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Overnight level not coming down.

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by lucylocket61, Nov 16, 2021.

  1. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I doubt Abbott thought of people who only need the information from one sensor in their marketing plan.:)
     
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  2. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    I had my booster vaccine today, Pfizer, so will see what happens. The other two vaccinations raised my blood sugar levels for a few days.

    Then I will go back to some serious testing and monitoring using my sdcodefree meter. I have some new strips now.
     
  3. KennyA

    KennyA Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    They may not have, but they certainly should have.
    Given the reported failure rate, though, you might justifiably wonder if the free trial is a cheap and easy way of Abbott getting a lot of beta and user experience testing done. When you ask for the replacement, they want both the failure codes from the app and the failed sensor itself returned. If true, this doesn't bother me - it's a fair exchange.
     
  4. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Abbott don't need to worry with the millions of people forecast to be diagnosed over the next decades.

    Plus, speaking personally, it's hard to stop at just one. I do like to save up experiments for when I am wearing one. Anything from certain foods to different intensity of exercise to different eating patterns. They are all much easier to see with a cgm than the continual finger pricking.
    Like everything else in modern life, it's nice to be able to choose an easier, if more expensive, option
     
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  5. Drfarxan

    Drfarxan · Well-Known Member

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    Both when you wake up(dawn phenomenon) and also when you are under stress from emotions or even infection your cortisol level goes up. High cortisol level increases insulin resistance and raises blood sugar.
     
  6. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lucy, it may be the other way round. I know that when my levels go high in the night it actually causes the nightmares. I'm usually stable during the night but on the very odd occasion when I know I've had a disturbed sleep, with nightmares, I check my libre and yep, it shows a high.
     
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  7. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    MrsA2, without a doubt. When your body is in stress mode it releases all sorts of things to 'help' you cope, adrenaline, cortisol and all those other stress hormones thinking it's in danger and about to fight or flight. In my job we regularly go on courses that explain all of this because we have to (try) and adopt methods to combat, recognise and manage our body's responses or we might end up going over the top or running off! Not a good look. Unfortunately going hand in glove with that is our body's helpful response of releasing glucose. Ok for everyone else whose bodies can cope admirably but not for those with diabetes.
     
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  8. docphi

    docphi Type 2 · Active Member

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    I use a Dexcom CGM. My initial thought was to use it temporarily while I’m figuring out what food works for me and what doesn’t. Almost four months into my diagnosis and I can’t be without it. I can’t seem to keep my sugars from going low (no meds) so the CGM allows me to see the downward trend so I can stay ahead of the low. IMHO, one of the downsides to these CGM’s is that you can go crazy with all of the data. A lot of it doesn’t pertain to T2D’s as I’ve learned over these last few months. I would give the Abbott a go. You’d be surprised what your blood glucose is doing.
     
    #28 docphi, Dec 7, 2021 at 12:21 AM
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2021
  9. jape

    jape Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am on my 63rd sensor now, and have only instance where the sensor was a complete dud. Abbot replaced it immediately without any haggling. I don't pay for it, as it is covered by the health plan here in Ontario. So, cost is not a factor.

    Whenever I cheat by eating some carb rich foods, within 30/45 minutes, I can see the consequences of my irresponsible actions. The beauty of it is that it helps to keep me on the straight and narrows!
     
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  10. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am surprised you can go too low without medication. What do you call "too low" and do you confirm the reading with a finger prick test?
     
  11. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    I go under 3 and have even fainted, as my liver appears to have a delayed response. I am diet only. It can, and does happen.
     
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  12. docphi

    docphi Type 2 · Active Member

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    Low is in the 80's. Once in the 70's. Confirmed with finger stick. When I was first diagnosed in August, I was having false hypo symptoms in the 140's. My A1C was 8.6 so average glucose was 200. I've been using the CGM to float my blood glucose down gradually. Now I can tolerate in the 115 range. I haven't been able to get lower yet, but, it's a step forward. I don't really see that liver response in between meals. Every time I try and hold off eating, the blood glucose goes lower and lower and then I bail. However, my glucose holds steady overnight as soon as my head hits the pillow. And in the morning there's a liver dump happening so the liver is capable it's just confused during the day. Lol! Doctors will tell you your risk of hypoglycemia as a T2D on no meds is the same as a non-diabetic. They'll also tell you Metformin can't make you go hypo. They're wrong on both counts.
     
  13. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    Technically 72dg/dL is the same as 4mmol/L, which is hypo as far as conventional wisdom goes. While I appreciate that your body is getting hypo symptoms at levels higher than this, you could argue that this is a question of you getting used to lower levels, rather than a true (as in will go unconscious without glucose) hypo. However I seem to remember that you've got some other medical stuff going on so I appreciate that you want to normalise your levels gradually, (and it sounds like you are making good progress).
     
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