1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

T1 refused insulin repeat prescription - Twitter thread

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by LittleGreyCat, Sep 30, 2021.

  1. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,927
    Likes Received:
    2,236
    Trophy Points:
    198
    https://twitter.com/CaisterClara/status/1443272924954337280?s=20

    This seems to have been fixed, but is an alarming cautionary tale.

    There should be no way that a repeat prescription of a life saving drug should be refused until a test has been taken, whatever the circumstances.

    Posting it here so that people in general are aware.
     
    • Informative Informative x 3
    • Agree Agree x 2
  2. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,913
    Likes Received:
    2,471
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Thanks for posting @LittleGreyCat, it doesn't surprise me that much. In fact when I went to re order my last repeat prescription online, they had taken off my novarapid. I added a little note requesting the novarapid along with my Lantus which was still on there and also asking them to put it back on the repeat for next time. Got to the pharmacist....no novarapid waiting for me. Off to the actual surgery where the conversation with the receptionist went like this, me, 'my novarapid was taken off my repeat prescription', her, 'Let me check..oh yes', me, 'I need some more', her 'Yep, I'll request the GP to do another prescription, it'll take up to a week'. Luckily I did have enough to last me a couple of weeks but the point is they really don't understand how anxious we get when we are about to run out. I know that if I'd needed it there and then the GP would have rushed to get me some, they're really good but it's the casualness of some people that is annoying. Incidentally the reason it had automatically been taken off was because my last order had been more than 12 months ago, back then they'd given me 3/4 boxes which had lasted me a year as I use about one pen a month.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,671
    Likes Received:
    11,625
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi,

    I tend to have a med review with my GP once a year?
    Lol, one time with a new GP he asked. "Do you still need insulin??" :banghead:

    Oddly, I notice I've had the Lantus reusable pen AllStar pro removed from the list.. Presumably I haven't ordered one in over 3 years..
    I would probably need to explain what it was & put in a special order, if I did need another spare.

    Ah, the mother writes on a Tweet "GP has said cause she hasn’t had a checkup with them she can’t have anymore repeat prescriptions, but her consultant does all this."

    This may well explain how it all went wrong.. No GP med review??
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,092
    Likes Received:
    1,863
    Trophy Points:
    198
    The last time I went to the pharmacist to get insulin he told me I could be ordering more bottles of the stuff than the 2 x 10ml that I usually get.
    I did get into trouble once when the prescription came back with short acting insulin pens rather than lantus.
    Thought I could manage with short acting until the mistake was resolved and ended up DKA and being very told off for taking up an acute care bed. Ironically I am now on 24/7 short acting via the pump of course.
    But yes agree that it is ignorance that would lead to someone being denied a regular life sustaining medication whose absence leads to such an acute decline in health for a type 1.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    846
    Likes Received:
    1,152
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Here is a letter (edited!) which I wrote 9 years ago to the Complaints Manager of our Surgery Pharmacy:

    19th November 2012
    Dear Ms,
    Thank you for taking the trouble to write to me on 16th November and for clarifying matters raised in my letter to J C.
    As a patient who relies on Insulin being available at all times, I'm sure you appreciate the perception of the Pharmacy system from the user's viewpoint. On being told that even Insulin had been controlled by a quota, I felt that to do nothing was not far short of irresponsible. However, from your explanation it is now clear to me that the problem is essentially external. I would suggest that any patient on life-saving medication needs assurance that they are not cut adrift, purely because of financial considerations.

    Those "financial considerations", as outlined in her letter of the 16th effectively said that once the Surgery had reached its quota of insulin and test strips, they were allowed to sell any other stock abroad, since it would gain better prices! My immediate thoughts and response was that if I wanted to live in the USA and risk dying in the gutter, I would have moved over there...
     
    • Winner x 4
    • Like x 2
    • Informative x 2
    • Agree x 1
    • Creative x 1
  6. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    Likes Received:
    550
    Trophy Points:
    173
    I have a med review every year. I suspect it is a regulatory requirement for all repeat prescriptions.
    Thankfully, I don't have to attend the surgery. I just have to phone and remind the receptionist to give a GP a nudge to tick a box.
    A few things have been removed from my script when I haven't ordered them for 12 months like backup insulin pens in case my pump fails. But these were readded and surgery procedures were changed after a polite but firm phone call to the prescribing pharmacist.

    Unfortunately, I think these procedures are dictated to the surgery from on high and they need to be reminded how to play the game, sometimes.
    Like most things, arguing with the receptionist is a waste of energy. A friendly call to get them on your side to fight the battle with their colleagues on your behalf is far more productive.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. sleepster

    sleepster Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    304
    Trophy Points:
    123
    This used to happen to me all the time at my old GPs but it was a prescription review that was needed, not blood tests. Every 6 months they were required and every 6 months my mum would have to ring and argue with them. At that point my prescription was insulin, test strips, ketone strips, lancets. They would say "well we need to make sure those items are still needed".
    I've also had a pharmacist refuse to give me an emergency supply of lantus when I had to stop using my pump so I had 2.5 days of constant novorapid injections. Lesson learned though.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Camoo

    Camoo Prediabetes · Active Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    23
    I just can't understand this, what is wrong with health care providers. Apart from potential life threatening consequences, what about the the stress of having to constantly battle, wrangle to receive a decent standard of care
     
    • Agree Agree x 9
  9. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,092
    Likes Received:
    1,863
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I can understand the need for meds reviews as many people suffer from taking too many medications and of course that also means it is vastly inefficient so there should be a push for de prescribing just not insulin for type 1 diabetics. Unless we are mice we haven't been cured yet!! I am also worried that this is symptom of there being more type 2s who need to go onto insulin hence the confusion at the surgeries and at the pharmacists. It is possible for a type 2 to not need insulin anymore.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    876
    Likes Received:
    501
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I lost lancets off a repeat prescription and it took 3 months and a fax from the consultant before they went back on. When I complained they put Lantus back on - both begin with an L I guess.

    Got through because manufacturer sent me some freebies
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. StewM

    StewM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    119
    Trophy Points:
    63
    This happened to me recently. Luckily, I spotted it quite early. Took ages to get an appointment. When I finally got one, I missed the call (as they insisted it must be a phone appointment, but also refused to give me a time to expect the call). When I noticed I'd got a call, whilst I was in the shower (of course), I also found a voicemail from my Doctor.

    He said this, clearly reading the notes at the same time: "I have no idea why they want me to do this, and it's a complete waste of everyone's time, sorry. Written you a prescription. And I've put a note on your record that's highly unlikely you'll randomly stop being diabetic any time soon, unfortunately."
     
    • Like Like x 5
    • Funny Funny x 3
  12. JMK1954

    JMK1954 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    233
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I really like your doctor's reply ! It sounds like a 'the lunatics are running the asylum' situation'.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. StewM

    StewM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    119
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Yeah, when I first met him, it was a bit intimidating how direct and abrupt he is, but it's something I really like about him now I'm used to it.
     
  14. AloeSvea

    AloeSvea Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes Received:
    1,701
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Yes indeed, we really really really want our health care professionals to know the difference between an autoimmune disease and a metabolic disease - if they don't get it - who will??!! I often wish I could go back in time and make it not so that these two different diseases with a same/similar symptom got given the same word...
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    846
    Likes Received:
    1,152
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I fully sympathise, but we could be having a worse time in some other well known countries! We need to hang on to the NHS , but as @NicoleC1971 says, the providers need to avoid wastage. There is still far too much of it. It doesn't help that if you take a prescription home and find an item is wrong, it can't be repackaged for the right person!
     
  16. JMK1954

    JMK1954 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    233
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I have always insisted on picking up my repeat prescriptions myself since my husband picked up insulin for me and it was not the right one, This was a few years ago when bovine insulin was still available. I was dispensed a 30/70 mixture instead of Hypurin Bovine Lente which I was expecting. The young pharmacist argued with me when I got to the shop ! I think he was a locum.
    Since that point, I have always unpacked the pharmacy bag before I leave the shop. It saves a repeat trip if there has been an error and saves waste within the shop. The staff at my branch of Boots always show me the insulin before putting it into a bag, on the grounds that I know what it is supposed to be. That suits me.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  17. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,917
    Likes Received:
    2,559
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I want to point out that insulin for type 2 diabetics can be just as important. I am uncomfortable with the idea that all type 2 diabetics are safe from harm if they don't get meds, particularly if high blood sugar levels can cause a cascade of other life threatened conditions, including mental health issues.

    I feel that there is a certain amount of dismissiveness in some posters concerning the severity of type 2 diabetes for many.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,671
    Likes Received:
    11,625
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi,

    This sounds to me more like an error with the dispensing pharmacist & not at the GP's end?
    Lol, yep. I tend to check the bag contents prior to leaving the counter too.. :)

    Yep, gotta be said. Prescribed meds are prescribed for a reason. Unless there is a medical professional review ascertaining if the patient needs them anymore in the daily course of treatment.

    There does seem to be a "protocol" these days regarding cutting the patient off from a script.
    It's quite possible it has been put in place to stop patients falling through the net regarding consistent health care?
    But it would be better if the surgery communicated with the patient rather than them finding out down the chemist a couple of days later??

    A few years back picking up a prescription I was pulled into a side room by a pharmasist checking I knew how to use my meds?
    Safe to say I'd only been "doing this for nearly 40 years" at the time.. but it was nice to know the guy cared..
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

    Messages:
    11,730
    Likes Received:
    22,870
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I know this is off topic but it is suprising to know that people we asume don't care actually do.
    Daughter had a PIP assesment a week oe so ago by phone got through it ok and put it out of mind.
    Several days after she recieved a phone call from the lady who did the assesment as she was concerned and wanted to make sure my daughter was alright and managing her meds OK sure suprised me.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  20. Riva_Roxaban

    Riva_Roxaban Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,337
    Likes Received:
    2,408
    Trophy Points:
    158
    The pharmacy I have gone to for many years is a bit like that as well, both of the pharmasists have been there for years as owners of the franchise there, and have come out and explained about any new medication I have been prescribed.

    It's a bit harder now I get my medication delivered, but there is a note left in the MedAdvisor app which I order my scripts through about any contraindications that may happen.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook