1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

thirsty and really worried

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by rachelbriggsoliver, Dec 3, 2013.

  1. rachelbriggsoliver

    rachelbriggsoliver · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    hello everyone, I've been really worried these past few days since i was given a prediabetic diagnosis by my dr. He's advised weight loss ( I'm 5'5 and 11 stone 10 ) and low GI diet plus exercise. Last night I had a terrible night, was constantly thirsty and waking up to go to the toilet at least 5 times and had tingly hands. I'm worried that waiting three months to see him again may be too long, that perhaps I have pancreatic cancer and need more tests. Is it normal with prediabetics to feel so thirsty and anxious and could i be allowing more damage to occur if I'm left 'untreated' ? Since I went to the dr's, I've had NO sugar and NO carbs at all but still feel so tired and thirsty. Do you think I should buy a glucose tester to keep checking my blood sugar level? I have an extremely busy week at work this week and I'm worried that it's all getting too much. Thank you for answering.
     
  2. carraway

    carraway Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    976
    Likes Received:
    717
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Hi

    You should get an appointment to see a GP or at least a nurse and they can do a quick finger prick test to look at your sugar levels. That will put your mind at rest.

    No carbs at all? That sounds tricky, what have you been eating? I am a fan of low carb but not no carb.

    An SD Codefree meter is about the cheapest there is to buy and the trips are the lowest price. Maybe your mind would be put to rest.

    You are not massively overweight so take it easy.
    Pancreatic Cancer is very unlikely. You'd feel a damn site worse, my mother had it

    Let us know how you get on


    Cara
     
  3. rachelbriggsoliver

    rachelbriggsoliver · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    thanks Cara,
    I know I'm a bit of a hypochondriac always thinking the worst. I've had such stress recently what with having to look after my mum whose been ill and is also disabled after suffering a stroke about 6 years ago. I seem to be talking myself into the worst scenarios and get very anxious and panicky which I guess makes things worse too.
    Well, I'm new to this no carbs GI thing, I'll tell you what I head yesterday.
    Breakfast; 4 small plums
    Lunch: tuna salad with carrot, lettuce, spring onion, fennel, tomato, chick peas and a dash of olive oil.
    Afternoon snack: half a banana
    Dinner: chilli made with lean mince, tomatoes, onion, red kidney beans. ( no pasta or rice with it )
    Then a couple of cups of tea and plenty of water all day.
    How do you think that sounds?
    Thanks for getting back to me, I've just made myself so worried about it all and feel worn out.
    Rachel
     
  4. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    26,459
    Likes Received:
    4,871
    Trophy Points:
    248
    Hi Rachel and welcome to the forum :)

    Your diet does contain some carbs and members will be along soon to tell you how many and where they are. In the meantime, here is the information we give to new members which should be useful to you, regardless of whether you are diagnosed or not. Ask more questions and someone will have an answer for you.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find well over 70,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes ... rains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips
    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  5. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,585
    Likes Received:
    3,768
    Trophy Points:
    178
    That was all the food all day?

    I'm on a low cal diet, not low carb, it was about 800 to 1200 cal a day, but since the weather has changed it's at least 1200 calories now.
    I plan for a slightly larger breakfast,
    say two Ryvita, with a bit of ham and cheese.
    A mid morning snack, fruit or Muller Light.
    Lunch, similar to yours.
    Mid afternoon snack, again, Muller Light or fruit.
    Dinner, similar to yours.
    Maybe a snack about 8 ish.

    Like you tea, coffee, other drinks in the day.

    If you're exercising it's important not to eat too little, and space out what you do eat in smaller portions, but more frequent.
    Keeps the GL down as well for me.

    I have a meter to check my bs, and know which foods are good and bad for me.

    What is your target weight?
    I lost about 4 stones, and am about 1/2 a stones from where I want to be.
     
  6. rachelbriggsoliver

    rachelbriggsoliver · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi Douglas,
    yes, that's what I had. I forgot to mention I had a bit of crumbled lancashire cheese on top of the chilli too.
    I'd like to lose a stone to a stone and a half in weight.
    I think one of my main issues now is that I tend to dwell on the negative, creating all sorts of what if scenarios in my mind ( especially when I wake up at 4 in the morning ).
    I'm just hoping that with diet and exercise I can get this under control and not have to go on more medication. ( I am already on high blood pressure meds )
    I've just ordered a glucose meter today so hopefully that will help too.
     
  7. collectingrocks

    collectingrocks · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    101
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Hi Rachel

    Do not panic. You have obviously had a lot of stress lately and you need a bit of "me" time. Try not to drink too much near bedtime as you really need to sleep properly without toilet disruptions :lol: .

    Things like your Mueller Lite yoghurt contain sugar. Unfortunately most of our food these days has "hidden sugars". Look at the labels in the supermarket, you'll be surprised how much sugar is in packaged/processed stuff. You might have to rethink about some of the things in your diet. The "low calorie" maxim does not work. You need to eat, but the right foods.

    You have received good advice so far, so keep checking back on this forum. Hope you get your meter soon and there are always members here to give advice on how to use it...etc...

    This is a good time to sort yourself out "now", rather than wait untill its too late.
     
  8. Carbdodger

    Carbdodger · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38

    Hello there
    Beware of the hidden carbs!!
    The little devils lurk where you don't always look!
    For example the plums could have been around 20 g of carb depending on type, ripeness etc. if you are really intolerant that could have an adverse impact. Personally I'm very sensitive to carbs first thing so stick with eggs with things like mushrooms or bacon or spinach or avocado.
    Kidney beans are high in carbs as well why not substitute with a portion of green veg on the side.
    Check out carb values in the Little Gem calorie counter.
    Cd
     
  9. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,585
    Likes Received:
    3,768
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Muller Light.
    typical fruit yoghurt.

    per 100g

    Protein 4.2g
    Carbs, 7.6g
    or which sugars 7.1g
    Fat 0.1g

    The sugar is mainly fructose,

    so per pot,
    13.3g carbs
    12.4g of which are sugar.

    Low calorie has worked very well for me, I've lost 4 stone, got my bs down to a very good level. reduced my meds, and still eat a balanced healthy diet.
    Eat to your meter, if it doesn't cause your bs to increase, it's not a "bad" food.
    Plums are ok for me, as are some beans.
    I avoid, processed food like bacon, I avoid high fat food, I avoid too many eggs, but eat lots of fresh veg, and homecooked meals so I know what's in them.
    For any number of diabetics, you'll find any number of different diets.

    As for hidden sugars, like the yoghurt, it's clear on the label.
     
  10. rachelbriggsoliver

    rachelbriggsoliver · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Thank you everyone, your answers have been really helpful.
    I had natural greek yogurt which says 5 g sugar per 100 so I'm hoping that's OK?
    There does seem to be so much conflicting evidence and opinion as to what is 'good' and 'bad' to eat, especially in the fruit department. Does anyone recommend a really good book or online source of GI and sugar values of a wide range of foods?
     
  11. carraway

    carraway Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    976
    Likes Received:
    717
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I love 'Carbs and cals', nothing about GI but really useful, Full of pictures which I thought was a gimmick but is actually really useful, especially if you like generous portions! Has fat and fibre too.

    Carbs like hiding!
     
  12. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

    Messages:
    10,689
    Likes Received:
    6,674
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi Your diet isn't too bad. Go for low-carb not low-calorie; the calorie impact of foods varies greatly on the food type. Yes, watch out for sugary yoghurts. I have Irish 0%/0% fruit yoghurts which have sweeteners apart from the fruit sugars. Don't let people scare you about artificial sweeteners in the small quantity you would consume; sugar is the enemy particularly fructose when added. Fat is OK in sensible quantities (fat doesn't make you fat) and isn't directly the cause of cholesterol in the blood which is driven by the liver. Bacon etc is fine in sensible quantities. Note that bananas are quite high carb and GI so other fruits are better. I'm sure with your diet approach you will lose weight and with a meter you can check how you are doing.
     
  13. Pompeygirl

    Pompeygirl · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    38
    If u have an iphone there is an app called GI diet helper. I have found this helpful


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  14. rachelbriggsoliver

    rachelbriggsoliver · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    thanks everyone for all your advice.
    I bought a meter and after a week of no bread, pasta, rice lots of fresh fruit and veg my reading was 5.4 after a 12 hour fast. Just tested again this morning after another week of watching the diet and it was 6.3 after a 12 hour fast. Not sure why it's gone up. I have to go back to the Dr's at the end of Feb and I'm hoping by then I'll see a big difference and have this under control. I'm still getting my head round the diet change though and think I'm probably eating too much fruit ( oranges and apples mainly ) as a snack/ food substitute.Perhaps I should try testing after foods too to see how they effect me?
     
  15. Jamrox

    Jamrox Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,166
    Likes Received:
    4,346
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Oranges send my sugar up. I tend to eat blueberries or raspberry now . Expensive but better than feeling ill.

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  16. Thommothebear

    Thommothebear Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,186
    Likes Received:
    1,056
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I would seriously recommend you don't neglect the exercise advice, it does make a huge difference and although it may be hard initially it very rapidly becomes easier. In fact it helps with a lot of ailments and also with the way you feel emotionally.
     
  17. ani010

    ani010 Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    67
    Trophy Points:
    58
    This is exactly how my diabetes started, after two blood tests, one 20 and the second 23 my doctor said that i was type two and sent me home told to change my diet. Three weeks later after a prick test at tescos chemist my bgl was 31.9 and i ended up in hospital on a drip and was diagnosed type one. Its just two months on and with great support from my diabetic specialist nurse and my wonderfull husband im doing very well.

    So if u havrnt already please please dont leave it, go and get a prick test and see a doctor. Good luck xxx
     
  18. Gardengnome

    Gardengnome Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    57
    Trophy Points:
    68
    The amount of 'hidden' sugar in low fat fruit yogurts is terrifying, especially the Muller ones. I buy Morrisons own brand of Greek yogurt, plain and add my own flavours. They do a low fat one and a full fat one for comparison. The full fat one has more calories per 100 gr but less sugar than the low fat and it tastes better.
     
  19. lizbet9

    lizbet9 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Many pharmacies offer free diabetes tests! Xx
     
  20. sugartoohigh

    sugartoohigh Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    62
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Rachel the last 6 weeks my thrust and water intake (never was a tea or coffee person) has gone down. But I only started changing my diet since being told in Oct this year I've type 2. I could drink up to 5 litres of a day and visit the WC as many times. But cutting out diary (I never really had a high carbs diet in the form of veg) seems to of had some effect on me. I could drink 2 pints a day. I'm on about 1 1/2 of water a day now. I'm feeling better for it but not out of the woods yet. My body is still trying to find a happy medium. Stick at it :)
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook