication but until I know I 100% won't throw up I cant even bring myself to think about it. Many thanks in advance! Tracy x
     
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  2. Alzebra

    Alzebra Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Tracy, welcome to the forum. You don't have to take anything you don't want to take and there are certainly ways to manage T2 by diet alone. But Metformin is a good drug and although it can cause a bit of nausea I don't think many people actually vomit with it. Having the runs is fairly common though!! If you try it and find it causes problems you can ask to be switched to a slow-release version of the drug which is kinder to your tummy.
    I'm tagging @daisy1 for her newbie guide to T2 and in the meantime I highly recommend you have a look at our low carb forum. I changed to a low carb way of eating a year ago and can't begin to tell you how much better I feel!! Ask plenty of questions, we're here to help :)
     
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  3. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Most people find that Metformin makes them sick...er....the other way (down not up).

    To answer your question, no, there is no requirement for you to take the medication as you're an adult and you can make your own decisions.

    However, if your blood glucose levels are frequently reaching the levels you mentioned, that is something that you realistically need to fear. Controlled diabetes is not something to fear. Uncontrolled diabetes absolutely is.

    Is it possible for you to seek help in addressing the phobia you mentioned? It's really important that you address your physical and mental health issues as quickly as possible. Plus, trying to quit your smoking habit as well. Smoking and diabetes is a very bad combination.
     
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  4. TracyC

    TracyC Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for replying.. I am using a vaporiser now for the most part rather than using cigarettes, 2016 has been an exceptionally stressful year and the death of a close relative had me reaching for the cigarettes again, like i said 1 day usually but its daft because I know I can stop that, and I will.

    I do understand uncontrolled diabetes is serious and my phobia is extreme and irrational, yes I am getting help for that with anxiety therapy that starts next week. In the meantime I am going to go to the walk in clinic the doctors run here tomorrow to ask if they have anything they can give me ( such as anti sickness medications ) that would at least minimise my chances of being sick. And hopefully discuss alternative meds. I will be happy to give up carbs and sugar in a heartbeat right now if they could just allow me to try that before these medications.

    I haven't seen the diabetic nurse yet as I missed the appointment today so I'm not sure if they give you anything to use to test your blood sugar but i have just seen the type2 test program on here and think I might go ahead with that! Right now Im looking around websites for food ideas, carbs are a big part of my diet right now so thats going to be difficult but I'm up for the challenge! I have read a lot of people can completely reverse their type 2 diabetes by diet alone, fingers crossed for that!
     
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  5. TracyC

    TracyC Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you, I will definitely take a look at that. Carbs are a huge part of my diet right now so will be a change for sure but one i am happy to make if it means I'm less likely to get complications ( and have to take the pesky pills! ) and whilst I don't relish the thought of getting the runs I can cope with that. Have been reading through the website and forum here, and I'm guessing its going to become a regular thing for me now. I'm grateful that I am able to ask questions and read other peoples experiences, feel far less lost now! x
     
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  6. joe-90

    joe-90 · Well-Known Member

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    If you are lucky, Metformin will change your world and put you back in charge of your eating. 3 months ago I was pigging out on 5 - 6 K calories per day. I started taking the pesky pills and now eat around 1200 cals per day. I've lost 17 kilos without even trying. Give them a whirl.
     
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  7. Alzebra

    Alzebra Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It took me a couple of years (and a warning that I had early signs of eye damage) to overcome my denial, it sounds to me like you've got your head round things much quicker than I did! I was addicted to carbs when I was diagnosed and thought giving up bread, chips, rice, pasta, fruit etc would be the end of the world. I can honestly say that after a couple of weeks the cravings were gone, my blood sugar levels had plummeted and I felt in control of my eating for the first time in a decade. One year on, I've lost over 8 stones, come off the metformin and can exercise again!
     
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  8. TracyC

    TracyC Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Fruit? haha...ok Im not as with it as I thought obviously! I had gone out and bought fruit tonight for grazing on ( instead of the usual chocolates / crips ) So is fruit a definite no no then? I was running this time last year and stopped in November, I do think that is something I will be taking up again, even though I have put on heaps of weight since I stopped and the embarrassment of being seen wobbling down the road is not much fun, its still better than getting ill from the complications of this condition I have been reading about. I have a problem with the heel of my foot right now, no idea why, it just hurts on weight bareing, hopefully not related to the diabetes ...but once I see a doctor and get that resolved I will be running. I don't think its a case of I've got my head around it quickly more to do with I have always been half expecting it, my grandmother had type 2 so did my dad, I'm 44 now and carrying weight around my middle, the week I began to get thirsty I just knew. But wow...8 stone, god I will would be so happy, seriously well done, fantastic! Ok, so now you've lost the weight have you reversed the diabetes or do you still have to monitor your bloods etc?
     
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  9. TracyC

    TracyC Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Aye, I am trying to look at it like that. As the kick up the butt I have needed. You've clearly done brilliantly, do you still have to take the meds. I guess Im a bit confused about that aspect of it, if once you get healthy and your eating well and lost the weight has the diabetes gone then? or is it an ongoing thing?
     
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  10. Alzebra

    Alzebra Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    There are lots of threads discussing reversal / remission and I think it is a very individual thing. I can have the odd higher carb meal now and then without any lasting impact on my blood sugar (red wine with the meal helps lower my bg, how lucky is that!!) but I choose to stay low carb for the vast majority of the time since I feel much healthier like this. I'm 41 and not built for running but I have recently begun walking regularly and can now manage 5 miles quite easily.
    Some fruits are high in carbs, and everyone reacts differently. I can manage small servings of berries but not tropical fruits like banana or pineapple. I bought a meter and tested A LOT in the early stages to find out what I can and can't tolerate...
     
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  11. joe-90

    joe-90 · Well-Known Member

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    I had a banana and went for a walk tonight. When I got back my bg was 4.5 - my lowest ever. Diabetes is a very personal disease. You have to find out what suits you.
     
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  12. fluffy123

    fluffy123 Type 2 · Member

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    I too have an irrational fear of vomiting!! I've been on metformin for 5 weeks now and while there has been plenty of "digestive distress" (love how they try to describe it in a pleasant manner!) I've not once vomited. I'm low carbing and still adjusting to everything, have days where I feel very odd, days when I feel great and some just in between. I'm still petrified half the time but am dealing with it head on!
     
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  13. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @TracyC - Hello and Welcome to the Forum. Twinings Ginger and Lemon Tea is good for nausea - give it a try, it works for me.:)
     
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  14. TracyC

    TracyC Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ahh thats fantastic! Made me feel a lot better reading this! Glad you're coping, and yes I think I've spent all my spare time since being diagnosed looking at ways I can give up the carbs realistically. I have experienced up and down days where my health is concerned before the diagnosis so thats not going to change then lol. I'm hoping I will have a success story to add to this forum this time next year. I think I'm just starting the menopause too, the Dr doesn't want to run the blood tests for that until the Diabetes is stable which is annoying but he thinks some of my symptoms might be from that and not necessarily the menopause so I guess that makes sense. Planning to stay indoors for the first week on these tablets, I start them tomorrow ( thankfully I work from home so easier ) and I will update how I am dealing with them! Thank you for your reply, from one vomit phobic to another, it means a lot!
     
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  15. TracyC

    TracyC Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Liam! Will pick some up, happy to try anything. No sugar I take it?.. it's ok to use sweeteners? I have Splenda here, but isn't that made with sugar, wow it gets complicated.
     
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  16. ladybird64

    ladybird64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  17. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @TracyC

    Hello Tracy and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful, especially the diet advice. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    LOW CARB PROGRAM:
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/low carb program


    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
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  18. amgrundy

    amgrundy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes I can certainly agree with what you have just said.
     
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  19. amgrundy

    amgrundy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi TracyC I can symphasise with you on the sickness issue. I have always had a fear of being sick its horrendous I know. Now back to the Metformin 500mg I have been on these since Jan this year, started 1 daily for first week then increased to 2 second week. Never ever been or felt sick just a bloated feeling and indigestion, changed a few weeks ago to the SR ones [ slow release] and I am fine now. Started with a reading of 19.3 now into single numbers mainly 5s and 6s. lost almost 1and a half stone. On the LCHF diet, I do eat the Lidl high protein rolls and Burgen Linseed and Soya bread in moderation. Go onto the forum " What Have You Eaten Today " a brilliant forum and you can see what we all eat for meals, we are all different what one can tolerate the other can not, try for yourself then test 2hrs after your meals and you will soon see what is ok for you. As for fruit some can some cant eat certain fruits, luckily I can eat pears / plums and raspberries strawberries and red water melon in small portions. Good luck stay with this site someone will always answer and give you lots of advice and support.:)
     
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  20. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @TracyC - Hello again. I am sat with the box of Twinings Ginger & Lemon T-Bags in front of me and it says NO ADDED SUGAR, Caffeine Free and the contents are all natural ingredients. I drink it with 1 splenda sweetener in and an additional slice of lemon added. It works for me as I take iron tablets daily for Aneamia and drinking this tea stops the nausea. :)
     
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