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Treg, T4, fat cells?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by LittleGreyCat, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am currently reading the email roundup for the year from Charlotte.

    This contains two articles about research relating to T regulator cells (Treg) in fat cells.

    One article says that obesity reduces the number of Treg cells in your fat. As Treg reduces inflamation in fat cells then lower concentrations of Treg lead to more inflamation which leads to insulin resistance. Increasing the concentration of Treg cells in fat can decrease insulin resistance and combat the onset of T2. Sounds promising.

    The second article is about age related T2 development in people who are not obese. Apparently this is due to Treg cells. With age, the concentration of Treg cells increases in body fat and can lead to age related T2 - with the suggestion that this is classified as T4. Blocking Treg cells can prevent the development of age related T2.

    Oh, and I think I also saw elsewhere that adding Treg cells may reverse T1 in some cases?

    Can all these things be true?
     
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  2. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Other · Well-Known Member

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    Please check what you wrote since I think you introduced a contradiction. In the third para you say <<Increasing the concentration of Treg cells in fat can decrease insulin resistance and combat the onset of T2. Sounds promising.>> but later on you state <<With age, the concentration of Treg cells increases in body fat and can lead to age related T2>>. Sorry to be a pedant, but if one of these is incorrect, then it may be copied further on into the thread when others post a reply.
     
  3. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Oldvatr
    You spotted the contradiction.
    Yes, the two articles seem to say that Treg cells can cause T2 if you have a lot or a few.

    That was (with respect) exactly why I posted the question!
     
  4. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Other · Well-Known Member

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    My apologies. At least it is now clear that we should not take these reports as gospel just yet. I did read the reports in Charlotte's posting, but I had not immediately seen a contradiction. But your query made it obvious Sorry if I was clumsy in my response to you. Certainly it seems that the contradiction is not a typo.

    I can remember researching the Krebs cycle / citric cycle that described how glucogen is switched in an out of the fat cells and muscles. The switching mechanism was inferred 10 years ago,but had no name. Seems that this switch is now called Treg. When i researched the cycle, the actual hormone /amino acid that controlled the switch was not identified. The switch is a 3-way one, and insulin controls the storage of glucogen into a fat cell, and adrenaline controls taking it out and passing it to the muscles to be used as energy, and the 3rd path that uses glucogen directly bypassing the fat cell store. But there are other modes that allow fat and cholesterol to be used instead of glucose (i.e. ketogenic) and it was this control mechanism that had not been identified. Maybe this new research brings us closer to identifying it so science can synthesise / block it.
     
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