1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

New diagnosis

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Michelle135, May 15, 2021.

  1. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

    Messages:
    18,403
    Likes Received:
    12,250
    Trophy Points:
    298
    But it's to your benefit to get an accurate diagnosis.
    Maybe remind them of that small fact...
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  2. TashT1

    TashT1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    311
    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I can usually go & get bloods done at the hospital. You could check if that’s an option. I did a urine c-peptide which I was advised to eat 2hrs before hand. Came back at 1.6ug so def T1
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Carl40

    Carl40 Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    39
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Definitely. Don't mind if the result is the same - think the certainty will make a difference to how things are going forwards.

    Thanks..
     
  4. Carl40

    Carl40 Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    39
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Thanks.. never had that option but am waiting a call back from the nurse on an unrelated matter.. will see what she says when she calls. Hospital would be fine for me.
     
  5. Krystyna23040

    Krystyna23040 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,081
    Likes Received:
    8,002
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Yes, it is a great forum.
    For me the long term negative was that as a T2 I was insulin resistant so injecting more insulin was actually making the insulin resistance worse and it became harder to control blood sugars. On top of that, even with all the insulin I was injecting, I began to get neuropathy in my right foot. Mild at first and then it gradually became more and more numb. So from low risk of amputation to medium risk and then well on the way to high risk.

    Eyes went from absolutely fine at the beginning of the 4 years on insulin to not very fine and needing injections into my eyes to save my sight. I was actually in a very bad place when I found this forum.

    Moving onto low carb and being able to ditch the insulin has resulted in a right foot again becoming low risk and eyes not at risk anymore.

    Cutting the carbs was hard for me at the beginning but I watched the Panorama programme which really scared me as I had no idea that so many T2s had foot amputations. I would queue up to get my coffee at Costa Coffee, next to the rows and rows of sweet treats, and would repeat a mantra in my head. I would ask myself what do I want - eat the carbs or keep my eyes and feet. Eyes and feet always won. I think I brainwashed myself because I look at carbs now and think Yuk Yuk Yuk.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    #45 Krystyna23040, May 17, 2021 at 4:18 PM
    Last edited: May 17, 2021
  6. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,502
    Likes Received:
    2,721
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Assuming you are type 2 and producing high levels of your own insulin

    The extra injected insulin is currently getting your bgl down. However you will have extra high circulating insulin as a result of this and your own production.

    Hyperinsulemia in and of itself is a problem, even when it is controlling bgl. In fact it’s how most type 2 begins. The body needs more and more insulin to successfully regulate normal bgl. Insulin resistance increases (in part at least to the cells being bathed in insulin) and more is needed etc until eventually it no longer achieves its goal and bgl begin to rise despite you pumping out all that insulin. Adding more insulin by injection controls the bgl but adds to the insulin resistance and the problems potentially caused by hyperinsulemia.
    • Higher triglyceride levels.
    • High uric acid.
    • Hardening of the arteries (artherosclerosis)
    • Weight gain and obesity
    • Hypertension
    • Coronary heart disease
    • Cardiovascular

    There are studies about how medication whilst apparently maintaining adequate bgl does not prevent the complications of type 2 diabetes. In part at least due to increasing insulin resistance over time for the above reasons and also partly unambitious targets.

    Obviously it’s entirely your own (informed) decision but this is why I chose to manage it by addressing the underlying problems of hyperinsulemia and insulin resistance first and foremost and only using medication if or when this fails in addition to lifestyle choices - not instead of them.

    My parting shot is many that now happily and successfully low carb believed they’d never give them up or be miserable doing so and have been very pleasantly surprised. Once you step off that glucose rollercoaster and feel the benefits of better bgl, better weight management, improved bp, better sleep, more mental clarity, lack of hunger pangs etc etc it can be quite a powerful motivator. Then you have the excitement of learning about new foods and ways of preparing them that many that did little more than nuke a ready meal find they actually really enjoy. Have a look in the success stories thread and you’ll see what I mean.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. SallyJess

    SallyJess · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hi , I’m exactly the same as you... I’ve had the call to tell my blood test has shown I’m “ on the cusp” of type 2... nurse them left it there and I’m seeing her Friday..... I really don’t know what I’m going to be told from there ....
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook