1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Statins increase calcification of arteries

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by fatbird, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. fatbird

    fatbird · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    239
    Trophy Points:
    63
    The subject of statins is very controversial-some interesting information.

    The effect of statins on coronary artery plaque features beyond stenosis severity is not known. Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a novel non-invasive method that permits direct visualization of coronary atherosclerotic features, including plaque composition. We evaluated the association of statin use to coronary plaque composition type in patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing CCTA.

    METHODS:
    From consecutive individuals, we identified 6673 individuals (2413 on statin therapy and 4260 not on statin therapy) with no known CAD and available statin use status. We studied the relationship between statin use and the presence and extent of specific plaque composition types, which was graded as non-calcified (NCP), mixed (MP), or calcified (CP) plaque.

    RESULTS:
    The mean age was 59 ± 11 (55% male). Compared to the individuals not taking statins, those taking statins had higher prevalence of risk factors and obstructive CAD. In multivariable analyses, statin use was associated with increased the presence of MP [odds ratio (OR) 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27-1.68), p < 0.001] and CP (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.36-1.74, p < 0.001), but not NCP (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.96-1.29, p = 0.1). Further, in multivariable analyses, statin use was associated with increasing numbers of coronary segments possessing MP (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.34-1.73, p < 0.001) and CP (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.36-1.70, p < 0.001), but not coronary segments with NCP (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.94-1.25, p = 0.2).

    CONCLUSION:
    Statin use is associated with an increased prevalence and extent of coronary plaques possessing calcium. The longitudinal effect of statins on coronary plaque composition warrants further investigation.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22981406


    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of disability and death in civilized societies. Many factors are involved in its initiation and progression.27,28 Homocysteine or oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) can initially damage the inner arterial lining (the endothelium).29 To repair this damage, the endothelium produces collagen that forms a cap over the injury site.

    These endothelial collagen caps attract calcium that accumulates (calcifies) and forms a hard material resembling bone. This is why atherosclerosis is sometimes referred to as “hardening of the arteries.”

    Calcification of the coronary arteries markedly increases heart attack risk.30

    A substantial volume of studies shows that insufficient vitamin K2 accelerates arterial calcification.31 A new study shows that restoring vitamin K2 reverses arterial calcification.49

    Vitamin K functions to keep calcium in the bone and prevent its buildup in the arteries.23-26,28,31 If that is all vitamin K did, it would be one of the most important nutrients for aging humans to take. Newly published research, however, indicates vitamin K2 possesses a host of additional benefits.

    http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2009/jan ... ing_01.htm

    Excellent sources of vitamin K include parsley, kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard, green beans, asparagus, broccoli, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, collard greens, thyme, romaine lettuce, sage, oregano, cabbage, celery, sea vegetables, cucumber, leeks, cauliflower, tomatoes, and blueberries.

    http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tnam ... t&dbid=112

    FB
     
  2. fatbird

    fatbird · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    239
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Checking the forum rules I could not see a ruling. Is it bad etiquette to bump your own post? It's just that I thought this may be of interest to some members.

    FB
     
  3. collectingrocks

    collectingrocks · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    101
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Fantastic post fatbird. Certainly of interest to me...:)
     
  4. Thommothebear

    Thommothebear Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,186
    Likes Received:
    1,056
    Trophy Points:
    178
  5. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,572
    Likes Received:
    3,763
    Trophy Points:
    178
    You don't take statins if you're healthy.
    So it's not surprising you aren't in tip top condition if you're on them.


    Mediterranean diet, statins, right meds, good hba1c, good cholesterol, happy days.
    And as many visits to the doctor, dietician, hospital, nhs gym, optometrist, even street golf, as the nhs will provide. If anyone said anything bad about my care, there would be a problem.
    (nothing to do with the fact I'm now fit enough to have qualified as an open water diver, a year ago I would have qualified as a sea slug, on a good day)
     
  6. AlexMBrennan

    AlexMBrennan Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    385
    Likes Received:
    298
    Trophy Points:
    103
    The vitamin k link is interesting, but otherwise this is mostly academic - the benefits/risks are already accounted for in the analysis the statin recommendation is based on.
     
  7. Westie2

    Westie2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    28
    Trophy Points:
    58
    I agree with the above comments and will be reading the references in full when I have a chance.

    However if anyone is taking Warfarin please be aware that if you increase your intake of Vitamin K rich foods it will increase your INR and raise your risk of bleeding and associated side effects. Increase your intake slowly and discuss with your practice nurse, since you may need to increase your INR monitoring.


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  8. Paul_c

    Paul_c Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    58
    with current prescribing guidelines, they stick you (or attempt to) on statins as soon as you hit 40, just in case...
     
  9. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,572
    Likes Received:
    3,763
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Didn't with me, I went ten years without them, I'm only on them after the diabetes with highish cholesterol.
     
  10. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,427
    Likes Received:
    1,650
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I wouldn't worry, Statins are the new bad, old hat, demonised (they cause muscle pain) so the pharmaceuticals say. They are bringing out a new drug even worse than the statin. But don't worry it will be fine.
     
  11. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,572
    Likes Received:
    3,763
    Trophy Points:
    178
    The second article linking calcium loss from the bones to build up in the arteries leads to an interesting question.
    We did it to death here
    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=49502

    Another reason to make sure low carb isn't leading to osteoporosis, or kidney or bladder stones.
    And maybe at least to load up on foods high in vit K.
     
  12. Mongoose39uk

    Mongoose39uk Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    223
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Read it, read the links

    Your point is what exactly?
     
  13. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,572
    Likes Received:
    3,763
    Trophy Points:
    178
    edited due to misunderstanding.
     
  14. Mongoose39uk

    Mongoose39uk Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    223
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I was referring to the original post.

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
  15. Mongoose39uk

    Mongoose39uk Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    223
    Trophy Points:
    103
    What is fairly obvious to me is why it was posted in the way it was.

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
  16. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,572
    Likes Received:
    3,763
    Trophy Points:
    178
    edited that. :thumbup:

    I think it's to eat a healthy range of foods.
    From the list, they're all things I eat anyway, (apart from the brussel sprouts)

    Excellent sources of vitamin K include parsley, kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard, green beans, asparagus, broccoli, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, collard greens, thyme, romaine lettuce, sage, oregano, cabbage, celery, sea vegetables, cucumber, leeks, cauliflower, tomatoes, and blueberries.
     
  17. susanmanley

    susanmanley · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    596
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    38
    This is an interesting post.
    My husband has post polio syndrome and over the last few years has been suffering more and more. In July it all got too much and no help from doctors. We did our own research [which I normally do not recommend] and from this he stopped his statins. There was a dramatic improvement. He could walk much better and pain levels very reduced. He is still having problems but definitely not as bad.
    Mentioned this to the doctor who just said it was probably a good idea to stop them. When we asked why he hadn't said anything he just shrugged!!!
     
  18. Mongoose39uk

    Mongoose39uk Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    223
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I think I should have made it easier to see what I was referring to. :D


    I can't do with sprouts but the rest, yes please
     
  19. mcdonagh47

    mcdonagh47 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Since the statin users are on them because of raised cholesterol
    the result is actually a surrogate measure of the damage done by raised cholesterol.

    and of course there is no indication in the results whether the calcification took place BEFORE statins were started ( which is likely ) and whether the statins have helped to reduce or stabilise the rate of calcification.

    It is known that cholesterol deposited in the cusps or "leaflets" in the Aortic Valve triggers the start of Aortic stenosis (calcification of the important Aortic valve threatening sudden death ). Aortic stenosis in the heart valves is the equivalent of atherosclerosis of the arteries. And yes sufferers from Aortic stenosis are routinely prescribed statins to help reduce the assault of cholesterol on the heart valves.

    So you could do a study ( analogous to one at the start of the thread) of people taking statins and those not taking them and find that the rate of Aortic stenosis was much higher in the statin takers than in the non-statin users. Well of course it is - statins are part of the treatment !

    One of the major benefits of statins is that when atherosclerotic plaques are present in the arteries the statins help to form a cap or crust over them. This makes them much more stable and less likely for bits to break off and cause heart attacks etc. It is the unstable friable plaques that cause most damage.
     
  20. Mongoose39uk

    Mongoose39uk Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    223
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I know that, I am curious why what point the original poster was trying to make

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook