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Question = Answer Ha

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Matthew1990, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. Matthew1990

    Matthew1990 · Well-Known Member

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    Right me again, just a question that I think I may know the answer to haha!

    I had egg sandwiches in wholemeal bread x 2 for lunch and 2 rich tea biscuits. I injected 2units of humalog insulin for this meal.

    2 hours after lunch I scored 5.8 which is goood.
    1 hour and half after the last check of 5.8 and before my evening meal I scored 8.1.

    Is this down to the food taking longer to absorb and under the blood stream and could it be down to the 2 rich tea biscuits I had? If not what has occured :)
     
  2. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Could be a delay in your food digesting or it might be that your basal insulin needs adjusting.

    Nigel
     
  3. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    As Nigel said, plus....

    It was the bread that put up your Bg !

    Bread is a starchy, slow acting carb. The Rich Tea biscuits are 5.6 gms of carb per biscuit = 11.2 gm of carb. Plus the bread (average 36 gm of carb ) total would have been around 47.2 gms of carbs.

    Would two units of Insulin be sufficient for that amount of carbs ?
     
  4. Matthew1990

    Matthew1990 · Well-Known Member

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    Thats very true, god i can't wait to get to the carbo counting in mid feb :D Going to benefit more so much ill be able to eat carbs but would have learnt how much to inject to cover that meal etc :)

    Thanks guys!
     
  5. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    Be careful with the carbs, Matt ! The more carbs you eat and cover with Insulin the more fat production is stimulated...You could end up with both Type 1 and Type 2 if you don't watch the carb intake.
     
  6. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    You'll benefit a great deal from the DAFNE course Matthew, but it's not a excuse to overindulge and the purpose of the course is to teach you the technique of achieving normal blood glucose after eating, DAFNE doesn't stipulate what you should and shouldn't eat and see this as a individual choice, but to my mind its best to eat carbs in moderation and stick to a healthy diet to delay or prevent the long-term complications that can come with diabetes.

    Nigel
     
  7. dectjoh

    dectjoh · Well-Known Member

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    "carbs in moderation"

    What would be the rda to match this statement please?

    Tracy
     
  8. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Depends where you look as they keep changing the goalposts Tracy, but most would agree that its a individual choice depending upon how well you can tolerate them whilst maintaining normal blood glucose, you'll find you never get the same answer but my minimum intake is 90g-130g max of carbs a day.

    Nigel
     
  9. dectjoh

    dectjoh · Well-Known Member

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    Now you see, this is where I get confused. I'm newly diagnosed and thought I had a fairly good diet. Routine appointment was set up for me with a dietician post diagnosis and she said that my diet was too low in terms of carb intake. At that point my intake was averaging around 110g. She said I need to get that up to closer to 230g! "I'll be like the side of a house if I try to do that" was my response! I have however tried to increase it and so far have managed around 180g a day. Now what do I do? Go back to where I was or try to continue to aim higher? My thinking was to reduce my carbs to reduce my insulin intake without making my life miserable of course .... any advice most welcome!

    Tracy
     
  10. Matthew1990

    Matthew1990 · Well-Known Member

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    Mhmmm its a very confusing matter, I was diagnosed last month and I thought it was just sugar intake you had to reduce, not carb intake. I personally would say I eat a lot of carbs but spaced out throughout the day, say around 30-40grams per meal something a lot more. I also think that as carb intake can make you fat/put on weight it depends how active you are and how you use the carbs an energy. I play football 3 times a week, gym 3-4 times a week, out and about in uni and work etc so I need carbs! Haha
     
  11. viviennem

    viviennem Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Read around, Dectjoh, particularly on the Low-carb Forum section. Some of us are very low carb ( I aim for between 30g and 50g per day), some can tolerate more. I'm Type 2 so don't really understand Type 1, but sugars are just one form of carbohydrate and all carbohydrates turn to glucose and affect your blood glucose levels, so it seems to make sense to me to reduce them in my diet. Protein eventually turns to glucose too, so you're not missing out on fuel by reducing carbs. If you are very active you can probably tolerate more carbs than some. Basically, if you test just before and 2 hours after every meal, you'll get an idea of which foods you can tolerate and which foods send your bg too high.

    There are people on here who know much more than I do, and I'm sure someone will be along sooner or later to help more :D
     
  12. scoots

    scoots Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi Matthew,

    I was diagnosed T1 a couple of years ago, and it did take quite a while for my levels to get to anywhere near sorted or predictable. I would have one jaffa cake biscuit and my bs would go sky high, then I was in the honeymoon period with my own natural insulin production kicking in periodically so for quite a while I was getting a lot of hypos but also able to eat a lot more carbs and 'get away with it' i.e. not have to take as much/any insulin to cover it (as I knew if I did I would have a hypo...!).

    It certainly is a rollercoaster ride, the main thing is to get a good balance between eating healthily, keeping fit and enjoying life, to keep a close eye on the interaction between food/meds and how this affects you. As with all things diabetes, this will be different for you, me, and everyone on this forum.

    Welcome to the club, enjoy the ride!

    Jen x
     
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