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New and I want to cry

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by diabolic sister, Mar 19, 2013.

  1. diabolic sister

    diabolic sister LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Hello I'm Jan, This is a brilliant site, I've been lurking for a while and now I'm taking the plunge.
    I'm newly diagnosed with Type 2, and I am lost. This is day 4 post diagnosis.
    I'm on Metformin 500mg /day, which I've forgotten to take this morning, :( so I hope it doesn't matter if it's not taken until this evening.
    I haven't got a clue as to what I can and can't eat. The GP just said 'avoid sugary things and eat healthily'. I'm not overweight and eat healthily already, I have borrowed a glucose monitor from work for now. I started out at 22.2 and it will go down to a fasting 13.9 but whizzes back up to the 20s after meals. My eyes are so blurry now that I'm wearing my driving glasses to see the monitor.
    I have yet to go to a Diabetic clinic and don't have an appointment until 28th March, so I'm a bit lost. There is so much info on the web it's actually quite baffling.
    Someone brought a cake to share into work today, it was beautiful but I only had a strawberry off the top and I still am not sure if I should have had that!
    Can anyone direct me to a 'Words Of One Syllable Dead Easy To Understand What I Can Eat' web site Please :?
     
  2. bernie.freeman

    bernie.freeman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    Welcome to the forum, we all understand how baffled you must feel. There is an awful lot of support here and also a lot of information. Daisy will be along soon to post the information given to newly diagnosed diabetics. Try to follow the guidelines in the information and your numbers will come down.

    Try not to worry too much, and take each day as it comes.

    Bernie :)
     
  3. izzzi

    izzzi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jan, :) welcome to the forum,

    You will soon get lots of help on this forum,

    I have been type2 for 9 months now and I get great satisfaction and help from reading many threads on this Forum.

    You will get good ideas from a very friendly bunch,"mind you a few odd balls about"

    Good health and enjoy new friends on this nice forum.

    Roy, :)
     
  4. Ellie61

    Ellie61 · Newbie

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    Hi Jan I'm Sue and this is also my first post, but I had to answer you and send a virtual hug. I was diagnosed 18 mths ago and I'm still confused as what is best etc but I am learning and you will too. Like you I have been a forum lurker but the one thing I have learnt is that people on here do care and someone will be along with more specific advice. If you need a cry then cry it's one heck of a diagnosis and takes some getting used to but you will get there. Take care.


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  5. MCMLXXIII

    MCMLXXIII Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  6. diabolic sister

    diabolic sister LADA · Well-Known Member

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    What a warm welcome. Thank you x
     
  7. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hello and welcome :wave:

    Best wishes RRB
     
  8. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    Hi Jan and welcome to the forum :)

    Here is the information we give to new members, mentioned by Bernie. Ask all the questions you need to and someone will help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find well over 30,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes ... rains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips
    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  9. diabolic sister

    diabolic sister LADA · Well-Known Member

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  10. anjum62

    anjum62 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi Diabolic sister

    My name is Anjum and I was diagnosed type 2, six years ago and I too wanted to cry and was in denial for 6 months. When I got control of myself I sat down with my doctor and talked at great length, Whilst I am of reasonable weight and always ate well and healthily my genetics kicked in as I am from a very heavy diabetic family. I controlled my diabetes with exercise and diet and lost more weight but I sadly had to succumb to medication last year when my levels were not so good in the mornings. I now take a 850mg of Metformin every evening and that has stabilised my levels. My levels on diagnosis was 9.

    My suggestion to you as a newly diagnosed diabetic is to take matters in your own hand and kill the ******. Reverse it, if you can. You can do it. Lose weight and hit the gym or run like hell everyday and get in shape, I have read that you need to exercise for 20 mins a day plus change your diet. You mention a level of 17.5 which is actually quite high already therefore you will have to work double hard. Try the Okra soaked in water and drink the liquid thereof. This will help. Sometimes it is better to go on medication because it protects your organs.

    As you are new to this you will become overwhelmed but there is a lot of support out there. Take care of yourself.

    Two contradicting facts but good luck and dont worry, you are not alone. And dont for a second think that you induced it upon yourself. There are many reasons why a person can become diabetic.

    Lots of love
     
  11. BobCornelius

    BobCornelius · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jan, Welcome aboard!

    You will find lots of information, and friendly people on here!

    Yes it's a confusing condition, but you can get in control of it!

    :)

    Bob
     
  12. Luapecir

    Luapecir · Newbie

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    Hello four five years is me four injections daily injections, and in addition have never typed into a forum before ever.
    Got no idea really. However what I do know is that Diabetes is in your body, not your head. The quicker you understand that the food you eat the Better off you will be. Have your glasses on when you shop. Read the labels, cakes can be fine but they have to be fairly sugar free. If something spikes your blood, forget it, which is in your head, as is your mouth. :!: I spent years trying to get on top of this thing. All the one syllable words will do nothing. I assume that one day you learnt to ride a bike, not touch electricity, and drive a motor car, all of which are far more complex activities, than what we eat. You are the only human out of the 7 billion+ of us, who can make a difference to you Diabetes. More specifically Food Groups and Low GI foods is quite possibly the most important piece of understanding, you may need. This site as opposed to this forum, is as good as it gets. Hope I may help. Paul
     
  13. Andy12345

    Andy12345 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi, welcome :) I know how you feel, I suspect we all do, it's ok! This isn't the end of the world.
    Good luck ! Read read read :)
     
  14. lifesway

    lifesway · Member

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    Hi I'm newly diagnosed too I wasn't sure I'd get through the first days I was so upset the people on here are brilliant gave me confidence . I know exactly what you mean it's hard to know what is best to eat. I'm obviously no expert learning myself too but there is a thread "breakfast" on this forum which will help you sort that one out. I've cut out cakes pastries biscuits sweets that's a start. I've lost half a stone in 3 weeks too. wish I'd realised how easy that was to lose. Mind you I'm still not sure if it's me losing weight or my diabetes either way I'm getting lighter which must be better. I never used to eat at midday used to go till the evening without anything I learnt I should eat at dinner time too even just an apple at dinner seems to help stops me feeling so hungry when it comes to teatime which is when I always eat my main meal of the day.I've cut out all meats but chicken and fish until I learn what is best.
    I'm not advising you to do the same but I've learnt already that these are safe foods to eat.Don't cry I did and do too but we have everyday for the rest of our lives to live .HUGS :)
     
  15. Mini40

    Mini40 · Member

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    Hi Diabolic Sister

    I agree with Anjum. Like her, my family is seeped in the illness. I am of South Asian descent, so even though I wasn't massively overweight, my BMI was OBESE in terms of BMI index for South Asians. Even though, I have brought it down to almost 24, I am still officially overweight. The difference the weight loss has made to my readings, is incredible. So, I too will say, diet and hit the gym. You can at least bring yourself to a point of decreasing the medication or just getting your readings down. I follow a very low carb and calorie diet. It works for me and moves the focus away from being diabetic to being in control of my health.

    Regards,
    M x
     
  16. mrawfell

    mrawfell · Well-Known Member

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    Firstly try to accept it and don't fight it. It is a fact. I am T2 diagnosed about 3 years ago. Try to avoid obviously sweet things but also high starch foods. Your body readily converts starch into glucose ( sugar ). So you need to avoid, white bread, potatoes, white rice. Wholemeal products are much better as the conversion of starch into sugar is slower, but the same final quantity. So increase your vegies, cut out white bread and potatoes, including chips. Wholemeal bread in low quantities is fine. I enjoy my food now more than before, no more bland fillers. So every cloud has a silver lining. Mt last HbA1c was 4.
    Vildaglytin 50 mg
    Glucofarge XR 750 mg.
     
  17. diabolic sister

    diabolic sister LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Whoo I've cut out carbs massively and just had a reading of 8.8 though I am just about to eat ratatouille and brown rice and I've not really eaten very much today. Fingers crossed its still lowered after dinner. I know I am probably doing it all wrong but its a step in the right direction. Better than starting bg of 22.2
    Should this be in different area of the forum? I don't know, there are so many topics. The doctor wants to put me on 1gm metformin but I think I'll persevere a bit longer. Cheers for all the replies.
     
  18. MattyK

    MattyK · Well-Known Member

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    Hey diabolic!

    I am type 1 and use a great app on my iPhone called 'carbs and cals' it gives a guide of what most popular foods contain Eg. Carbs, fats etc. it may help you to understand what foods may raise your sugars.
    It also give an understanding of ingredients for when you cook your own dishes.

    I hope it helps!

    We're here if you need anything!

    Matt


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  19. Michael-Rollett

    Michael-Rollett · Member

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    It takes a while to really understand what is good and what isn't. I never really cared about the carb, cals, sugars in foods! When diagnosed I thought skip sugary foods and just eat things like potatoes and pasta, how wrong was I. The app carbs and cals is amazing, get the paid for version it's more equipt and you can't go wrong!


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  20. lrw60

    lrw60 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jan,
    My name is Lee and I have 4 diabolic sisters! When I was diagnosed several years ago the doctor told me I should go home and phone them immediately to tell them to get checked. If I had it, they had it. Three of them did, one didn't. I have put a few posts on this forum in the past week, search for lrw60 or Lee and you should find them. If not have a look under the Type 2 section. The reason I want you to look is that my diabetes has gone.
    Lee
     
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