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type 1 diagnosed 2/8/13

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by DanielBail, Aug 4, 2013.

  1. DanielBail

    DanielBail · Active Member

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    Ok guys so i'm pretty new to this and well struggling. fed up of people telling me its really ''manageable'' these days as if that means its Ok that your life's just changed forever.

    My sugar level on diagnosis was in the 40's and but day 3 of Novo and Lantus and i'm down in the lower teens. i am a rather skinny person and so struggle to ''pinch an inch'' and turning into a pin cushion already and have had to stop using my pens on my tummy as it's saw. my second appointment with my doctor since being given all the pens and stuff is Tuesday so i'm sure he'll have some answers but any hints an tips from you guys? would be much appreciated.
     
  2. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    Hi Daniel and welcome to the forum :)

    Here is the information we give to new members which I think you will find helpful. Ask all the questions you need to and someone will be able to answer.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find well over 30,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes ... rains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips
    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  3. BobCornelius

    BobCornelius · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Daniel, Welcome!

    First off, to your 'pinch an inch' situation, what size needles are you using? I use 4mm needles and don't need to pinch skin up!

    :)

    Bob
     
  4. amberzak

    amberzak Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Daniel

    It's natural to feel that way. And, yes it is manageable, but it's not as simple as taking a pill so you have every right to feel frustrated at your diagnoses. The good news, however, is that there is a lot more flexibility with various different treatments. While your life will change, it needn't be turned completely around. When I was diagnoses they put me straight onto multiple injections, meaning I inject when I eat (and at night and the morning). This is good because I can skip meals and I don't have to eat at specific times.

    This is an amazing forum. I've found great advice here and their is a lot of support. I hope you like the forum :)


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  5. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Yes, I'm on 4mm needles and don't need to pinch; I'm thin as well. Do ask for 4mm needles if you aren't already using them. If you Google 'insulin sites' and look at the images link there are stacks of pictures of alternative sites which you may want o discuss with the doc. For 8 years I was on just tablets and had to starve myself to keep my sugars low. I've been on insulin now for 5 months and wouldn't go back as I can eat more freely. I inject twice a day; sometimes three so not full-blown T1. I currently don't have stomach soreness so may be I'm lucky so far. Buttocks and thighs are good alternative sites.
     
  6. hale710

    hale710 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the above, I don't pinch either with my 4mm needle.

    I find my stomach ok but my thighs quite painful at times when I was on a larger needle. It is important to rotate sites though so make sure you talk to the consultant about this.

    I was diagnosed in February. It does get easier, I promise! Everyone does things at their own pace :)
     
  7. DanielBail

    DanielBail · Active Member

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    Thank you to everyone already so helpfull. Im on 5 jabs a day lintus and novo morning night and before every meal routine. Urm the needels for my pens are 5mm is this why I have to pinch? Guys is it true that black tea helps insulin?

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  8. DanielBail

    DanielBail · Active Member

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    Due to my size before being diagnosed I was put on a high carb an sugar diet wich lasted like a week before they checked my bloods. This is because I was desperately trying to gain weight. Am I going to struggle to do this now with a low carb diet? Finding going from eating constantly through the day to 3 times a day verry hard its like trying to kick an addiction

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  9. Gizmo123

    Gizmo123 · Member

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    You'll be fine. You may find you put on some weight now your on insulin as you body won't be using fat/muscle for fuel due to high blood sugar.
    If injecting is really painful you could try putting an ice cube on the chosen injecting spot for a minute to numb the area before injecting. Great in tge house but not do easy outside although a can of juice works. Or you could get a numbing cream from the doctors such as Emla Cream. A shorter needle might be worth trying too.
    I can't imagine what ur going through as I was a child when diagnosed. Your head must be spinning. Take it slow and trust me you will be fine. :)
    Ps Remember to do things like inform DVLA and insurance if u drive.


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  10. DanielBail

    DanielBail · Active Member

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    Thats a eeally good idea hadnt thought of numbing it. Thank you. Yeah its getting a lil easier the more I understand but I dunno this years been like dominoes and now this guesse the only way is up tho

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  11. iHs

    iHs · Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    Although bolus insulin like Novo will work quickly from being injected in the stomach, that's not to say that it can't also be injected at the top side part of the arm or top of the leg. You might find that a bit better.....
     
  12. hale710

    hale710 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was advised by the DSN not to use the top of my arm as I don't have enough fat there. Top of the leg is fine though apparently! Each person will be different with regards to fat, but it seems the OP is on the slim side so it may be advisable to avoid the arm for now.

    Buttocks are a great place to inject. Barely feel a thing! Not really possible out and about though haha
     
  13. DanielBail

    DanielBail · Active Member

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    Ya my arms are pretty much bone lol thys ans bum seem to be working good now tho havnt injected into tummy for about 3days but its still fealing saw. And I dont care how it looks I jabed ma bum in KFC the yesterday haha I tried to be discreat but hey ifnppl dont like it they shudnt be so nosey haha

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  14. hale710

    hale710 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Haha bet you got some looks! Being female I can do my thigh pretty easily in a skirt!
     
  15. DanielBail

    DanielBail · Active Member

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    Ya Im always in shorts really come rain or shine but I had injected each of my thys in the morning and my tummy still saw so the cheek was getting it lol

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  16. Esther1411

    Esther1411 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi Daniel,
    I was diagnosed 3 years ago (i'm 47) and Type 1, I use levimir once a day and novorapid to cover eating anything containing over 20g of carbs - so injecting up to 4 times a day with a 4mm needle into my stomach rotating the site weekly but always in the stomach. I do find that randomly as i stick the needle in sometimes there is a sharp pain and other times I literally dont feel it at all. No idea why this is (anyone...?) However I just say ouch and get on with it... because I didn't realise how GREAT I could feel when my diabetes is in control and how RUBBISH I felt before. You should check with your nurse but i still "graze" through the day if I feel like it, just check out what snacks you can have that are below your recommeded carb intake - for me a small bannana, one digestive biscuit, low carb yoghurt (diet irish yoghurts from tesco are less than 10g) a couple of squares of dark chocolate or even a two fingered kit kat. Thats just me though and as I say you should check with your nurse and google snacks that have less than 20g of carbs to see what you can have. I love food and like the gym (i'm 9st 4lb with a bmi of 22.1) and it took me a few months to get myself together and see that none of that needed to drastically change.
    Something that really helped me was an insulin management course which was half a day once a week for a month. In my area the course was called IMAGE I think there is one called DAFNE too - check it out. And of course this forum is a great place to start there are some really well informed nice peeps on here.
    Hang in there and keep smiling...
    Esther x
     
  17. michelereid2002

    michelereid2002 · Active Member

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    I'm quite chunky person but still pinch I think when I used a small needle I didn't feel I was getting my right dosage of insulin so at the moment I'm using 6mm needles even though my dsn told me I didn't need to pinch but I still prefer to doesn't matter wether ur a newbie or oldie diagnose diabetic it still hard to balance things out
     
  18. faeoj

    faeoj · Well-Known Member

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    when I first started when I was little my mum used to get me to hold an ice cube on the spot I wanted which numbed it then just go for it!


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  19. DanielBail

    DanielBail · Active Member

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    Heelllpppp

    Guys I have had the runs since diagnosis is this due to insulin?

    My doctor said not to worry unless it contains blood but today im on my 8th toilet visit and its consistency is like water.

    I cant take much more of this any sujestions?

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  20. paul-1976

    paul-1976 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Keep an eye on it and don't be fobbed off by the Doc! I'm autoimmune T1 and have Autoimmune Crohns disease and Autoimmune Psoriasis and they can run hand in hand so Crohns disease or coaeliac ARE a real possibility sadly..Make LOADS of noise and don't be fobbed off!
     
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