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Type 1 - A year after diagnosis (Advice)

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by CallumUK, Jan 15, 2022.

  1. CallumUK

    CallumUK · Newbie

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    Hi, I'm Callum I'm 26 years old and was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes just over a year ago. I want to start by saying, if you've just been diagnosed this is the worst part. It gets easier once you get to grips with it and you can continue to live a completely normal life.

    My first piece of advice is... Get any flash or continuous glucose monitor as soon as possible! The worst part was the fingerpricks. It makes you feel like you have a disease and also hurts! I don't care what anyone says those evil little lancets are painful. You can get a month's worth of sensors for under £100 privately and they'll be at your door in under a week. Do it you won't regret it. It will also help you track your bloods much more easily. I personally use a libre 2 but other options are available.

    Secondly... No-one is perfect. This site is an excellent resource for finding information from other people just like you. It's been immensely helpful; however, you'll always see someone who's only activity in life is keeping their blood sugar between 4-7 judging others. Ignore these people! Your blood sugar will fluctuate until you find your rythm. Even then you'll get highs and lows, it's part of the condition, so don't panic and don't become obsessed with perfect blood sugar if you want any kind of quality of life.

    Thirdly... If someone tells you that you can't eat something, give them the middle finger. You can eat whatever you like as long as you take the insulin for it. Now this isn't license to eat yourself into a coma. Annoyingly you do have to be more careful with your diet, everything in moderation is a good mantra. I'm sure you will have already had a consultation with a nutritionist by now and know the details.

    Fourth and finally... Take some time off. If you've just been diagnosed it's a huge amount to take in, nevermind focusing on work. My employer was an absolute nightmare and expected me back the same day of my diagnosis. I still took a week off to adjust with no repercussions. You're now protected by the equality act (lucky you) Reasonable time off is to be expected.

    There are a million questions you'll have at this stage and the memory of just how depressing and overwhelming this new diagnosis is lives fresh in my memory. If you do have any questions I'll try my absolute best to respond.

    You've got this!
     
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  2. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @CallumUK ,

    Welcome to the forum.

    I was a kid when diagnosed. Right at the start of the summer school break.

    I remember getting my first meter in the 1980s. Far more civilised than previously pee in a testube or on a stick.
    The Libre? It's a game changer. I was self funding for a couple of years?
    I now have them on repeat prescription. Pending on what you do for a living, (where finger prick, bloodletting is inappropriate.) your endo may instruct your GP to put em on repeat? At the time, if was working upto my elbows in chicken muck & carcasses on an egg farm.

    Best wishes with your journey.

    The last 46 years to date have been a blast.. :cool:
     
  3. Sarahlouxoxo

    Sarahlouxoxo · Member

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    I was diagnosed last week at 34 years old and it’s all been a lot to take in, so reading this is a comfort to say the least, I’m getting to terms with the injections etc, I have blurry vision as I had a DKA which is how I was diagnosed. I’m scared to eat any sugar at all at the moment! Living off salads and chicken hopefully in a years time I will have some sort of grasp on it as at the moment it’s just a rollercoaster!
     
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  4. CallumUK

    CallumUK · Newbie

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    Hey Sarah

    I'm glad to hear this was of some comfort. I was the exact same way in terms of initial food fear, when I visit my mum she still panics about everything I eat. Sugar is vital especially if you are taking daily insulin injections, definitely try to get some carbohydrates in your diet as soon as possible otherwise you'll risk having hypos. Anything potato is good. It's slow releasing so you shouldn't get the scary blood sugar spike you might be worrying about.

    Let me know if there's any specific questions you have I know how utterly **** the first few weeks are.
     
  5. Sarahlouxoxo

    Sarahlouxoxo · Member

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    Thank you I appreciate it, just tested positive for Covid so currently trying to get my head around the sick day rules I’m going to need a holiday after all this
     
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  6. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @CallumUK a very positive post. You are lucky to be diagnosed in the era of much better technology. Libre has been a game changer. I too self funded for two years before being eligible. Hopefully due to the new guidelines all type 1s, yourself included will get this on the NHS before the years is out.
    One thing I will say is 8 years into my own journey I now eat very few carbs. I long ago gave up eating rice, pasta, bread, cereal and potatoes on a regular basis. There is absolutely nothing wrong in eating them if you wish to, providing you are confident in injecting accordingly. However, many type 1s have discovered that sugar is not vital (unless having a hypo!) with a good level basal profile you don’t actually have to eat carbs on a regular basis and can manage very well. It is great that we have the choice.
     
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  7. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sarah
    Hope you aren't too poorly. Your blood sugars are usually your body s way of telling you how severely you are reacting to an infection assuming all other things are equal. If you are ill don't be surprised if quite a lot more basal is needed.
    Perhaps you can use the enforced isolation to get used to the diabetes regime.
    Best of luck anyway!
     
  8. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi Callum. A generally useful post but I must disagree with the body needing 'sugar' when on insulin and also you can eat what you want when on insulin. It's important to inject to match the carbs you eat and never to feed the insulin. If you do you may gain weight and end-up with insulin resistance. BTW whilst some people can eat as many carbs as they like and inject to match, I certainly can't as my BS will go sky-high.
     
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