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Mother shares pain of losing her son following misdiagnosis of diabetes

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by DCUK NewsBot, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. DCUK NewsBot

    DCUK NewsBot · Well-Known Member

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    The mother of a five-year-old boy, who died shortly after receiving a misdiagnosis of type 1 diabetes, has spoken out about the mistakes. Diabetes.co.uk has previously reported a number of times in which a child has died following a misdiagnosis in which they were not diagnosed correctly with type 1 diabetes. In Shay's case, the inquest heard that Shay had sepsis and not type 1 diabetes. His mother Laura Turner told the Daily Mirror: "The family have been left devastated, destroyed, heartbroken by the loss of Shay. We relive every moment of his death and it's left a huge void in our hearts." An inquest into the death of Shay Turner in Doncaster heard that he was admitted to Rotherham General Hospital on 30 March last year when he was unable to keep any water down and was repeatedly vomiting. Shay showed signs of high blood glucose and was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Following the diagnosis, a further key error occurred as Shay was administered ten times the intended dose of insulin by accident. On 2 April, a scan revealed that Shay had suffered a severe brain injury and the difficult decision was made to not keep Shay alive. The coroner’s report stated that Shay did not have diabetes and died of a bowel infection leading to sepsis (infection of the blood). The report noted Hirschsprung disease as a possible cause of the infection. Hirschsprung disease is a condition which can prevent digested food matter passing through the bowel properly. The family of Shay are contending that the insulin overdose was the cause of Shay's death. Mother Laura added: "I have to know whether the amount of insulin caused or contributed to his death, which I believe it did. He was in a compromised position and therefore was less likely to cope with the overdose." Consultant forensic neuropathologist Dr Daniel du Plessis told the inquest that he believed it was unlikely that Shay's death had been caused by the insulin. He said: "I have no doubt that there was an excess of insulin given but it would appear that it was not long enough and severe enough to cause significant brain damage. There was no evidence the brain damage was a result of an over-dosage of insulin." A spokesperson for Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust, said: "Our thoughts and sympathies are very much with Shay's family and our medical director has recently written to them about the serious incident investigation which we are currently undertaking." A further inquest into Shay's death is scheduled to take place in October. Picture credit: SWNS / Mirror

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  2. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    10 times the dose of insulin to someone that doesn't have diabetes didn't help lead to his death?
    That's so much bull.
     
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  3. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    What a horrendous outcome....

    The wording is interesting.... Consultant forensic neuropathologist Dr Daniel du Plessis told the inquest that he believed it was unlikely that Shay's death had been caused by the insulin. He said: "I have no doubt that there was an excess of insulin given but it would appear that it was not long enough and severe enough to cause significant brain damage. There was no evidence the brain damage was a result of an over-dosage of insulin."

    He had been given 10 times the INTENDED dose.... this implies to me that there was a huge mistake in dosing for someone who doesn't have diabetes in the first place. The consultant states he had no doubt there was an excess. This seems to be worded to make it sound not as bad as it was, an excess, it was 10 times the intended dose. I know which one sounds more damaging to me.

    There is a lot of info missing in this story still, but I don't like the way they are trying to play down the severity of the negligence that is imo at the center of what happened. It must also be noted that for those who made these mistakes, they are most likely having a very hard time also. There are two sides this tragedy.
     
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  4. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    All they seem to be doing is skirting around the issue. A young child has lost their life, my heart goes out to the parents, it's shocking :(
     
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  5. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    What a truly horrific tragedy.
     
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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    We are losing consultants who do know what they're doing.
    Loss of knowledge, experience to ALL.

    I have to say this is very very sad and avoidable. Argh!!!! :( :( :(
     
  7. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Tragic and heart rending.
    I wonder if other expert witnesses and asked about the effect of sepsis AND insulin overdose on a young child's brain function.
    I wonder if someone in an expert role could conceivably say that an insulin overdose did not cause brain damage (by itself).
    But unless questioned closely might not reveal the thought in parentheses above. I am only playing devil's advocate here !!
     
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