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Switching from Insulin injections to a pump?

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by cnh1986, Aug 19, 2013.

  1. cnh1986

    cnh1986 · Newbie

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    Hi All! I'm Chris and I've been diabetic type 1 for over 12 years now - and consistently been using insulin injections on a basal bolus regime. I have mostly had good control and generally have HBA1c results between 6 - 7.5, however I've constantly been asking my diabetes team (Salford, Greater Manchester) to have an insulin pump to help me achieve even better control and also to help minimise hypos (something I do have a problem with). However - I constantly am refused because my control is 'too good' or the latest is that pumps are not funded in this authority any more. Does anybody have experience of moving from injections to a pump - would be very interested to hear how you managed to achieve this switch and if it has benefited you.

    Many thanks in advance, Chris
     
  2. Lucypieee

    Lucypieee · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Chris, a lot of people find it to be a bit of a postcode lottery when it comes to having pumps funded, I was lucky and had no issues when I was switched over 6 weeks ago.
    Do you meet any of the NICE criteria? This is generally what your Care Team and the CCG will look at when it comes to funding. A copy of the criteria can be found on www.inputdiabetes.org.uk, I have mentioned this in several threads before, but if you're having problems with funding being declined then it may be worth you getting in touch with INPUT and seeing what advice they can give you.
    :)


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  3. Patch13

    Patch13 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Chris!

    I swapped to a pump about 1.5 years ago after having injections for about13 years.

    I got a pump after going on a DAFNE course where I was shown them (i had requested to go on the course due to having lots of hypos and highs and then after a lot of consideration thought that I would really like to see if a pump could improve my control / health). I qualified for the criteria as I had a huge amount of hypos even though my HBa1c was pretty good. It sounds like I was very lucky as I received a pump quickly after I requested one. However I am aware that some people really have to fight to get one.

    After having my pump I don't see myself ever going back to MDI. I like that I can bolus very small amounts of insulin and that I have been able to adjust my basal hour by hour. I also like the less injections.
    Sorry I can't be more helpful. I hope you manage to get a pump.
    Patch13


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  4. fractureman

    fractureman · Well-Known Member

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    Can't see you getting a pump with hba1c's as good as that. Your doing fine on mdi from the looks of it


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  5. Milliesmum

    Milliesmum · Newbie

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    Contact 'input', my daughter had good control but still wanted to move to a pump and input not only gave me excellent advice on how to approach the hospital and PCT for funding but also supplied a list of approved NHS pumps and offered advice on how to get the pump we wanted as oppose to the pump the hospital used. I cannot thank them enough. Millie has been on the Omnipod pump now for 5 weeks now and whilst we are having a few teething problems getting the background insulin right she hasn't had a single injection and can eat and pump whenever she wants. Good luck!
     
  6. ivinghoe

    ivinghoe Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was in a similar situation to you but eventually was approved for funding and I am now waiting for the funding from my CCG.
    I tried everything my clinic asked me too but eventually I was approved...

    It is a frustrating long winded process (for me anyways) especially when you see other users being offered a pump... there's many people who would love to be pumping and being denied a chance.
    Even if your Hba1c's are good, you still have a good case for a pump if you can show, as you mention, that you having a lot of hypos.
    You will eventually loose your hypo signs if you haven't already started doing so. This is a good case for asking for a pump especially as if they simply advise you to reduced your insulin doses you then run increased of complications which no one ever wants. Make sure they're fully aware of why your Hba1c's are "good" but you still need a pump.
    In my case I couldn't get a decent Hba1c without excessive hypos and now have virtually no hypo awareness left. I kept careful diaries...meter downloads as backup to show I was dedicated in trying get good control, they finally loaned me a CGM and the final piece of proof they needed was its downloaded data to finally apply for a funding me a pump.
    Dont give up keep at your team and take every opportunity to remind them you need a pump

    Hope this helps
    Alan
     
  7. laura220579

    laura220579 · Newbie

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    Just because u have a good hba1c, doesn't mean u wont be considered for a pump. There are plenty of other parts to the criteria than just hba1c. Check out the DAFNE website and see if that helps clear things up for you.
    I moved from mdi to insulin pump 3 months ago after being on mdi for 30 years and have never looked back. I'd claw anyone's eyes out if they ever tried taking it away from me :)
    Don't get me wrong, soooo much more work at the beginning until u get ur basal rates and carb ratios sorted out. More testing bgs as well.
    I wouldn't advise anyone to get the pump unless u r willing to put the time and effort in because it would just be pointless as u have no long acting insulin running in the background as a safety net. Basically u can be in DKA within 4 hrs if u are what I call "a lazy diabetic" meaning u don't take it seriously or take care of yourself properly.
    Good luck with whatever u choose. For me? The pump is def the way forward :)

    Laura x


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  8. Trina

    Trina Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    What can I say, but from the first day I've been on the pump I've never looked back. I think this is the most spectacular wonderful device ever. I personally didn't have any problems getting a pump funded but I had decided that if my local hospital wouldn't fund it I was going to take a loan and fund it myself, that's how desperate I was.

    That said I haven't looked back. Good luck
     
  9. EchoIsGreat

    EchoIsGreat · Member

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    Hi, new NICE criteria states funding can't be reason for a pump refusal. There are no PCT's anymore and there is a push to provide more pumps in this country as we are falling behind the rest of the world in pump use. I've been given a pump for 2 years as part of the REPOSE trial which started me on a pump and an adapted DAFNE course for pump users. So far it has changed my life and I can't see ever wanting to go back to injections. Studies have shown that there is not a lot of difference between outcomes of pump users and those on MDI's. However those on pumps do have fewer hypos and better overall control and are a lot happier and positive about their diabetes. Certainly after 30 years of injections and HBA1c's between 6.5 and 8, I have never slept or felt better after being on the pump for only 7 months. There is no harm asking for a pump, times are changing and it is the future (well that's my opinion, my hospital consultant and my chemist.). Good luck.


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