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Type 2 possible5

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by ElizaRoo, May 16, 2022.

  1. ElizaRoo

    ElizaRoo · Newbie

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    I hate going to the GP, even telephone appointments!

    I had gestestional diabetes, although diagnosed very late- from 30 weeks pregnant I mentioned to my midwife how constantly thirsty I was but because I'm normal weight she told me it was just my body telling me to drink more for my growing baby. I was quick annoyed, I ended up with a huge baby and we were both quite poorly at 39 weeks.

    4 years later I've started to notice the last few months being really thirsty again, tingling in my hands and feet, an infection in my foot I can't clear up and constant thrush that I've had for months now. I know it sounds silly but I feel like it's in my head to suggest it's diabetes ie the midwife saying I'm too slim (I'm 38). It's not a thirst of taking jugs of water to bed but weeing more but then I'm drinking more...but then I think could it just be anxiety. The midwife has really made me doubt myself. I also have epilepsy.

    How severe was your thirst? Sorry for the ramble.
     
  2. ElizaRoo

    ElizaRoo · Newbie

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    ps I developed a liking to orange juice in my last pregnancy which the doctor thought triggered the diabetes off. Only thing that helped with feeling sick.
     
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  3. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Please make an appointment for a blood test, no matter how much you hate GP appointments.
    Diabetes is managable, but you do need to know!
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
  4. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @ElizaRoo and welcome to the forums.

    Thirst is one symptom diabetes, as is thrush and a persistent foot injury. Of course, these symptoms could also be unrelated, so the best thing to do is go to your GP and get a blood test.

    Generally T2s , if that is what you are, have issues with more carbohydrate than their bodies can deal with, so orange juice may not help. But T2s can be thin, so size doesn't prove anything.

    I urge you to get the tests. so you know one way or the other. If you do have T2, then there is plenty you can do to manage it. Many of the folk here keep their levels normal just be cutting back on the amount of carbohydrate they eat.

    Good luck.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  5. Lobsang Tsultim

    Lobsang Tsultim Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thirst for me wasn't very noticeable - I have an enlarged prostate which causes me to get up through the night to urinate anyway, so I'd become used to restricting how much fluid I drank and disregarding any thirst. The most noticeable symptom for me was the fatigue, no matter how much rest I got or whether I'd eaten, and rapid weight gain without a diet change (I went from 88kg to 120kg in 2 years).

    Interestingly, I asked for a blood test to check for diabetes last June, but the HbA1c result was 41. This April, before a scheduled operation for the prostate, it had gone up to 74. So I noticed symptoms long before the results showed in my blood results.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    #5 Lobsang Tsultim, May 17, 2022 at 11:09 AM
    Last edited: May 17, 2022
  6. finzi1966

    finzi1966 · Well-Known Member

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    Back when I was first DX Type 2 thirst was definitely a major symptom for me - I was thirsty ALL the time. My HbA1C wasn’t super super high (I think it was 52 at diagnosis) but obviously high enough to cause thirst symptoms.

    Also, feeling tired, groggy and out of sorts. That’s definitely only something I noticed in retrospect once the sugars had gone down.
     
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  7. MaviesDavies2

    MaviesDavies2 · Member

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    The chances of getting type 2 increase substantially once you have had gestational diabetes; I sadly only found this out once I had my T2 diagnosis.

    Go and ask for a blood test; it will either confirm your suspicions or put your anxiety to rest.

    Best of luck.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
  8. Mrs HJG

    Mrs HJG LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I was drinking loads and equally passing loads, I thought it was the drinking causing the peeing, as when I was out I could and would restrict my drinking, (although still thirsty), to avoid having to go to the loo all the time.

    My doctor did not suspect diabetes as it was 'manageable' - turns out I am T1/LADA at 51, and had a mega HbA1c!

    So please get an appointment, there is no rule for 'how much in or out = diabetic', and I'd say all your symptoms are classic and your midwife was completely uneducated, and dangerous in her opinions.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
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