1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

see what this 92 year old granny did

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by mekalu2k4, Jun 4, 2015.

  1. mekalu2k4

    mekalu2k4 Parent · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    171
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I am sure, most of you have already read this news.
    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/20...n-92-oldest-woman-complete-marathon-san-diego

    The point here for the forum members is (well known, age old fact) - age is just a number. T2D folks should push themselves to stay active. A systematic practice of 4 to 5 years will put most of the folks there. Just that

    Please note some facts from the article:
    1. She did not begin running marathons until she was in her 70s [so, age is a number again]
    2. Her son accompanied her throughout the marathon and supplied her 'carbs' [1. you need company 2. can take carbs (beware of quantity though) if active like this]
    3. she is a cancer survivor, and cancer runs in her family. [T2D is not as bad as cancer I believe]

    IMP:
    Do not get excited too much and hit the road without planning. If you are not a runner or obese or even not physically active type; -

    1. Start with WALKING. Yes, strictly start with walking for 30min (do this for 1 week, with 1 rest day), then to 45min (do this for 1 week, with 1 rest day) and then to 1 hour (do this for 2 weeks, with 1 rest day in each week) and then to 2 hours (do this for 4 weeks, with 1 rest day in each week - note that this is really tough if you are not active before). Basically you should not rest 2 hours means - 120 minutes of walking! Do not jog or run - this is too long for anyone of any age (if not active before), cardio is very demanding, body needs very long time to adjust to this kind of stress, especially knees will be victims. I did spend 5 months in strict walking phase and this is how I started.

    2. Second phase is 'mild jogging' - this is difficult and be careful. 10min of jogging (at a very slow pace). Take rest for 5 or 10 min, till you are perfectly normal and heartbeat is back to normal. Then 10min of jogging. Some might not be able to jog for 10min, if that is the case 5 min is fine too. Repeat 5 min or 10min spells of jogging for a total time of 30min. That would make about 1 hour plus time of active moving in the field or on tread mill. Best is to hit a treadmill as you will not overdo as it will display the speed - set your speed to 3km/hr. Key here is to spend 1hr active time!

    I cannot write next stage as I never managed to go past the second stage :) What I can do now is - I can run at 5km/hr for 6minutes non-stop; and will do those spells for a maximum time of 1hr 40min. I can do this everyday.

    By 2018 I am planning to run a half-marathon. Let us see, I am not in hurry or competing with anyone. But definitely fighting to delay the onset of T2D. My experienced instructor friend and other friends (who are all top end male & female/ young (below 30yrs)/athletes) advised me this, so I am in a very nice company. I am sharing my experience here, will be nice even if one or two members follow this or try something similar with long term goals to keep them fit. This is something like ND regime.
     
  2. mekalu2k4

    mekalu2k4 Parent · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    171
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Wanted to 'calibrate' myself with this Granny, after posting this on Thursday morning. Had to work all day from 8am to 5pm, with snack break at 10am; 1hour lunch break at 1pm.

    So I hit the ground at 5.50pm, started to run continuously to the point of collapse. I could manage maximum of 2hours. see the attached. The image shows all the events, I am talking about the Thursday, June 4, 2015. You can see my max heart rate (177), avg heart rate (150) and calories 1000+. This is my best, because I actually reached a point of collapse. Summary is - I could run for 6.86 miles in 1 hour 53 minutes, had downed a full Gatorade 600ml thirst quencher in the process. This 6.86 miles is not even a half marathon distance, so forget about full marathon that Granny did. I might need another two years of systematic training to reach her level. Running a marathon - 26 miles is by no means a joke.

    Why I am posting this?
    1. Granny's achievement is truly inspiring.
    2. It is so positive and impacting news article for me, so wanted to calibrate myself.
    3. I believe it is equally inspiring to many here; once capable anyone can attempt jogging.

    Apart from the above, I want to add a few more lines to my rant.
    Two and half years back my resting HR was 95 or so, which is very bad. At that time, my weight was more than 200lbs. Now, my resting heart rate can been on the 4th row of the data, while I was sleeping - which is about 64. This has to go down to 50, which is an athletic range.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,673
    Likes Received:
    3,674
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi,
    She is inspirational, I agree.
    I was 54 when I ran my first Marathon so far younger than Harriette Thompson in the article but it was diabetic athletes that inspired me . I ran one 18 months after being diagnosed with T1 diabetes. I had done some running in the past; I'd done a half marathon in my 30s and orienteered for many years.
    I too started slowly from where I was (I didn't have weight to lose)
    I started with running 30secs at an time and then walking, and gradually increasing the time running but still taking walking breaks when necessary.http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/c25k/Pages/get-running-with-couch-to-5k.aspx
    Basically, I used the same system that is used in the NHS couch to 5k plan.
    When I trained for my first marathon I used the Galloway plans which again involve walking breaks. http://www.jeffgalloway.com/training/marathon-training/
    It worked brilliantly and though I was slow (never tried to be fast) I finished in good shape, didn't even have much muscle soreness the following day.
    I did 2 others after that and several halfs but suspect I won't do another. (unless it's to prove I can when I get to 70) The big problem with marathon training is that it can be very time consuming .

    I wonder if it would be a good idea for you to include some sessions where you to walk a little more briskly for short periods (ie 30sec), interspersed with walking slower. Between lamp posts can work well. Perhaps you could find a hill, not too steep at first, to walk up and then down (increasing repetitions as you get fitter)
    Obviously you have to be guided by your heart rate but training for longer and longer sessions increases stamina but eventually you will need to go a bit faster
    (an 18 mile training run even at 13 min miles takes 4 hours; that's what I meant about time consuming). The best parties are definitely at the back of the marathon field and we get more time for our entry fee .Pragmatically though it's only the very biggest marathons that let people continue much beyond 6 hours.
    The first one I did wasn't that small but had a cut off of 5 hours. (not advertised until they sent final details.) They did relent and let a group of us who appealed start half an hour early with the half marathon)

    But before you get to the marathon or even half, why not aim to join in some shorter events?. There are lots of 5k charity events that you can aim for as a stepping stone.
    .
    Personally, I'd also try to get outside. Treadmills are fine for some training but a) they are different to being outside and that is what you will have to do in a marathon .b) they get very boring for long periods ) .
     
    • Like Like x 2
    #3 phoenix, Jun 7, 2015 at 11:28 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 7, 2015
  4. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    23,618
    Likes Received:
    19,616
    Trophy Points:
    278
    A remarkable lady, just goes to prove that age need not be a barrier to what you want to achieve.
     
  5. mekalu2k4

    mekalu2k4 Parent · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    171
    Trophy Points:
    83
    wow Phoenix! Thanks for response. Very much looking for positive, inspiring responses. Just came from Church after attending first prayer. Happy to read a positive and encourage response while enjoying my hot chocolate.

    I am indeed grateful for your lines of reply, your time. Yes, I need to push the limits. But I am reminded by my past - my obese body, big wobbly belly and weak legs. Replies like this, good company like my neighbor who trains me, and my Church are some of the 'gatekeepers' for me.

    Have a blessed Sunday!
     
  6. mekalu2k4

    mekalu2k4 Parent · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    171
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Hi Phoenix, From your post I sense that you are an athlete in higher or advanced stage than I am. So I cannot resist asking questions, please bear with me.

    1. I would like to know what is the impact of your marathon training on your T1D?

    2. My neighbor is white American (says that he is not aware of other races in terms of physical composition/responses, which I have to agree) and is actually the Guru for me for all purposes. He actually rebuilt my body over last 2 years and refilled loads of confidence and physical strength. However, he is of the opinion that humans cannot beat the genes and the way they are programmed. He is more on body weight exercises and does not like running at all. In the past, I was afraid to run due to fear of damaging my knees as I was very obese. Now after 2 years, for me running is easy on my body I will not get any cramps and excess body heat/ or so called burn. However, if I do body weight exercises of 500 calories worth then I need to take a Panadol 500mg to combat body heat. If have to equate, 2 hours of running is giving me the same burn of 1 hour of body weight exercises. What is your comment on this?

    3. I am seeing some articles on 'low carb/ high protein diet leads to elevated blood sugars'. is it true? my triglycerides are very low, but blood sugars are slightly high (6.1). I am on low carb/ high protein/low fat diet for last 3 months. Earlier blood sugars were very low when I am on normal diet. I do not drink or smoke. One GP told me yesterday that I need to eat more carbs, and raise my overall cholesterol since my LDL and HDL are way below the range. He told that cholesterol is the base for hormones and it is important that we need to strike balance by doing workouts and diet control in a moderate fashion.

    4. Are you still training? I read from your post that you may not have time to train for marathons or long hours. If you do not mind, what is your age and how many hours you train per day? per week? like how many days are marked for rest?
     
  7. enamor

    enamor Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi, What a great post, I thought I'd share my story too.

    T1 I started running after diagnosis 4 years ago and ran my first half marathon 2 years ago (I'm 42). My training schedule has no science I just followed my own idea and listened to my body and it worked for me.
    Started off with a target of 2 miles, ran, walked etc until I could run this distance without stopping, then just kept adding miles and followed the same process, keep at it until I can run it without stopping then increase. So far my furthest distance is 17 miles. If my legs ache too much I wait until they stop then get out there again.

    I did look up advice and read a lot of stuff about both running and running with diabetes but it all just kind of overwhelmed me with information and the science/biology of it all and took away some of the fun.

    So I guess there's no right or wrong way and the moral, if there is one, is whatever path you follow the end result is the same.

    There was one line that kept me going when ever I felt despondent and that was simply 'movement is movement, as long as I'm not sitting on the couch thinking about it its all good'.

    Good luck to everyone making the changes.
     
  8. mekalu2k4

    mekalu2k4 Parent · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    171
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Great! Thanks for response. What time you clocked in your first HM? I am bit afraid (well, actually lazy too) about my knees and body etc, so not overly pushing myself at this point. Responses like this will positively encourage me, I do hope others as well. Liked your pic, is it with that HM?

    Thanks.... I am trying.
     
  9. enamor

    enamor Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    43

    Hiya, yes that's me ready for the half marathon. I completed it in 2 hours 16 mins.

    Same as you I made the decision not to compete or to judge myself against others just keep doing my thing and every bit of progress was still progress.

    Finding inspiration in others is a fab motivator and a feel good factor.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook