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Neglect ruled in inquest over type 1 teenager death

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by DCUK NewsBot, Sep 12, 2019.

  1. DCUK NewsBot

    DCUK NewsBot · Well-Known Member

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    The death of a teenager with type 1 diabetes, who died after a GP misdiagnosis, was caused by neglect, a coroner has ruled. Rosie Umney, from Herne Bay, died last year from complications of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA); a condition caused by a lack of sufficient insulin and often presenting alongside high blood glucose levels. Rosie's GP, Dr Sadaf Mangi, had seen her and diagnosed an ear infection instead of DKA. In the events leading up to the sad passing, Rosie had complained to her grandfather that she felt unwell. Later that day, the 15-year-old began hyperventilating, was sick and complained of a pain in her side. Her mother and grandmother took her straight to the GP for an emergency appointment, but stated to the GP that her glucose levels were normal. Dr Sadaf Mangi carried out an examination, noted a heart rate of 140 beats per minute and prescribed treatment for an ear infection. That night, Rosie sadly passed away. Speaking at a recent inquest over Rosie's death in Canterbury, assistant coroner James Dillon said that Dr Mangi failed to follow National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Guidance to primary care staff is that, if people are short of breath, are sick and have high temperature, they should be referred to hospital. Speaking at the inquest, Rosie's granddad Michael Umney said: "I was amazed because I was sure she was going to say to go to hospital. "I said to Georgia [Rosie's mother], I didn't feel happy about what Dr Mangi had diagnosed." Dr Mangi has admitted she had dismissed DKA because Rosie's mother had stated that her blood glucose levels had been normal. Dr Mangi admitted she did not know the correct procedure to follow when a young person with type 1 diabetes presents with the symptoms that Rosie did. In a statement to the family, Dr Mangi said: "I wanted to pass my condolences and apologise to the family of Rosie Umney. "I would like to say to the family I deeply regret I fell short of my responsibilities as a GP. I whole-heartedly apologise." Picture credit: Mirror

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  2. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's easy to criticise I know and I am full of admiration for what these busy Drs do but good grief! Sounds like the Dr didn't so much as do her own glucose check on the girl. So tragic., It's not as if type 1 diabetes is some obscure condition.
     
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  3. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If you're ill, you can develop DKA with normal blood sugars. You need to check your ketones when unwell.
     
  4. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That's tragic, I would have been on the same boat if all my doctors just kept issuing antibiotics for me to consume. One doctor had the audacity to tell my mum that I looked fine. But my mum was like "she is losing weight and not eating much, what do you mean she looks fine?" Another doctor said it sounds like diabetes and did a quick urine test for ketones then told my mum "take her to hospital NOW". I am fortune I am one of the lucky ones, I guess any longer I wouldn't be here. What I will say those is at first glance it doesn't seem obvious and it's like you're showing flu like symptoms. But then again, with today's technology, a simple blood test and blood ketone test isn't difficult to quickly diagnosis someone.
     
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  5. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    and in this case they already knew the poor girl was a type 1 diabetic which is even worse.
     
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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Very sad situation. Luckily noted as rare neglect.
    I guess anyone can get something wrong when rushed and overloaded with patients. I'm sure regret all round.
    Everyone is human. Safeguards are used to double check the most important risks to life.
    So i sincerely hope "lessons hv been learnt".
     
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