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Saturated Fats

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Kyambala, Dec 19, 2016.

  1. trotskyite

    trotskyite · Well-Known Member

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    Here is some more research :)
    These are high quality studies that show the same effect over and again (there never seems to be studies showing you need to severely limit broccoli or cauliflower to 1 a day to avoid negative consequences, quite telling I feel)

    http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/87/4/964.full.pdf
    "Compared with the lowest category of egg consumption, the intake of 7 eggs/wk was associated with a 22% greater risk of death in the absence of prevalent diabetes"
    Conclusions: Infrequent egg consumption does not seem to influence the risk of CVD in male physicians. In addition, egg consumption was positively related to mortality, more strongly so in diabetic subjects, in the study population

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22882905
    conclusion
    Our findings suggest that regular consumption of egg yolk should be avoided by persons at risk of cardiovascular disease.


    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26062990
    conclusion:
    Egg consumption was associated with an increased prevalence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and with a greater degree of coronary calcification


    http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/189529
    Conclusions These findings suggest that consumption of up to 1 egg per day is unlikely to have substantial overall impact on the risk of CHD or stroke among healthy men and women.
     
  2. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    One high quality study says 7 eggs per week increases your risk of death by 22% and another says 1 egg per day is fine. They can't both be right, can they?
     
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  3. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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  4. trotskyite

    trotskyite · Well-Known Member

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    That's right. They are suggesting that there is an upper limit of intake that is healthful related to how healthful the rest of your diet is but if you have underlying type2 diabetes it is a much lower intake for some unknown reason.
     
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  5. trotskyite

    trotskyite · Well-Known Member

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    Takeaway I get from that study:
    This study looked at young healthy people (for a reason I would suggest) and was limited to 14 weeks.
    "Methods: Thirty-eight healthy men and women [age 18–30 y, body mass index (in kg/m2) 18.5–29.9] participated in this 14-wk crossover intervention"

    They looked at lipoprotein subfractions which are presumed to be positive, not hard endpoints such as death/disease.

    Unfortunately I can't see the method but I would heavily suggest that the diet this cohort were given, other than eggs, was extremely low in sat fat and cholesterol as this has shown the most favourable conditions for egg consumption. As they well know.
    Also interesting to see this:
    • Supported by a... grant to DMD from the Egg Nutrition Center.

    • 2 Author disclosures: ... DM DiMarco and ML Fernandez have received funding from the Egg Nutrition Center.
    All in all an interesting egg industry funded study showing (slightly) more egg consumption not look as bad as it does in all well conducted independent meta-analysis (in relation to lipoprotein fractions). For healthy young people on a very healthy diet. Job done. As egg consumption is probably not a problem for 18year olds over 14weeks I agree with the conclusions of this study.

    However if we compare this to a well designed independent study we find this:

    Egg consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes: a meta-analysis.
    OBJECTIVES:
    To assess the dose-response relationship between egg consumption and the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes.
    Fourteen studies involving 320,778 subjects were included from 1930s onwards.

    Those that ate the most eggs had a 19% increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a 68% increased risk of diabetes, and then diabetics had an 85% increased risk of heart disease.
    Less than a single egg a day was associated with a significantly increased risk of heart disease.
    Just over a half an egg a day may increase heart disease risk between 6 and 40%, and the risk of diabetes 29%."
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23643053

    I'm sure the conclusions of both of the studies are true however I know which one is more relevant to me.
     
  6. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No, the 22% increase in mortality study says "in the absence of prevalent diabetes". These two studies have contradictory conclusions regarding one egg per day.
     
  7. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  8. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    But not a healthy diet apparently, there is a bit of selective editing in the blog.

    'the patient was described as having an extremely poor memory and had been given a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and intermittent depression.'

    'The patient's dietary history, confirmed by personnel at the retirement community, revealed that his diet was general, consisting of fruits, vegetables, cereals, and meats, but the quantity of these other foods obviously was quite limited. Because of this, his physician had been treating him with vitamin supplements for many years, which may well explain the absence of nutritional deficiency.'

    'man does not live by egg alone'

    I'll take my chances of eating a healthy, balanced diet, and try to dodge everything that may come my way.
     
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  9. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    All this is eggstrodinary!!
     
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  10. Kyambala

    Kyambala Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am now back in the UK and am trying to put into effect all the good advice that Forum members have been giving me over these past 3 months. Cut down on potatoes, bread, rice, pizza, etc. But will miss my Naan bread, Garlic bread, oranges for breakfast, and home made muesli. I had some lovely "honey roast ham" and egg for supper. Delicious.
     
  11. Kyambala

    Kyambala Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Got weighed on Thursday. Over the past 3 months my weight has gone from 80 kg to 85 kg even though I don't feel as bloated as I was 3 months ago. Any suggestions?
     
  12. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    What have you changed in your eating habits
    ?
     
  13. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Well you have been eating lots of carbs in Uganda..or at least that's what you reported here so that accounts for the weight gain. Now you are eating less carbs you aren't getting so bloated maybe?
     
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  14. Kyambala

    Kyambala Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks bulkbiker that sounds logical.
     
  15. Kyambala

    Kyambala Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday I started the LCHF diet. Breakfast: home made Muesli. Lunch: salad, cheese, one half slice of bread. Evening meal: Lamb shanks, cauliflower, sprouts, cheese sauce. No potatoes and carrots.

    Didn't even feel hungry this morning so delayed breakfast until 10 am (home made muesli). Ate lunch at 4 pm (cooked ham, cheese) about to have another lamb shank, etc. I am still not hungry (unusual).
     
  16. Kyambala

    Kyambala Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello Freema. Much less carbs since I came home.
     
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