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Oily Fish - How do I avoid Salt?

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by Bluenosesol, Jun 7, 2009.

  1. Bluenosesol

    Bluenosesol Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    I have been on low carb and eating lots of oily fish. Need also to keep salt down to maintain a healthy blood pressure. Now I find out that most oily fish especially smoked salmon and kippers is loaded with sodium. Any ideas or advice would be gratefully received.

    Thx Steve.
     
  2. Doczoc

    Doczoc · Well-Known Member

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    Yep they tend to be unfortunately :(

    Are you sure that salt is the cause of your high blood pressure? I know it's the first thing you think of when you you think high BP, but a reduction in salt intake has been shown to have a relatively small effect on blood pressure, unless you are one of the unlucky people who are particularly sensitive!

    I had high blood pressure for years, and followed the low sodium advice to no benefit. Within a month of going low carb it normalized and has been normal ever since (I'm eating lots of salt as and addition to recipes but I don't eat processed foods)!

    To answer your question though, I've been eating mackerel in tomato sauce which has 0.75gs of salt per 100g which is about 1g per can. Otherwise why not eat fresh mackerel fillets from fishmongers, fresh salmon or trout?

    As a general recommendation, try to eliminate processed foods from your diet, they are usually loaded too! Start think quality when it comes to food, the better the quality to begin with the less you have to do to it. I always use unsalted butter in cooking too!
     
  3. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    (WRITTEN BEFORE PREVIOUS POSTING)
    Steer away from the processed, buy and cook from fresh or frozen. Eat a variety of types because of possible pollutants (not always easy if buying from some UK supermarkets)
    oily fish:
    Anchovies
    Carp
    Eel
    Herring
    Mackerel
    Salmon
    Sardines
    Swordfish
    Trout
    panga
    Tuna (fresh not canned)
    I didn't realise (because I hate it so hadn't checked) that tinned tuna counts as a white not an oily fish because the canning process destroys the oils.
    Because of pollutants the FSA says that, girls and women who may become pregnant should limit oily fish to 2, 140gm portions a week, men and post menopausal women to 4, 140gm portions.

    Apparently, Swordfish (if you can find it) should be limited to 1 portion a week because of dioxins. Herring also contains high quantities, trout contains the lowest, with salmon and mackerel containing intermediate amounts.
    (By the way this thread is relevent to many people, no matter how many carbs they eat :) )
     
  4. Doczoc

    Doczoc · Well-Known Member

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    Great post Phoenix! I'll take that info on board, thanks!
     
  5. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    Fresh or frozen fish takes only moments to cook.
     
  6. Bluenosesol

    Bluenosesol Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thx folks,
    great advice as usual I will certainly take it on board...

    Steve.
     
  7. Trinkwasser

    Trinkwasser · Well-Known Member

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    I concur, only a relatively small proportion of the population are sodium sensitive in terms of BP. It appears that more people have success by increasing potassium HOWEVER if you try this beware of the likely BG effects of eating fruit, and always read the small print on your meds, particularly BP meds and diuretics, as potassium is contraindicated with some. I use Lo-Salt in place of normal salt.

    Cutting the carbs had a major effect in improving my BP too, which cuting the salt never did.
     
  8. Jo123

    Jo123 · Well-Known Member

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    Totally concur with Trinks and Doczoc, my BP was monitored by GP yearly as I had a high normal BP, I had restricted my salt intake drastically, since going low carb it has gone to a low normal :D and I no longer bother with watching my salt intake, however I hardly eat any processed food but I do eat bacon, smoked salmon, tinned macarel now which all contain salt.
     
  9. Trinkwasser

    Trinkwasser · Well-Known Member

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    Depending who you believe, the population of sodium sensitive hypertensives is between 10 - 30% yet we are ALL told to eat less salt, apparently this is now causing goitres in the States since it means people are cutting their iodine consumption through not eating iodised salt. Probably less of a concern here where iodine levels are higher, but an interesting problem.
     
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