1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Newly Diagnosed

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by WonderfulLife, Oct 15, 2013.

  1. WonderfulLife

    WonderfulLife · Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi
    I have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes today & it's come as a bit of shock. I have felt in a bit of a whirlwind today & don't really know where to start.
    It's diet controlled & would just like some initial advice on adjusting to it & recipe ideas.
    Any advice would be great.
     
  2. Tracey69

    Tracey69 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Hi and welcome,
    Well i would keep to low carbs. There is a book you can by on Amazon called carbs and cals, this will help.
    Also if you troll through the forum their are recipes and other type 2 on here.
    Take care
    Tracey
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Stef

    Stef · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi I was diagnosed last year and after a couple of days of being angry with myself threw out all the naughty food I shouldn't have in the house! Cutting down on carbs helps a lot and switch to wholewheat bread, pasta and brown rice if you do need some carbs .

    I increased fish and veggies in my diet and reduced my carbs & have lost three stone in a year which has really helped.

    Has your GP or diabetic nurse suggested you go to the dietician at the hospital? My local NHS trust run a day course to help you when you are newly diagnosed which really helped me put the change to my diet into perspective.
    .Good luck ! :thumbup:
     
  4. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    26,460
    Likes Received:
    4,871
    Trophy Points:
    248
    Hi and welcome to the forum :)

    Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask all the questions you need to and someone will help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find well over 30,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes ... rains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips
    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  5. WonderfulLife

    WonderfulLife · Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi to you all.
    Wow! Thank you for all the info. It's great! The diabetic nurse has enrolled me at a local diabetic group so I am waiting for that appt. Also gave me lots of paperwork to read & I have also been looking at the diabetes.uk website as well.
    I did get annoyed with myself for eating badly & getting in this state but I'm determined to sort it out :)
    Thanks guys. Let's keep in touch. Need the support.
     
  6. JaniceHeathcote

    JaniceHeathcote · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    I have been diagnosed just two weeks ago. Seen Diabetes Nurse referred me to a Desmond course but none available til next year. Can't see Dietician until end November.
    Feeling very confused about diet. I've got to lose weight, obviously but do I cut down Carbs or stick to a low calorie diet to try to get weight down. Nothing been said about checking blood sugars just gave me Metformin 500mg and see you in Jan. :(
     
  7. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

    Messages:
    10,591
    Likes Received:
    6,619
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi. Believe it or not you will overcome the shock we have all gone thru. As others have said a low-carb diet is the first priority. Get hold of a meter even if you have to buy one so you can find out which foods affect you and by how much. Don't worry too much about the usual 'eat healthy' mantra such as avoiding fat, salt and so on. For diabetics, carbs are the problem and fat can even slow-down the absorption of carbs. Meals are best focussed around protein, veg, some fat and some carbs. A lot of us try to keep the daily carb total below 150gm; see what your meter shows.
     
  8. whompa73

    whompa73 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Cant realy advise better than diabell other than to say some of us infact quite a lot of us have to be very low carb to get good results many under 30 grams I personally try fro 10 to 15 although have been failing for the last week . May need to kick myself
     
  9. mcdonagh47

    mcdonagh47 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Hi there,

    Here below is a basic starter kit for new T2s in three easy posts .

    The first is Jennifer's Smart Advice on how to establish what foods cause your bgs to rise.

    The second, from an Australian Type 2 Guru, Alan S, suggests sensible practical steps based on Jennifer's advice.

    The third is Maggie Davey's "Open Letter to a Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetic". A basic outline of one T2 got into shape ...

    http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14045524.php

    http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.co.uk/200 ... djust.html

    http://www.sequin.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/ ... penlet.pdf

    After reading and digesting those you might consider getting the book called "Type 2 Diabetes ; The First Year" by
    Gretchen Becker ( ISBN 1-84119-8084-8 )
     
  10. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

    Messages:
    10,591
    Likes Received:
    6,619
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Slightly off topic, but in response to Whompa73, if your sugars don't reduce a lot with your very low-carbing and you are not overweight then do consider the possibility of LADA (Late onset T1). I was diagnosed as a T2 despite not being overweight and having even lost weight just before diagnosis. I gradually had to have more tablets, finally three types, and had to keep reducing my carbs (but nowhere near your low-level). I went onto insulin 6 months ago and it's been almost a miracle. So, if you can't manage without extreme low-carbing and your HBa1C goes above 7.5% then do discuss adding more tablets and finally insulin if needed. If you are overweight and hence insulin resistant then weight reduction should help a lot.
     
  11. WonderfulLife

    WonderfulLife · Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    All this advice is great. What I could really do with is information about what I can snack on. Low fat crisps? Any nuts?
    And where would I get a monitor to keep a check on my levels?
     
  12. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

    Messages:
    10,591
    Likes Received:
    6,619
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I think nuts are one of the best and healthy snacks. One of the meters with cheap strips is the SD Codefree from Amazon. Most of the other manufacturers will provide a meter from free if you ask. Strips are cheaper on the web.
     
  13. Etty

    Etty Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    367
    Likes Received:
    190
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Eat meat and non-root vegetables, eggs and dairy products, natural fats like butter and olive oil.
    Avoid food made from grains (bread, pasta, rice etc.), and anything sweet, like sweet fruit.
    Crackerbread and Finncrisp are a good lo-carb replacement for bread.
    More detail here: http://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf.
     
  14. WonderfulLife

    WonderfulLife · Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Thanks all. Had a bit of a wobbly up & down emotional day today. Had a bit of a wobbly about what I get eat. Hubby took me out for a meal at the local pub. I had pasta with salmon,cherry toms, soya beans, sugar snap peas, sun dried tomatoes & green pesto. It was delicious & very filling. Not feelng so bad now. Also found that I can eat Snack a Jacks, which I love. Slowly discovering things.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook