1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Peter Attia, MD Podcast #69 – Ronesh Sinha, M.D.: Insights into the manifestation of metabolic...

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Winnie53, Sep 2, 2019.

  1. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,020
    Likes Received:
    1,993
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Peter Attia, MD is one of the most brilliant physicians I've come across in my online wanderings on the topic of metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Did you know that insulinema, or high insulin levels, precedes pre-diabetes and diabetes by a decade but physicians do not typically check the fasting insulin level in the US? And did you know that there's another marker that precedes pre-diabetes and diabetes? High triglyceride levels. And in the US that is checked annually with the Lipid Panel following a 12-hour fast. Do you know your lab results over the last ten years? Ask your doctor for a copy.

    This podcast begins with a discussion of subcutaneous and visceral fat.

    What is it?

    "Subcutaneous fat refers to the fat stored under the skin. It’s a combination of brown, beige, and white fat cells. The majority of our body fat is subcutaneous. It’s the fat that you can squeeze or pinch on your arms, belly, thighs, and buttocks. Fitness professionals use calipers to measure subcutaneous fat as a way of estimating total body fat percentage. A certain amount of subcutaneous fat is normal and healthy, but too much can lead to imbalanced hormone levels and sensitivity."

    "Visceral fat, also known as “belly fat,” is the white fat that’s stored in your abdomen and around all of your major organs, such as the liver, kidneys, pancreas, intestines, and heart. High visceral fat levels can increase your risk for diabetes, heart disease, stroke, artery disease, and some cancers."

    Excerpt from https://www.healthline.com/health/types-of-body-fat#subcutaneous

    How do I know my level of visceral fat?

    "Iwasaki et al in a cross-sectional study of 257 Japanese patients, by using more accurate measures of body composition such as by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, showed that higher levels of GGT were significantly associated with higher visceral fat whereas no association was observed with subcutaneous fat, proposing that the serum GGT may be useful as a convenient indicator of visceral adiposity (24)."

    Excerpt from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5911166/

    Bottom line: Too much visceral fat, the fat you can't see, and this includes those with healthy, even underweight BMI's, puts us a risk for developing or worsening diabetes. The GGT, serum Gamma-glutamyltransferase, lab test gives us an indication of the amount of visceral fat present.

    Listen to the podcast here...

    #69 – Ronesh Sinha, M.D.: Insights into the manifestation of metabolic disease in a patient population predisposed to metabolic syndrome, and what it teaches us more broadly

    https://peterattiamd.com/roneshsinha/

    Click on link, scroll down, click on the "play" arrow. On the bar is a 15 second replay icon if you miss something and need to hear it again. (I use that button a lot). [giggle]

    I'm listening to it now while cleaning around the house.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,020
    Likes Received:
    1,993
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I finished listening to the podcast. The first part was interesting but the middle part got bogged down in detail. The last part focused on the effect of stress on glucose levels, also the amount of stress teens today are under.

    I'm glad I listened to it because it helped me better understand how insulin resistance can differ depending on one's heritage. That was discussed off and on throughout much of the podcast.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    #2 Winnie53, Sep 3, 2019 at 7:12 AM
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2019
  3. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,020
    Likes Received:
    1,993
    Trophy Points:
    178
    This is such an important topic. Here's a better presentation on fatty liver and insulin resistance...



    I've listened to this lecture at least a half-dozen times. And each time I pick up something new. Definitely worth a listen. This one is the easiest to understand. There are additional presentations on YouTube in which he goes into greater detail. I think I've listened to them all!
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook