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Podcast with Boston University Bionic Pancreas study medic

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by pjcand, Jun 2, 2015.

  1. pjcand

    pjcand Type 1 · Member

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    I'm a software developer and listen to a few different geeky podcasts as a result. One of the people I follow is a Microsoft employee called Scott Hanselman. He is a Type 1 and last year he interviewed one of the medics who worked/is working on the Bionic Pancreas study at Boston University. Scott is a insightful chap, very easy to listen to and the podcast gives a really good idea of the work under way in Massachusetts. I highly recommend a listen to anyone interested in this study:

    http://hanselminutes.com/431/exploring-the-bionic-pancreas-with-dr-steven-jon-russell-md-phd
     
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  2. Celsus

    Celsus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi pjcand, thanks for the link!
    Been following the Boston crew for a while. (x-microsoftie myself). Also tried to do the gadget jail-breaking to simulate the closed-looped solution they were working on earlier. Especially their latest version of the software algorithm appear to be a couple of classes better now than any previous trial in this area. Not sure if I should hope that they get bought up or not by one of the old large players in this field... But I would love to see if they manage to reduce the device size and integrate all functionality into it being only one single gadget for all as they are targeting now. Not a cure but surely could be a great help for many to survive longer and with less/avoid complications all together.
     
  3. HaroldC

    HaroldC · Well-Known Member

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    Celsius & Co,
    Been looking at dexdrip, looks really nice - would like to lay out a better format board for it to carry around (including something cool for battery charging and in integrated display - considering a circular LCD made for dashboards) Anyway, have you guys managed to jailbreak the Accu-chek pump/controller Bluetooth protocols?
     
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  4. Celsus

    Celsus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi HaroldC, we need definitely to have the battery charge done without cabling/connectors!
    Working in the industry also myself but for other disease areas, and have made charge functionality via induction charge which is a big hit with the patients. Two practical/handy ways to do this. A 'charger pad' on which the patient can lay the device (e.g. at the bedside table' upon waking up 5-8 hours later, the device is fully charged again. Alternatively I have also made a "charger belt". It works in the way the patient charges up a powerpack. This powerpack cell is then worn in a small belt (e.g. around the waist) in proximity of the device. Induction will then again charge the device back to full charge and can work again for next 5-10 days without recharge.
    For the AccuChek protocol, join us at:
    https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/openaps-dev/hXDMbpMD3XI
    For my own AccuChek Mobile you had the following:
    Escrypt library (Cycurlib) version 2.7.
    The meter is Continua-compliant and contains only the public key needed for the authemtication.
    Meters only contain the public key needed for the authentication
    2kB of RAM
    10 kB of code space
    3 seconds to authenticate.
    Handheld medical devices are to use the IEEE 11073 standard for wireless communication, see 10417 for glucose in communication layers 5-7 in the OSI model.
    You may try and contact Ulrich Porsch or Dr Ralf Schmitz as they are responsible for the Accu-chek device communication (standards and device software coding) at Roche.

    Another 'private' guy to get in contact with would be Jon:
    http://people.cs.pitt.edu/~jmisurda/ppc/GlucoComm/GlucoComm.htm
    He has made a couple of apps downloading the data from the AccuChek product family.
     
  5. HaroldC

    HaroldC · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks very much for that information on the Accu-chek. I think I will concentrate on the xDrip, I've spent the morning hunting around TI's website looking to see if there's a SimpliciTI & Bluetooth stack available on one of their newer devices - so far I've found that SimpliciTI will not be supported on devices after the CC2530, I'm hoping I can find if they support a Bluetooth stack on a CC253x which would make a very elegant xDrip solution. I will certainly integrate a TI bq51050B Qi compliant Li-ion charger IC following your recommendation. Thankfully the LTSpice simulations of my SMPS are taking ages, so I'll have a bit of time spare to look over possible silicon.
     
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  6. Celsus

    Celsus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Harold, the BQ51050B is definitely a very elegant way to integrate that functionality.
    Fingers crossed for your project and let us hear sometimes about your progress with it !!
     
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  7. DunePlodder

    DunePlodder Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I added a QI wireless charger to my most recent build of the xDrip box. The 1200mAh battery takes about 4 hours to charge & lasts around 3.5 days.
     
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  8. Celsus

    Celsus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Excellent DunePlodder - That is pretty cool shxt ! :)
     
  9. DunePlodder

    DunePlodder Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My soldering isn't too brilliant so the less I have to plug things in & out the better!
    2015-06-20 16.14.50.jpg
     
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  10. HaroldC

    HaroldC · Well-Known Member

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    Looks like it'll have to be separate Bluetooth and SimpliciTI ICs, type modulation schemes are too different to use the same baseband modem stages in one IC - which is a bit of a pain.
     
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