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Prunes

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by shavals, Dec 20, 2007.

  1. shavals

    shavals · Active Member

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    Hi

    Can a diabetic eat prunes as a fruit portion?

    Cheers, Pauline

    Pauline Jones
     
  2. erroneous

    erroneous · Well-Known Member

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    Yes you can. It's a fruit like any other. Check the carbs amount and adapt it to your insulin intake if you are on insulin. Better to eat it at the end of a meal for example.

    When i don't know the amount of carbs in something i go there >>

    http://www.calorieconnect.com/
     
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  3. erroneous

    erroneous · Well-Known Member

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    But actually you're type 2!
    So i don't know how it works for you :oops:
     
  4. Dennis

    Dennis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Pauline,

    Answer to your question is yes, provided they are not tinned prunes in syrup. I pulled this off a healthfoods website for you:

    "Prunes' soluble fiber helps normalize blood sugar levels by slowing the rate at which food leaves the stomach and by delaying the absorption of glucose (the form in which sugar is transported in the blood) following a meal. Soluble fiber also increases insulin sensitivity and can therefore play a helpful role in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. And, prunes' soluble fiber promotes a sense of satisfied fullness after a meal by slowing the rate at which food leaves the stomach, so prunes can also help prevent overeating and weight gain."
     
  5. bluebird

    bluebird Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Dennis

    Why not tinned prunes in juice? Are the ones in packets (not dried) ok?

    Regards Val
     
  6. Dennis

    Dennis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Val,

    You just need to check the can label for "carbohydrate, of which sugars . . ." because some that claim to be canned in natural fruit juice also have sugar added. Even if they have absolutely no added sugar, it depends on what kind of juice they have used.

    Packets are either fully or partly dried and both are good.
     
  7. shavals

    shavals · Active Member

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    thanks for your useful info Dennis, anything to help my levels.



    Pauline Jones
     
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