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Symptons of hypo at 4.8?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by lynbrown, Jan 4, 2016.

  1. lynbrown

    lynbrown · Well-Known Member

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    A couple of times recently I have had shaky arms and legs plus lethargy despite being higher than 4.0. Can you get a hypo at 4.8?
     
  2. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Not technically, no. But remember meters aren't 100% accurate so your blood sugar may be a little lower than that.

    Also, if your blood sugar is dropping quickly, the meter may not accurately reflect that, so you could feel a bit hypo.

    Finally, if your sugars have been running high for a while, you can get what are called 'false hypos' as your body isn't accustomed to more normal sugar levels.
     
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  3. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    I believe it is possible to have hypo symptoms at relatively high bgl readings like 4.8, and it is usually associated with a sudden drop in bgl if you have normally been running high levels. It is more like a shock response rather than a clinical hypo. Have you changed medication or diet recently?

    The other possibility is that your meter may be reading high. I have two meters that I run in parallel, and one is always 2 or 3 mmol higher than the other. So when I had one reading 2.1 the other was reading 5.3 Also, I can get a 1 or 2 mmol jump in readings when I change pack of strips, which is why I run two meters so I can detect this and allow for it.

    Meters nowadays are suppposed to conform to an ISO standard that requires an accuracy of + /- 20% so when taking a reading that is really 4/0 mmol/L then any reading between 3.2 and 4.8 is acceptable. The ISO standard is shortky to be updated and meters will need to be accurate to + / - 15% from 2016 onwards

    Just to complicate matters,older meters used to be calibrated for blood plasma levels (i,e fingerpricking) but meters that can be used with alternate sites are nowadays calibrated for whole blood and will read higher by a factor of 1.12
     
    #3 Oldvatr, Jan 4, 2016 at 11:53 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 3, 2016
  4. CollieBoy

    CollieBoy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The feelings of these "false hypos" can be more to do with relative BG levels. If you drop from 10.8 to 4.8 then the drop is more likely to feel like a "hypo" than if you fall from a usual 5.8 to 3.8.
    @lynbrown what are your normal BG figures?
     
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  5. mfactor

    mfactor Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    False Hypo as Azure said is my guess as well..............

    Also I use an Aviva meter and in reference to what Oldvatr said I went on their website and ordered some calibration fluid to check my meter was reading correctly, and to my surprise it was free..............
     
  6. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    I have had over 10 meters in my diabetic phase, and I do the calibration fluid check on all of them, and I have never had a meter fail. Unfortunately the range of acceptable values is so large that it does not actually verify the meter accuracy. If the calibration fluid came with a titrated value that is certified, then the calibration check might have some validity to it. I use it for finding gross error perhaps due to battery problem, but it does not give me much confidence when checking my bgl near the hypo danger area. I use the HBA1c value and my average plasma level to verify my meter at a spot reading taken at the same time. I also average all my readings to reduce noise and to detect mis readings, I have one meter that is quite stable and a second meter that misreads quite often so I use the second meter as a sanity check, and the first meter for basing any decisions I make regarding my therapy or diet. ButI am always aware that neither meter is perfect, and I use trend analysis to base my therapy on long term. So far my analysis has detected one pack of out-of-date reboxed test strips, and one set of counterfeit strips that I bought online in the last 6 months.
     
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  7. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    As a type 1, to do all the calibration and checking that @Oldvatr undertakes would drive you nuts, as you are testing typically 6-10 times daily every day of your life.

    Sure, check your meter and make sure you are confident in its values, but once you've done this, stick with it and familiarise yourself with how it reads in comparison to how you feel.

    Make sure you have a spare in case of issues with the first.

    Back to your question though, all the previous correspondents are correct. There could be a number of reasons why you felt as you did and only you know where your levels are and how 4.8 comparies to your average.
     
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  8. Bogusman

    Bogusman Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well, as we all know Diabetes doesn't go by the rules, it has a warped mind of it's own. I sometimes get low bs feelings, (kind of like butterflies in my stomach) when I check to see what it is it can be as high as 4.5, yet there are other times I check it, without having any major signs, and it can be as low as 2.6. They say you lose the sensations the longer you have Diabetes, in my case almost 31 years, which is probably true, but I think there is too much to work out, so we just have to try and get on with it :~|
     
  9. Natalielw

    Natalielw Type 1 · Member

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    Everyone feels a low kicking in at a different level. I start shaking at about 5! Which is a good thing, because im prepared for it and I'm not letting it get too low
     
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  10. MrDieselx

    MrDieselx · Member

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    i can get the shakes as low as 5.1, went to bed with blood at 9.1 tonight and only took 15 units of insulin rapid which should have lowered my blood to 6/7. just woke up covered in sweat and shaky, blood was 4.5 so nommed some glucose and some fruit.

    but yes my bloods have been running between 9-20 for over a year. so i would think since they have been high for so long im getting the false hypos at below 6 sometimes.
     
  11. danielcvs

    danielcvs Type 1 · Member

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    Some times, even although you blood sugar is high, if it is decreasing you can feel the same symptoms as an hypo. It happens to me when I have a high blood sugar and then take the insulin, when it starts to decrease I feel hypo symptoms but I'm not in a hypo.
     
  12. cathat23

    cathat23 · Member

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    Thanks . I love the dog by the way , he looks just like my real boy.
     
  13. cathat23

    cathat23 · Member

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    Hi , I too have unsettling symptoms, I've recently been diagnosed as pre diabetic, and told to come back in a YEAR. for another check up. I've changed Gps. My Granddaughter is type 1 . I checked my blood a couple of months ago and it was 6.9. But recently I've felt shaky and faint, and like I'm walking through Mud, usually after a walk with my dogs ,or when late for a meal. Is what I'm experiencing low B Sugar ?

    C x
     
  14. CollieBoy

    CollieBoy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Know what you mean I've 2 collies, one a young & skinny tricolour, an one an old and fluffy red P1010039 (WinCE).JPG
     
  15. bigboi

    bigboi Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Technically no, u can feel just like it though.. I used to have this before only got better when i handled my levels better, which is not happening now >: (
     
  16. Sally49

    Sally49 Type 2 · Member

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    I get hypos at anywhere in the 4. range, but then my blood sugar is always very high. I'm type 2 but insulin dependent. I think the posts on here talking about sudden drops bringing on hypo symptoms are ringing very true. All about the balance I guess...
     
  17. Mep

    Mep Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    We're all different with what number we start to hypo on. My endo has taught me I need to know my 'safe' number and stay above it at all times. He worked that out with me and he said my safe number is 5. What that means is if I fall below 5, I am at high risk of hypo because usually my sugar level drops quite fast under 5 and I can be in the 3's before I know it or as low as 2.1 (that is my lowest I've been on my meter). Also my endo said there is no such thing as a false hypo as I did question him about it previously. He commented that if your body is reacting you have already lost your judgment. That means you can't drive or do anything that puts the safety of yourself or others at risk. The last thing to return after treating a hypo is your judgment as well. He told me to never ignore my hypo symptoms and I must treat. You may be 4.8 now for example, but in 10 mins you could be 3.9 or lower. The idea is to bring your sugar level back up past your safe number.
     
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  18. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    Hi All. I get shaky, feel sick, light headed and have a cold sweat and I know then my blood sugar is going to be around the 3.8 - 4.0 mark. I chew on 4 or 6 glucose tablets, keeping them in my mouth and under my tongue for rapid absorption into my blood, this works for me. Then I bring forward my next meal if it's nearing the time, or just have a quick sandwich. I've only been on Insulin for 18 months and had hypo's. I am Type 2 and take 2000mg Metformin and 5mg Dapagliflozin and 40 Units of Humulin I - have had Diabetes nearly 16 years in May.
     
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  19. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    I have reported this on several other threads now, and I bring it up again here since it may be relevant, and that is to do with how our bgl meters are calibrated. Older meters used to be calibrated for the interstitial fluid that comes out when we finger prick (also called 'whole blood'). Modern meters are being calibrated for plasma levels, so that they correlate better to the venous blood that the HbA1c is measured from.

    Thus a modern meter will probably read 12% higher than an older meter. Thus if you used to experience hypo symptoms at 4 mmol/L on an older meter, then it will now start at 4.8 mmol/L on a new meter. Conversly, if you used to use a level of 5mmol/L as being your safety limit, then you should be looking at a new limit of 6. This does not include variance due to meter accuracy, but will apply to most currently available meters. This is a calibration change, so all readings will shift by a factor of x1.12

    Also, not all meters have been changed. i know for a fact that most Accucheck meters have changed since 2011, and my SD Codefree is defintely plasma compatible. However my older Xceed (given to me in 2014) is whole blood, as is the replacement Xceed (received Sep2015), but also my new Neo (received Sep 2015). So it would seem that Abbott meters have not changed.

    I got a hypo the other day. My Neo read 3.7, my SD on the same blood drop read 6.1. My body said 'Feed me Seymour, Feed me NOW'

    One important bit of info to take on board, and that is that the NICE ranges and targets and the Newbie information for new starters seem to be both quoting values for older meters, and are 12% lower than the new meters,
    trying a tag to @DCUK Jessica (Meter researcher apparently)
     
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    #19 Oldvatr, Feb 3, 2016 at 12:47 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 3, 2016
  20. Mep

    Mep Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you on that :)

    Yes the discussion I had about my 'safe' number was with the use of my current meters.

    But very good point to factor in checking how your meter is calibrated as there can be quite a difference if using different meters. I usually stick to the same meter. I'm about to try the Dario one though as soon as I can get a hold of some test strips.
     
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