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Type 2 Diabetes and Gum disease

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by ShugaShuga, Oct 20, 2015.

  1. ShugaShuga

    ShugaShuga Type 2 · Member

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    Hi.
    I am having problems with my painful, tender gums, which affect my sleep. My dentist is one of those, "No Pain, No Gain" types who basically says that I should floss regularly and scrub my teeth/gums hard with a toothbrush and it will go away. I have tried and it hasn't. I have tried Corsadyl and that burnt my gums and made things even more sore. To make matters worse two molars embedded in the gums have started aching. Whether the ache is the teeth or the gums, or both, is hard to tell. Any ideas on dealing with gum disease and time lapse before effects are noticed, would be appreciated. The gums are not bleeding at this stage.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. MargaretR

    MargaretR Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I use interdental brushes. They are little brushes about 1cm long, and fine, and with a slightly longer handle. Mine are a swedish make and about 8 different widths are available, all with different colour handles.. I know Sainsbury and Boots stock them, but often their own make, and not as many widths. I need 3 different widths to cover my whole mouth as you need a close fit, but not tight (that hurts!). My dentist started me using them and my gums have improved amazingly.

    I never got on with flossing or hard brushing, but these don't hurt, and are more effective than flossing.

    Margaret
     
  3. Another vote for interdental brushes. Plus good bg control and quarterly trips to the hygienist for a scraping (got mine tomorrow :wideyed:)
     
  4. Annieok

    Annieok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I use the interdental brushes but dip them in Corsadyl and it has really sorted out my bleeding and sensitive gums. I also have a deep clean every quarter to keep any problems under control.
     
  5. ShugaShuga

    ShugaShuga Type 2 · Member

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    Sorry. What's bg?
     
  6. mrspuddleduck

    mrspuddleduck · Guest

    Firstly, stop brushing hard!!! It is the worst thing you can do. Hard brushing damages even the most healthy gums, can cause tiny abrasions that can introduce infection and/or cause inflammation of the gums!! BTW I am not a dentist but have had years of treatment due to secondary dental/gum problems. Whilst your gums are sore, I would use a child's toothbrush, gently and slowly brushing morning, evening and after every meal. Use Sensodine or similar, and invest in some interdental brushes. Dump the dental floss!! Then, and most important - find a new dentist!!!!!!! Sue xxxx
     
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  7. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I would change dentists, because scrubbing your teeth/gums hard is the worst thing you can do... gentle brushing is the way to go. I have 6 monthly hygienist visits. Hopefully a new dentist can advise you about those molars too.
     
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  8. raymort

    raymort Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi,
    My dentist has informed me that there is a correlation of bad gums/teeth when a diabetic. I was told that I have to be seen every 6 months. I was prescribed a toothpaste with flora in it, and works very well. I could not tolerate metformin and today I have been prescribed forxiga or dapaglifozin. I am hoping to see a better readings as I am in the teens eg 10mmol to 18mmol. watch this space I will inform all my results. Regards Raymort
     
  9. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Check out 'oil pulling' with coconut oil too. Mrs Google will help.
     
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  10. ShugaShuga

    ShugaShuga Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks for that. I got some interdental brushes and will give them a go. Unfortunately, some of my teeth are so close together (a dentist said something about "rotated"?), that only floss will go between them. Even then, some flosses, (eg Cordasyl), are still too thick. I have used the floss "harps", but they can be difficult to manipulate in the dark rear recesses of my mouth.
     
  11. ShugaShuga

    ShugaShuga Type 2 · Member

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    I might give this a go, I'm still a bit wary of Cordasyl, especially after fully reading the instructions under the main label. You know, where you suddenly notice there's a little label in a corner that says "Unpeel here" and you find the instructions that they don't want you to find until you've bought it. The ones that talk about the skin peeling off your cheeks. That's what happened to me. They do suggest diluting it, so I might try that.
     
  12. ShugaShuga

    ShugaShuga Type 2 · Member

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    Except that I'll have to dip floss in the Cordasyl, because the interdents won't fit in the worst affected places. Not even the pink size 0 (0.4mm). Maybe that's why they're worst affected?
     
  13. ShugaShuga

    ShugaShuga Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks for that. I think that maybe I should look around.
     
  14. Neverbloobloo

    Neverbloobloo · Member

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    Using interdental brushes is a great way to keep the gums free from the food debris that causes problems. As the others have said, hard brushing is very bad for your teeth as it will erode the enamel, as I found out to my cost. However I now use an electric toothbrush with a sensor light that flashes when you are pressing too hard. I spend a little individual time on each tooth surface and my gums with the whole process taking between 2-3 minutes morning and night. Once a week I give them a more thorough clean. Since I started this regime a couple of years ago I have had no problems and see my dentist & hygienist (Who are aware of my diabetes) twice a year, both say I'm doing well. Get yourself to a good dental practice!
     
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  15. ShugaShuga

    ShugaShuga Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks. What I don't know is what to do if you've actually got gum problems. How do I cure it? How long does it take? Is it a bit of a long haul?
     
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  16. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    I went through a phase of sensitive gums, near the back - turned out I was brushing too hard, and irritating that area. It was the way I was holding the toothbrush. Changed my grip, changed to a sonic toothbrush, didn't press so hard, and problem disappeared.

    Do you have a sonic toothbrush? Cos you shouldn't really brush at all with one of those. You just hold the brush gently touching the tooth, or the crevice between the teeth, and the sonic waves agitate the saliva, the toothpaste and the plaque, and the teeth are cleaned by the waves.

    My teeth are far cleaner now than when I used to scrub them!

    You can get a battery operated sonic toothbrush for about £10 in supermarkets nowadays, so it is within everyone's budget.
     
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  17. ShugaShuga

    ShugaShuga Type 2 · Member

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    The hygenist told me that my manual brushing was pretty good, so I was a bit surprised when the dentist told me to "scrub 'em". Although the hygenist said to continue with manual, the idea of a toothbrush that warns of brushing too hard is interesting. What make is it?
     
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  18. ShugaShuga

    ShugaShuga Type 2 · Member

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    I used to have one, but it was rechargeable. I got a bit fed up with charging it or having it cut out half way through a cycle. It ended up in a drawer. A battery operated one could be worth re-visiting. My problem teeth/gums are also at the back, so hmmm..
     
  19. Neverbloobloo

    Neverbloobloo · Member

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    I use an Oral B, got it from Boots the chemist, it has two types of cleaning action and gives an indication at 30, 60, 90 and 120 seconds. I think it was about £35 a couple of years ago and still going strong, I only charge it about once a week. Hope that helps.
     
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