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New Type 1 Diabetic

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by MisplacedIdentity, Dec 15, 2018.

  1. FUD

    FUD Type 1 · Active Member

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    Wow, sounds like a nightmare to start with. What I have found is general doctors are pretty clueless when it comes to diabetes. The specialist nurses are very good however. At first I was told to stick to an exact regime eatingexacting the same thing at the same time and injecting the same amount. I got on a DAFNE course in Salisbury with the team there and it changes everything. It just teaches you to carry on doing whatever you want and adjust accordingly. Good luck
     
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  2. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Expert
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    You will get back to your old self soon. Getting out and about a bit will help, even if it a walk round the block. You'll soon be taught carb counting which will give you more freedom on food and flexibility to eat when you like.
    Hope the new meter is the same type as your NHS one or you'll spend a fortune on test strips!
     
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  3. Alison54321

    Alison54321 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That was a bit of an adventure. Just one thing I want to say that no one else has, and that's that this really isn't your fault, you haven't done anything to cause it.

    There has been a lot of publicity about diabetes in recent years that suggests that type 2 diabetes is caused by eating too many carbs, and being overweight. This can sometimes be the case, but some people with type 2 diabetes just have a gene that makes them insulin resistant.

    Type 1 diabetes is about your beta cell no longer producing sufficient insulin, it's often an autoimmune thing, but not always, but it's not something you've done wrong, so please don't blame yourself.

    You well learn how to manage, it's a bit of a steep learning curve, especially at first, but it will get easier. So have a good Christmas, and please don't feel guilty.
     
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  4. hodders

    hodders Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there.
    I eas diagnosed in my 50's. And my whole experience very much mirrors your own. Apart from the fact that I had paid over £400 for two pairs of glasses that I never really wore . I had symptoms that got entangled truly with the menopause. So went along with it until it all came crashing down around my ears. I like you wore 3.5 specs just to get through my day at work for about 2 months after type 1 diagnosis. Once my sugars had stabilised all glasses including those I had spent a fortune on became totally unnecessary and now I don't wear any. I too spent days I'm hosp with all the drips etc. And nurses asking me how long I had been type 1 to which I replied I didn't know I was.
    Less rambling. Hang on in there it will get much easier.
    There are lots who know just how you feel.
    Take care and good luck.
     
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  5. MisplacedIdentity

    MisplacedIdentity · Well-Known Member

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    The new meter is exactly the same, it's set up and connected to diasend too. I have been refereed to a local group for guidance and training but when they called and found out I was still under the hospital they were unable to offer me the support. Once I'm released from the hospital I can apply to join the local group! seems bonkers but never mind.
     
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  6. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Expert
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  7. MisplacedIdentity

    MisplacedIdentity · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your reassurance, I seem to have gained some control but now having hypos instead of hypers so need to introduce snacks in between meals which is annoying as I cut them all out before being diagnosed in order to lose weight. Still have blurred vision too so time to book an opticians appointment. Need to get back to driving so I can return back to work soon.
     
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  8. MisplacedIdentity

    MisplacedIdentity · Well-Known Member

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    I did thank you, the diabetic team helped me to plan my dosage to match my meal for yesterday and I managed to stay within my levels. Just need the blurred vision to improve so I can return back to driving and work next week.

    Missing the gym and swimming, not confident enough to go out for a walk on my own due to poor vision but will get active again soon. Cabin fever almost set in but spent time with family. Mom in law is out of hospital and on the road to recovery so no longer stressing about her health.

    Looking forward to another feast later today and starting on metformin tomorrow, not really sure why as the consultant has confused me! He now thinks I might be type 2 but will carry on treating me as type 1 because my keytones have improved and I'm not having as many hypers as I should be having as a type 1........... feels like 1 step forward and 10 steps backwards again but will do as I'm told and carry on.

    Normality will return eventually!
     
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  9. MisplacedIdentity

    MisplacedIdentity · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for sharing your experience, I'll keep plodding on with the 3.5 glasses though walking with them on makes me dizzy, driving would be impossible too for now. I'm not tearful anymore just frustrated as no driving means no working but I'll get back to it soon.
     
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  10. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Expert
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    That does sound confusing - ask consultant to explain logic and what the plan is for support if your numbers rise again without insulin.
    If you need lots of snacks without excercise then could be honeymoon period, or wrong insulin ratio or yes t2 as consultant suggests. Are they running gas and c-peptide tests?
     
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  11. MisplacedIdentity

    MisplacedIdentity · Well-Known Member

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    No idea what gas and c-peptide tests are sorry.

    For the past 8 days my routine has been as follows:
    breakfast - finger prick test, 3 units novarapid, 1 x 500g meformin.
    Lunch - finger prick test, 5 units novarapid
    Dinner - finger pick test, 5 units novarapid
    Night - finger prick test 9 units levemir which was 13 but was reduced by the diabetic team over the phone.

    I've been waking up with BS between 5 and 7
    By lunch it's around 3.4 and 4.1
    By dinner its around 6.5 and 7.5
    By night it's around 5.3 and 8.1

    Tomorrow I start on metformin with my evening meal for a week then with my lunch for a week, presuming I reduce my insulin but need to call the diabetic team tomorrow to ask before I change anything.
     
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  12. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Expert
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    That should have said Gad not gas, it's an antibody test that can indicate t1. C-peptide shows levels of insulin produced.
    Glad you have contact with your team and they can support you through changes.
     
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  13. MisplacedIdentity

    MisplacedIdentity · Well-Known Member

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    had bloods taken 3 times whilst in hospital but no idea what they showed as my folder was lost when I transferred wards. The consultant was going to send me for more last week be changed his mind. I'm presuming I'll have bloods done in the new year but waiting for another appointment to come through with the consultant again.
     
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  14. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @MisplacedIdentity, From Australia where everything is upside down!! From my experience as a type 1 diabetic, not as professional advice or opinion:
    I have been on insulin for 52 years and still remember my own 'introduction' to diabetes in 1966!!
    But.., to let you know that there is life after diagnosis, and happiness, joy and the ability to achieve things.
    Your blood sugar levels (BSLs) are now very impressive, but as you say, hypos are more common. There is a very useful section on the Home page of this site, if you use the search box on the right upper section of the screen - and type in 'hypoglycaemia' (hypo = low, -gly = glucose, -aemia = in the blood) or 'hypos' for short. It takes time to 'fine tune' doses of insulin and how much you eat to help prevent hypos but trying to avoid them is best. Your health team is the most important source of help to you.
    Our eyes/focus change when blood sugar levels (BSLs) are high. It can take some weeks for this to settle down once BSLs are nearer the normal range. Diabetics are generally advised not to have any measure and maybe change in spectacle prescriptions for at least 5 to 6 weeks after things have settled.
    One step at a time: all of us have felt overwhelmed when we were first diagnosed. Trying to deal with all the information, emotion etc at once is impossible. So step by step, building on the experience you gain and information you receive. And we on site have made enough mistakes along the way to help you!!
    Humour: As unhumourous as you last few weeks have been, developing humour does help to deal with one's emotions and to cope: For example: I used to refer to my insulin injections as 'javelin practice'; a husband and son of a mother with diabetes would bet on what her before-dinner BSL would be and the loser did the washing up, and I can still recall the funny parts of some 'hypo' experiences from the past: like when only 1 year after diagnosis back before glucose meters and with use of only basic insulins given with glass syringes and reusable needles and I was at a local swimming baths and went hypo. According to the swimming pool attendants I was found trying to put an imaginary token into the turnstile device leading to the ladies change room. Rather embarrassing as an Aussie male!! It is the ability to joke and laugh at one's self that can take the seriousness, guilt and shame out of being diabetic.
    Breathe: I found that when stressed and worried I would hold my breath and in that state I was stuck, frozen, unable to think - which only makes the situation worse: When I consciously started to force myself to breathe evenly, not too deeply or fast, my mind clears and I could start to find ways to cope: The truck stuck in the tunnel had to wait for the young boy who was not distressed by the problem, who was breathing evenly, to suggest letting some air out of the truck's tyres.
    Support: Congratulations on finding the bestest diabetes site there is: use your family, relatives , friends, health team, this site to help with supporting you (there will be future times when you will do your bit for them so no need to feel guilty at relying on them). And there is no such thing as a simple or obvious or silly question. It is through asking that we learn and we have all at some stage asked a question that we now look back on as obvious. And even after 52 years with insulin as my best friend I still learn things !! I just have to be careful not to assume that I know it all !!
    So keep posting, asking questions, dealing with the most important things first such as BSLs, what to eat and avoiding hypos. Of course your own family situation needs some of your attention also. It is the challenge, not matter how underserved or unfair, that makes us stronger and more resilient. Best Wishes, fellow warrior !!
    .......................It is all about balance.......Things to do not always go the plan........Things can be daunting at times
    IMG_3067.jpg .... P3310301.jpg ...... .............................. IMG_3824.jpg .............................. .. IMG_3102 (1).jpg

    ...................................But most things are possible

    .......................................... 17903592_10206204455349159_992899227923968847_n.jpg
     

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    #34 kitedoc, Dec 27, 2018 at 1:05 AM
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2018
  15. MisplacedIdentity

    MisplacedIdentity · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you so much for your reply, everything you have stated makes sense and I'm beginning to get back to "normal" I'm no longer as bitter as I was immediately after diagnoses and discovering that I can still have a bit of chocolate when I want it. Just need to be able to drive again so I can work. Maybe 2 more weeks off work will do me good :)
     
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  16. CornishKate

    CornishKate LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @MisplacedIdentity your story sounds so similar to mine. I was diagnosed in April (I’m 45) and what a shock! My eyes were very blurry after diagnosis and I had to buy cheap reading glasses from Wilko just to even be able to look at my phone. The blurriness completely went after about 4 weeks thankfully. I ended up having 9 weeks off work just to even start to process the diagnosis. But, I’ve found it’s gotten easier, slowly but surely. I attended my local DAFNE course in November and for my Libre trial and I have to say I wouldn’t be without it (I have to self fund). It’s a bumpy road and I have days where diabetes seems to want to shake me to remind me it’s there. I’ve found so much support on here. Sometimes just checking in and reading other posts has helped. Good luck xxx
     
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  17. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Took ages for my eyes to adjust. I have loads of contact lenses in different prescriptions from back then.

    If you're on insulin you need to inform the DVLA and send your licence off to them - if you're not driving right now then it's the ideal time to do it.
     
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  18. tomrose

    tomrose Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello,
    My, and I'm sure a lot of people here, heart(s) go out to you; being diagnosed is a complete uprooting of your normal existence, routine and perspective - but as time goes by it does become more a part of everyday normal life and, if you want, you can continue to live in the same way you used to. I was diagnosed in July and with a much less scarier tale than you and feel as though I have just about come to terms with it now.
    In regards to the screening - I have mine booked for next Monday, so it will have taken 6 months since diagnosis, but I did go to Boots in the meantime just for peace of mind that there was nothing horribly wrong, so if you are worried you could so that if you are able to get there?
    From my experience, it takes a little while to get in the 'system' of having all the right appointments and follow ups and you might need to gently remind your clinic that you are still waiting on some things. I have also found 'Living with Diabetes' support groups/ mornings quite useful, so it might be worth asking your consultant whether there is something equivalent run in your area.
    Happy new year and best of luck -
    Tom
     
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  19. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Expert

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    Loved that Post.[​IMG]
     
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  20. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi @MisplacedIdentity

    What an awful story and how shocking for you to find yourself in that situation so suddenly.

    like others my heart went out to you. with love and with anger for you at how it all went.

    But i followed the other posts and i can see the first wave of angst has receded, and you seem to be making inroads on your journey of how to deal with diabetes.<bravo>

    I'm type 2 (oct 2018). so can't help re insulin etc, but do have respect for those who do have to juggle so much more then i do.

    I'm glad you posted, i'm a big believer that put somethings down on paper or text is cathartic.
    it help to flesh out our feeling, and drain away some of the pain, leaving (hopefully) a clearer picture of where we are and how we move forward.

    Sorry to have heard of your tale of woes, but i can see some positives.

    You obviously have a loving family, and it's when we are at our lowest, that the true depth and worth of that love becomes crystal clear.

    and i can see by your attitude now, that to coin phrase
    "what doesn't kill you...better be running away fast, when you get back up.."
    has obviously transferred from you to the kids.

    When they saw YOU were so unwell and struggling to cope, THEY dug into to the reserves they probably didn't even know they had, to help the situation...that's LOVE & RESPECT, right there.

    You now have have proof, (if proof was needed) what a wonderful job you have done in raising them.

    Hope life begins to resemble a more stable period for you this year.
    Like many say, AND prove, life does move on, the weird becomes normal, and we cope, buckle up and move forward.

    the human spirit is pretty indomitable
    being tough isn't about not getting knocked down..(We all get knocked down in life),
    the true measure of TOUGH, is how many times we get back up.

    And you have definitely got back up.

    best wishes for the year.

    Kind regards.
     
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