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Type 1: 6 Month Tour of Europe

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by poacher_joe, Oct 16, 2016.

  1. poacher_joe

    poacher_joe Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi All

    Firstly thank you for looking at my thread; I have a question regarding travelling and the cost of prescriptions.

    I currently live the U.K and I plan on travelling round Europe between March-August 2017. I will mainly be travelling via air travel, coach and train, and staying in Hostels. My previous excursions were one week in duration as a result my prescriptions would last the entire trip. But due to my travel plans being longer than a month in duration will I be entitled to prescriptions on my travels. If so will the cost be entirely covered by the NHS? And also how would I order a prescription?

    I have read a few webpages but have found no real substance to answer my question. I am aware that some countries in the EEU do not accept the EHIC card, so this question does not apply to these.

    Current Medication:

    Accu-Chek Mobile device – Cassettes and lancets
    Lantus Pen
    Humalog

    I would be grateful should any of you guys of encountered this, or have advice on what I could do.


    Joe
     
  2. Jay-Marc

    Jay-Marc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The NHS will in general provide medications for pre-existing conditions for 3 months, either by giving UK prescriptions to cover the period or if necessary 'cross-border' ones that can be filled in the country you are visiting. Beyond 3 months you are supposed to register for a doctor in the country you are visiting and pay yourself as necessary.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. asparagusp

    asparagusp · Guest

    "Beyond 3 months you are supposed to register for a doctor in the country you are visiting and pay yourself as necessary." And presumably claim any medical expenses outside that three month period when you return?
     
  4. Jay-Marc

    Jay-Marc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You are not supposed to be able to recover any costs beyond 3 months from the NHS or via the EHIC.
     
  5. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Could you not just get your dr to give you 3 months worth of stuff on one repeat, take 3 months worth with you and then, at the half way point, either pop back and collect another 3 months worth or get someone to fill your repeat and come to meet you?

    Obviously you would have to be careful about storing your insulin when travelling.

    Have a chat to your GP or diabetic team to see what they suggest is the best way of doing it?
     
  6. poacher_joe

    poacher_joe Type 1 · Active Member

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    @asparagusp @Jay-Marc thanks for the response, I have seen some countries require a payment such as 5% of the overall cost. Are you able to recover these costs upon returning?

    The point made about 3months coverage, if I was to travel for 3 months and then return home how long will i need to be in the U.K for the 3 months to begin again? Alternatively would there be a travel insuurer who would cover costs?
     
  7. Jay-Marc

    Jay-Marc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Travel insurers are usually not that keen on covering the cost of ongoing treatment for pre-existing conditions.

    Even your doctor giving you 3 months supply is a bit discretionary (ie you might be asked about it) and he/she might question doing it again quickly. Or maybe not.
     
  8. poacher_joe

    poacher_joe Type 1 · Active Member

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    I think I will talk to my nurse tomorrow, I just do not want this to stop me doing what I want to do :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Jay-Marc

    Jay-Marc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds a good idea.
     
  10. poacher_joe

    poacher_joe Type 1 · Active Member

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    have you been travelling before? if so what is the best way of keeping insulin safe?
     
  11. Jay-Marc

    Jay-Marc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't use insulin so can't advise on this from experience I'm afraid. Sure someone else will be though
     
    #12 Jay-Marc, Oct 16, 2016 at 4:48 PM
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2016
  12. ChrisSamsDad

    ChrisSamsDad Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Doesn't help your situation, but I went to Venice a few years back and forgot my Metformin, I went to a local chemist while I was there to see if I could get it over the counter - no problem at all, and it cost.....£1.10 for a month's supply. I know you can get many meds in various european countries without prescription, it might be worth checking.

    If it's France or the Netherlands you're going to, these might help:
    http://www.coffeeandinsulin.com/2015/01/getting-insulin-abroad-france/
    http://www.coffeeandinsulin.com/2015/02/getting-insulin-abroad-netherlands/
     
  13. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Lots of people use frio wallets - I've never used one tho.

    Edit: there's a good chance im spelling it wrong too!
     
  14. S2A

    S2A Type 1 · Member

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    Hello Joe,

    I just found this thread. It seems like it hasn't been updated for a while, but if you're travelling in 2017, I might still be of help :)

    Regarding the renewal of your meds I can offer no advice.

    About keeping the insulin safe and cool... I've been using Frio wallets for travelling. Mine carries only four pens at a time (~20 days) but I believe they have bigger ones. I've also tried to book hotels with minibars or hostels so that I could keep my spare insulin cold. And I advise apartments/ hostels anyway because you can prepare your own food and control your blood sugar levels better. (At least for me, eating restaurant food several times in row has always been challenging.)

    Frio has only "failed" me once in Madrid (42ºC). But when I noticed the insulin was warming up I asked around for a little bit of ice/ those things that people use to put around bottles and keep them cold (what's its name?) - and everyone was really nice!

    I also used ice packs for travelling from one city/ country to another and I had no problems. But again, since you will be travelling for so long, maybe it's worth checking out mini - fridges that you can connect to a power socket? That will have you covered even for long (night) train rides.

    Enjoy your trip!
     
  15. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I thought I'd revive this thread for the globe trotters amongst us.

    Some great info in it.
     
  16. Jessitalia

    Jessitalia Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi all, I live in Italy and was very surprised to learn that you have to pay for all medicines here until you see a diabetic specialist who then prescribes you with a years worth of stuff (the amount depends on the region). For me this means I pay about £40 a year for additional things I need (basically test strips).

    But it’s much better that paying the €30 for a box of pen tips each time, like I did before I had a health card.

    On other trips I’ve had to beg insulin off my diabetic nurse because my GP said it would mess with their bedget! On holiday in Turkey I bought 5 Lantas pens over the counter in a pharmacy for €30.

    I also use Frio and, while I do use mini bars, I get a little nervous in case they’re too cold!

    Also, I always carry a letter from my old U.K. GP saying that I have to keep my meds with me; I’ve only been asked for it twice in 15 years and that was ages ago.

    I do find packing as a T1 a faff (diabetic life...) but once it’s done, it’s worth it!
     
  17. Broomthebeast

    Broomthebeast Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I use frio wallets they're great!
     
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