1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Type 1s: How is everyone keeping bloods under control?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Kerryannhogan, Mar 16, 2016.

Tags:
  1. Kerryannhogan

    Kerryannhogan Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Hi, I'm a type 1 diabetes been diagnosed 2 years ago but think I had way before.

    Anyways, I was wondering what everyones routines are? how are you keeping bloods under control?

    How do people manage to go the day without checking bloods more than 5 times? I'm forever checking mine. I also want to know if people do split injections and how it works for them... sorry if I seem too nosy, I'm just struggling to understand how I keep my bloods within target range, I have a hba1c of 39 but that's due to them always being in 2s from going too low but they always hit the teens after every meal and my doctor said its fine, I'm now on pregablin 600mg a day for neuropathy. Just want to get better and hoping other people can shed some insight!

    Thankyou

    Kerry
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  2. Kristin251

    Kristin251 LADA · Expert

    Messages:
    5,334
    Likes Received:
    3,390
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Low carb is the only thing that works for me. It keeps sugars low but as an added bonusnincna take small doses of insulin and i don't go low.
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. Mep

    Mep Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,461
    Likes Received:
    906
    Trophy Points:
    173
    I test a minimum of 4 times per day and probably up to 12 times on a bad day. I just do what I need to do. I used to do the LCHF at one time in the past but gave that up when I had real high cholesterol readings from that... so for me I'd rather eat more balanced diet of the foods I'm allowed to eat and it seems to work better for me all round (My diet is restricted because of another illness). But the reality of this disease is that food isn't the only thing that affects blood sugar. For me having illnesses that impact on my BGL's has been the hardest thing to manage. Any time my body is fighting something, I find it hard to get good control of my BGL's. I find that out of all the stuff I'm dealing with it is the diabetes that I have some control over at least because insulin helps and so does food if I'm too low. My other stuff I'm dealing with it is hit and miss with drugs, etc. For example if I'm having severe spasms I'm supposed to take strong painkiller with sedative and go and lie down immediately. That doesn't work when I'm at work or I can't swallow because of the spasm. At least with my BGL's if it is high I can use insulin, or treat a low and I find it usually comes right eventually. Oops sorry I'm probably ranting a bit... just giving you my perspective what I think about controlling my BGL's. Also when I see my endocrinologist these days he wants to discuss my overall health and he said I'm doing well considering what I'm having to deal with. My last hbA1c was 7% which was my highest in a while, I got a bit upset about that. But my endo said well you've had a nasty time in the past year so 7% is actually very good for you (I had been hospitalised a few times, on antibiotics for about 34 weeks)
     
    • Like Like x 4
  4. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · BANNED

    Messages:
    2,374
    Likes Received:
    2,108
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution, 4th edition by Richard Bernstein, MD changed my life. It's a good book. He's a type 1 diabetic, diagnosed at age 12, now his early 80's. He's enjoying vibrant good health, no diabetic complications. His book led me to the low carbohydrate diet. It changed changed everything for me. Learn more by doing a search on his name on YouTube. Last A1c was 5.4%. I crossed over into type 2 diabetes about 10 years ago. I don't take any medication. :)
     
    • Like Like x 11
  5. steve_p6

    steve_p6 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    414
    Likes Received:
    290
    Trophy Points:
    123
    @Kerryannhogan Also look at Gary Scheiner - Think Like A Pancreas.

    For tight control many find they need to test 10 times/day or use a Freestyle Libre to get full 24 hr views.

    For those on Levemir, depending on dose, we can split into two 12 hr doses. If you are on something else just ask and someone will know.

    For you post meal spikes you have two tactics to apply. (1) take the Rapid before you eat - start at 10 mins and increase the gap until you see an effect (2) reduce carbs, ie more carbs=bigger spikes.

    Try Carbs and Cals App if you need help with Carb Counting.
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,390
    Likes Received:
    2,892
    Trophy Points:
    198
    hi @Kerryannhogan , I test at least 7 times a day & I have a continuous glucose monitor.

    I split my levemir 50/50. I also sometimes split my bolus if I'm eating something v fatty, so I'll take half before & half after or half in my tummy & half in my bum - I think the pumps have special bolus waves to help with this.

    I have found injecting 20-40 mins (depending on the meal) before I eat to really help with the spikes - I found this by taking the approach @steve_p6 suggests, see how you go with 10 minutes before & work backwards.

    Do you carb count? Have you done DAFNE or similar?

    Is your dr who says "it's fine" an endocrinologist or a GP? My HbA1C is 43 and while that sounds fine on paper it is really only that low because I'm hypo twice a day and to be honest I see my low HbA1C as a sign of my poor control (I'm not saying that is the case for everyone, I'm sure it is possible to get a low HbA1C with good control) and I would expect any endo wth a patient with 39 reporting a lot of time in the 2s to actually be quite concerned and to be talking about higher target levels.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

    Messages:
    12,432
    Likes Received:
    15,546
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Before, I got a real sense of how and what different foods did to me, I tested up to ten times a day.
    Since then and a small restriction on my strips, I check only about 2-3 times a day, unless I think I need to.
    Control is critical to my condition. I have to keep control unless I want to be ill!
    It's all about food and wHat is bad for you.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,599
    Likes Received:
    2,189
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Dexcom G5, Accu-Chek Aviva Expert and test up to 10x a day, Levemir split basal injections, Novolog(Novorapid) Echo pen so I can inject in .5unit increments.

    However, for me it's more about my routine and being consistent with it rather than my diabetes equipment.

    -I wake up at 4am nearly every day. That helps me catch any dawn phenomenon or blood sugar rises very early.

    -I am very active and my exercise is primarily based around powerlifting and bodybuilding. For general health I jog about 15-20miles a week. Having a lot of extra muscle mass helps create a "buffer" as I can store quite a bit of glycogen which is extremely effective at keeping my levels in range.

    -Perhaps the most effective aspect of my routine is my low carb/high protein diet. It's a bit unconventional as I eat 250-300g of protein a day (equates to about 3g of protein for 1kg of body weight). That much protein can absolutely cause hyperglycemia but for me the rises are very gradual and easier to control. The excess protein also seems to be extremely effective at avoiding hypos. If I ever need to lose a few extra pounds I simply reduce my total protein intake and keep everything else the same.

    As far as timing my injections, I generally inject just as I begin to eat. My pancreas still produces some insulin and my initial natural insulin response is fairly good, but becomes extremely poor after about 30-60 minutes. Consequently, I tend to inject 2-4 times throughout a meal rather than all at once before.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  9. Kerryannhogan

    Kerryannhogan Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Thankyou all for your replies, I can see that everyone has different ways to help them so I was intrigued to know what everyone else does that's so different to me, hopefully I can take away some of the stuff you have advised me with and regain some control to my bloods. I will definitely read the books!

    I have done the ice course but I found I didn't really get much from that, the glycaemic foods was confusing, I'm officially getting a pump today so hopefully this might help more! I do test 20 times a day not even joking, but that's cause I have no hypo warning and I'm always hypoing!

    Another question I would like to ask, if someone has a blood count pre meal of 4.5 and eats something to keep the bloods under 7 but some of the food may cause a rise even if its included with the healthy meal, would they inject 15 mins before and then 2 hours after? also if this was me wanting to keep them under 7 id be constantly hypoing I drink a bottle of Lucozade each day and I don't feel healthy for it! :( but whenever I try to keep my bloods under 7, they rise and then dip low very quickly, I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Hug Hug x 1
  10. Garr

    Garr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    360
    Likes Received:
    425
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Think Like A Pancreas by Gary Scheiner, exercise, keeping a daily record, leaving 4 hrs between meals, leaving at least 4 hrs between last bolus and bed, timing the bolus to try and match the spike, no snacking. I used to test around 8 times a day but a lot less now I have the Freestyle Libre. On Lantus and Novorapid, inject Lantus once a day. Getting your basal rate right, is, I think, the most important part. Having the Novopen echo that gives half units also helped to get better control.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  11. Garr

    Garr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    360
    Likes Received:
    425
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Hi @Kerryannhogan , if I was 4.5 pre-meal ( and not planning any exercise) I'd take a half unit less than the total carbs and inject just before eating. It might take me a bit over 7 when it's at it's peak, but once the insulin and food had finished what they're doing, I would expect to be around 6. I'm on 1 unit for 10g, I'd only split the dose if it was high in fat. I wouldn't think it's possible to keep your blood sugars below 7 all the time. Hope that makes sense.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,780
    Likes Received:
    7,400
    Trophy Points:
    178
    It could be that you need to alter the timing of your bolus injection. It sounds like maybe the insulin isn't working in time to deal with the food, so you go high but then drop down low later as the insulin kicks in. This can happen to me at breakfast if I don't time my bolus right.

    If you get the timing of your injection spot on, you may then be able to reduce the amount of insulin slightly as it'll be able to match your food better. Again, this will help with lows.

    I have a pump and I normally test 7-12 times a day. I always test two hours after meals. I aim to be below 8 two hours after eating generally.
     
  13. pms-pms

    pms-pms Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Is any one nil my mouth? Fed via peg through the stomach, has insulin twice a day, test three times a day. Just want to know what blood sugars are.
     
  14. teacher123

    teacher123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    469
    Trophy Points:
    133
    What is your daily carb intake then?

    I would run 22-30 miles a week and definitely staying active and reduced carbs has enabled my honeymoon to continue...
     
  15. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,214
    Likes Received:
    12,468
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Not yet.. But can see it coming in the future as stomach is just not working..
    Bloods vary according to bowel emptying (or not)....
     
  16. mentat

    mentat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    185
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I would find another doctor!! Your diabetes is totally out of control, you're developing complications after only 2 years, it is definitely not fine.

    No, the ONLY reason I would do that is if I often hypo within the first hour after eating.
    If my sugar is 4.5 before eating I will simply take a bit less insulin compared to a sugar of 6. If you frequently split your dose like this it may be contributing to your big spikes, because it means there is less insulin in your body at the point where the meal is digesting fastest.

    In your situation I would start by backing off on the insulin until the hypos are eliminated, because all the hypo food/lucozade you consume complicates things, and actually the hormones a hypo creates can destabilise things for hours after. (Avoiding hypos for a while also improves hypo awareness.)

    If you are testing so often it can be hard to know how to adjust your dosages. Because fast-acting insulin lasts roughly 4 hours in your body, the usual approach is to see where your sugars are at around 4 hours after a meal (this is assuming you didn't take extra food or hypo treatment or insulin in between; if you did that must be taken into account).

    If I had massive spikes and constant lows I would be suspecting my basal (long acting) is too high during the day. The pump will give you full control of your basal levels at different times of day so this could be a big help. (Be aware that changing your basals will make you need different amounts of fast-acting, though.)

    I need 12 units of basal at night but practically zero during the day until about 7pm, my endo is baffled! This only started 8 months ago; before that my basal needs were more consistent.

    Good luck, feel free to PM me if you have any questions.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  17. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,599
    Likes Received:
    2,189
    Trophy Points:
    178
    On most days, it's less than 50g.

    There are days I eat more (and some days I eat A LOT more), but I'm usually good about running/exercising extra to cover those additional carbs/calories.
     
  18. teacher123

    teacher123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    469
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Yes more or less the same for me. I don't have breakfast and usually a salad with some form of fish for lunch, then for dinner it's usually greens and chicken/pork/fish. I tend to find Sunday the hardest day because I take a break from all sport and easy to go overboard with carbs. I usually increase protein on Sundays to provide greater satiety and repair from Saturday long runs.
     
  19. Diamattic

    Diamattic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    678
    Likes Received:
    1,038
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hey Kerry!

    I am just about 2 years now myself - I can say that the biggest thing i employ to keep things in check is eating low carb, and exercise.

    Whenever I am going to eat a meal I think about what i WANT to eat and then think "How can I remove as much carbs as possible?" Often times it's eating a salad instead of fries, or instead of having a sandwich I do a lettuce wrap or just eat everything off of a plate so as to avoid the bread lol

    The next big thing is to get to the gym as much as I can to keep in shape, and keep the metabolism up. Exercise tends to raise insulin sensitivity so it ensure my insulin doses stay as effective as possible.

    I also like to check my sugars 2 hours after each meal, and if they are higher then 10mmol/L i get up and go for a brisk walk for rough 10-15min, which always helps to bring them down much faster then insulin ever could. I walk pretty much whenever my sugars are high instead of insulin because I find a 2-4km walk will take me down much faster. Rain or shine, night or day, I get up and out and walk my route (I really should get a dog - It would make it seem less creepy I am sure but oh well lol)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  20. Kerryannhogan

    Kerryannhogan Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    48

    Hi! I absolutely love your way haha! I hate salads but I'm sure ill come round to them lol! ive just started out on a pump now so my whole routine has cocked up !

    I'm definitely going to try your way, sounds easier than done though!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook