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Type 2 hypos - no meds

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by lucylocket61, Sep 27, 2019.

  1. First.Officer

    First.Officer Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I suspect that some people naturally have physiology that operates on a daily basis above the definitions that define being (more specifically T2) Diabetic. A little like with higher BP.
     
  2. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I would like to remind everyone that Hypoglycaemia can also be a condition alongside T2! Also symptoms and episodes of hypoglycaemia will happen from time to time because of other illnesses.
    Blood sugar levels are never constant because of hormone response to life cycles.
    Hypoglycaemia on a regular basis should be looked at by a specialist or a GP at the very least. Having low blood sugar levels is dangerous and will cause health problems.
     
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  3. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    but some on here say they are regularly 4 or under. Isnt this good?
     
  4. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    I think the hypo numerical threshold varies with people, and should not be a fixed number for all Type 2's. The number 4 is perhaps what was said for type 1's so they have time to act if they are continuing to go down? Maybe?

    We are all different.
     
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  5. Member496333

    Member496333 · Guest

    Pretty much exactly the point I was making :)
     
  6. New Haven Neil

    New Haven Neil Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was reading this thread with interest a couple of days ago. Left it at that, read other threads, as you do.

    This lunchtime, after having the same breakfast I always do, felt a little....shaky....so did a test - 3.8. Why? Not ill, T2 with no meds managing well (A1C 41/5.9 last time, expecting lower next month) just a normal day, had a walk but not excessively active, and a near hypo. Odd. So it does happen, apparently for no particular reason.
     
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  7. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Go watch Fantasia again.
    You know you want to, :)
     
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  8. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am considering seeing an Endo - I think some of my problems revolve around glucagon production.

    However given that my last HbA1c was 6.6% I am classed as well controlled so my only option would be a private referral. Chatted with my diabetes specialist GP and they were very up front. Many people in much deeper trouble than I am so no case for NHS funding. More than happy to write a referral letter for a private consultation.

    Now find your Endo!

    Just waiting for the fourth 500 mg Metformin to settle in and another Libre fortnight then I really should get my finger out.
     
  9. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    A diabetes consultant I know regularly runs at 3.5 mmol/L.
    However with a fully functioning endocrine system (I devoutly hope) they can kick some serious liver dump if the BG level drops below that.

    Those of us with a wonky control system are probably more at risk if going below 4.
    So I think that 3.5 is fine as long as your liver can spring to your defence.
     
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  10. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    At what level, that is too low for anyone, is of course Individual, but for those who suffer from hypos that are not T1s, I have been told and read many times that if anyone is under 3.5mmols should avoid going lower.
    My own feelings are that I start feeling the hypo around 3.8, , my eyes go blurred, the headache behind my eyes start, I feel awful and I start getting the sensation of lightheaded, drowsy and lethargy.
    Being just under four is fine, unless of course the symptoms are dangerous for you.
     
  11. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  12. New Haven Neil

    New Haven Neil Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It happened again. Usual breakfast, exactly as I have every day other than a glass of V8 juice, which is vegetable not fruit and almost carb free. By 11.45 felt shaky, did a test, 3.6! Surely the V8 juice wasn't to blame, I wasn't active at all, it just....happens occasionally. One chocolate finger and a slice of Burgen bread and I was fine. 5.6 next test.
     
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  13. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    It really doesn't matter what takes you into a hypoglycaemic episode, wether, protein, carbs, fats, vegetables or fruit, if it does, then the obvious choice is not to have that breakfast!
    Did you check after the hypo treatment? To see if you had the rebound effect?

    However, after a little thinking time, it could be you were having a bad day, something other than the breakfast could be influencing blood sugar levels, hormones, cold, flu jab, anything that could drop your blood glucose levels. If you keep getting the episodes, you will have to talk to your doctor, medical team.
    Best wishes
     
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  14. New Haven Neil

    New Haven Neil Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Two out of three there as it happens, you're spot on - a mild cold and had the flu jab the day before. Wasn't aware they'd reduce BG?

    I did say my BG went to 5.6 after addressing it.
     
  15. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    It can effect it either way in my experience, usually in T2s, the levels rise and causes the slight hyper /spike symptoms, but because sometimes the hormonal response to food and whatever ails you, can result in a drop.

    The 5.6 is really good, what I alluded to was after that reading, because of my experience of hypos and the after effects, if you treat a hypo with too much glucose/ carbs, your glucose levels will rise and trigger an insulin response that might drop you again, known as a rebound effect.

    T2s can and do get symptoms of hypoglycaemia, such as those with actual hypoglycaemic conditions.
    In the end it is still about finding out about the food that you can get good control of your blood sugar levels.

    Best wishes
     
  16. New Haven Neil

    New Haven Neil Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ah OK. I was 6.5 at the next check (worried so did an extra), 4.8 next before dinner, then, errrrr had a home made curry with half jasmine ice half cauliflower rice (all had before with no issues) and spiked to 10.2! Settled back to 5.6 by morning. Confusing condition, diabetes!
     
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  17. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    For most type2 rice would spike their BG
     
  18. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Yeah, I would forego the starchy carby varieties of food entirely.
    For me, the likes of rice, potatoes and the like are really bad for my blood sugar levels, no matter how small the portion size!
    It's the advice from certain quarters, that have confused the best way to control T2!

    Hence this website and forum!
     
  19. New Haven Neil

    New Haven Neil Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but as I said, I previously had the exact same meal without a particularly large spike, in the region of 7 or 8 - an increase I considered acceptable anyway for an occasional treat. It was a miserable small portion of the mixed rices. I don't often have it.

    White bread and pizza bread are the worst things for me, quickly followed by white pasta, all things I have cut out completely. That red lentil pasta is OK though.

    Went to DESMOND today, what a waste of time....
     
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