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New mum w/ glucose intolerance that didn't go away post gestational diabetes

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by himma1, Apr 10, 2020.

  1. himma1

    himma1 Prediabetes · Member

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    Hello! I'm new to this forum so please bear with me. I'm wanting to connect with mums who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy and the diabetes didn't "go away" immediately after birth of their baby.

    A little background... I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 28 weeks (first pregnancy). Healthy baby was born at 3.17kg at 40wks+6 and my GD was managed with diet and exercise. Having no family history with anyone who has type 2, a normal BMI and normal hba1c (pre and post pregnancy), I was told by everyone that I don't have to worry and that the glucose intolerance would go away once baby is born. 6 weeks post partum, I went back to take the GTT and had results at the 2hr mark that puts me in the "diabetic" range. That said, my hba1c and fasting glucose are both in the normal non-diabetic range, so they are calling me "prediabetic" for now. I am currently waiting to meet with an endocrinologist to get a 2nd opinion as my primary care physician didn't seem overly concerned and just told me not to bother testing my sugars and just do another hba1c in 6 months.

    I have been having a really hard time coming to terms with this and given everything that comes with becoming a new mum, losing the freedom to eat whatever I want and the daunting thoughts that come with whether or not I will be living long enough (without complications) to see my son grow up, it has put me in a rather depressive state with a lot of anxiety. I don't have more weight to lose (otherwise I'd be underweight) and I often wonder if I will eventually be insulin dependent, given I am receiving this diagnosis at the age of 33.

    I am trying my best to be extremely strict with my diet (not that I was eating unhealthily before) but I do get very emotional and sad when I see family being able to have sushi, a bowl of pasta, or that piece of chocolate without a second thought. I often find myself feeling extremely guilty these days when I have things like fruit or a slice of bread even though I know I can technically have foods in moderation. Food has been a huge passion and love of mine and I feel like that has been ripped from me overnight with this new reality.

    Anyway, that's a bit of an essay. Would love to connect with other moms as it's been a challenge to find others in a similar circumstance. Thanks!
     
  2. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and I am glad that you have started your own thread.

    You need to be gentle with yourself- this time for new mums is really tough. You have this new human being who is totally dependant on you- who you love but also who is a huge responsibility. Your body is going through a whole lot of hormonal changes and you are probably not getting enough sleep. Now you combine that with the way the world is at the moment. Then add on a diagnosis that is pretty devastating at any time. No wonder you are having a tough time coming to terms with it all.

    It is difficult to contemplate life without being able to eat some of your favourite foods without thinking about it.

    It may be just that your body's hormone haven't settled down so while you wait to see the specialist it won't hurt to go lower carb. But it may be that you are not diabetic.

    Tke care of yourself and let us know how it goes with the specialist.
     
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  3. AngieKali

    AngieKali · Newbie

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    Hi there, firstly congrats on becoming a new mama!! Your post really hit home with me as I come from a family who has struggled with diabetes (dad, uncle and grandmother), I was petrified that I might get GD too, I’ve just had my 2nd child, am slightly overweight- could def shift a few pounds, ( really wish I had the energy and the time to work out/run like I used to but realistically since having kids, I don’t!?) love healthy food and generally do well eating, and like you adore sushi, the odd cake/ brownie etc. But the thought of having to manage watching what I’m eating on top of having a 2 year old and a 6 month old baby is daunting.

    I just want to say ‘chin up’ you are doing an amazing job bringing a new life into this world and sustaining him. I agree with @VashtiB wait to hear from the Endocrinologist and hormones are all over the place and your likely feeling more anxious than usual with having to be up to feed every few hours. Perhaps speaking to hubby/ partner or friend for support/ comfort. Sometimes a hug and a cup of tea does wonders! (Even virtual)

    My dr. Did say that the best thing to do was to try to avoid being diabetic in the first place- manage with diet and exercise, for the time being perhaps set aside a few hours to put together a low carb menu? That could give you a handle on when and how much of what you can eat. Sorry I can’t be of more help. But I just wanted you to know that you have support either way.
    Good luck with the results. I hope it all works out for you. Big Hug!!! :)
     
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  4. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    First of all, congratulations!
    Secondly, I'm a bloke!
    Third, what has intrigued me, is your results from your hba1c and OGTT.

    I'm non diabetic, my hba1c and fasting tests are in the normal range.
    But I'm glucose intolerant, if I had a two hours OGTT, my results would match yours!
    I'm not saying it is RH or another type of condition that would give you those results.
    Only tests can do that, so if the symptoms persist and your next lot of results are the same, you do need a referral to a specialist in these types of conditions.
    I was misdiagnosed prediabetic then T2.

    I have read a few research papers, were symptoms of reactive hypoglycaemia persist in some women after birth. Mostly diagnosed with gestational diabetes.

    Or I have got this totally wrong!

    Do you test?
    Because the best way to get a referral is by keeping a food diary and recording everything, so that your health care providers can see that something other than prediabetes is going on.

    Best wishes
     
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  5. himma1

    himma1 Prediabetes · Member

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    Hi @Lamont D ! Thanks for responding and super happy to connect with blokes (not just mums) too. I was extremely confused as well by the conflicting data, given my fasting and hba1c were normal! When you say RH, what does that mean exactly? I would've thought this is more reactive hyPERglycemia instead of hypo... but I may be understanding you incorrectly. Did you do the OGTT? Also, curious as to what you do to manage RH?

    I've been pricking my fingers and eating super low carb given I got a glucometer when they diagnosed me with GD during pregnancy. But I see that I spike after meals (which all people do) but other than that nothing out of the ordinary.

    You've got me intrigued! Would love to hear more.
     
    #5 himma1, Apr 10, 2020 at 7:37 PM
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
  6. himma1

    himma1 Prediabetes · Member

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    Thank you so much @VashtiB for your kind response. I think I've been extremely critical of myself with this even though I know it's nothing I did personally. And you're right, the way the world is at the moment is not helping with any of this and anxiety levels have been on overdrive.

    I am currently on low carb and will be seeing the specialist later this month for a 2nd opinion. I just want to know what I need to do (ie. should I be testing obsessively, eating barely any carbs when I am borderline underweight). Hopefully it will help me come to terms with things with a less gloomy outlook. Stay healthy!
     
  7. himma1

    himma1 Prediabetes · Member

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    Hi @AngieKali thanks for your response and for the support. It definitely helps to speak to someone about it but I've often found that people tend to over simply the issue and go oh but diabetes is so common, I wouldn't worry too much about it. That's the part that frustrates me because there was nothing that put me at the "high risk" category prior to my GD diagnosis. And to make things worse, everyone told me it would go away after baby is born and it didn't! So all of that wrapped up with the shift in identity in becoming a new mum did take a huge toll on me mentally.

    I am now extremely careful with my diet with low carbs and have been trying to exercise daily (but not to overdo it since I can't lose more weight!). You're doing the best you can too with your kids! Mine is about to turn 6 mths as well :). Time flies and I'm trying my best to enjoy it.
     
  8. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @himma1

    If cutting carbs remember to up protein and fats- so have double cream in your coffee- have some more cheese etc. You need to be having enough to eat as breastfeeding can really take it out of you.

    Take care and let us know how it goes
     
  9. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    RH is reactive hypoglycaemia, which basically means that the symptoms you are getting are atypical high blood glucose levels shortly after eating, then your pancreas reacts by sending too much insulin to drive your blood glucose levels down quickly.
    You probably don't go hypo, but the symptoms are similar, as well as the same as a false hypo. Fluctuating bloods would also give those symptoms.
    Yes I have had six eOGTTs, an extended glucose tolerance test is five hours long to see if you go hypo after the glucose sends your blood levels high quickly, it takes longer than the two hours in a regular OGTT.
    My specialist recognised my symptoms, after a couple of visits, he had me doing tests to get the diagnosis.
    I am very choosy what I eat because I'm so intolerant to so many foods, I eat very low carb. Any carbs are not recommended for me. Even the so called healthy complex carbs triggers the reaction. Mostly protein (carnivore) and some vegetables (mainly salad), lots of eggs, some good saturated fats with my food.
    It surprising the hidden carbs and sugars in our food especially production foods. Fresh food is recommended with small pieces of fruit throughout the day, as long as you can tolerate it. Potatoes are my worst results, even a small new potato sends me up to mid teens from normal within half an hour!

    It is really important that you test properly and record the results and what you eat and how much you eat.

    Best wishes
     
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