1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2022 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Type 2's: What was your fasting blood glucose in a morning?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by simply_h, Aug 23, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Type2Guy

    Type2Guy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    860
    Trophy Points:
    123
    This morning was a move in the right direction with a fasting blood glucose of 6.7 (120). I avoided eating any grains yesterday, which seems to make a noticeable difference in my blood glucose lottery playing strategy. I also went for a walk along Lake Michigan before bed, which included a minute long sprint to inform a cop stationed at the entrance of the park of a youth gang disagreement that seemed primed to make Chicago even more infamous for its murder rate. I feel as if I should have scored an even better fasting blood glucose number from the benefit of last night's impromptu late night exercise, but I'm now convinced that my anxiety is so threatened by the possibility of my ability to cope better, even without junk food to keep it at bay, that it is doing whatever it can to trigger reasons for me to be perpetually unnerved in my quest for diabetes control by way of rigging the numbers to rise. I expect things will eventually settle down after the lobotomy.
     
    • Like Like x 18
    #26081 Type2Guy, Jul 23, 2015 at 2:35 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 23, 2015
  2. oldman1954

    oldman1954 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    532
    Likes Received:
    4,667
    Trophy Points:
    158
    While i have you lovely people on this forum for support i can get through any thing
     
    • Like Like x 12
  3. Alzebra

    Alzebra Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    6,120
    Trophy Points:
    158
    • Like Like x 12
  4. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    10,115
    Likes Received:
    16,095
    Trophy Points:
    278
    Alison, I'd like to comment on something you said in your post, and something I've read before. Specifically, you talked about your liver punishing you when you have a liver dump?

    Whilst I know liver dumps are very frustrating, all you are doing is cycling your body's stores of glucose, to raise your levels a little, to help you cope with e exertions of waking, getting up etc., or to keep you going if you're running short of fuel.

    Our body store glucose, as a natural function of metabolism. When a liver dump happens, it releases some of that store into our bloodstreams, which raises the numbers. When we next come to eat, the first thing our bodies do is to replenish the store it has released, so that it refills that coping mechanism for the future.

    Have you noticed that when people talk about the Dawn Phenomenon, they then often comment they don't see much of a rise after breakfast? Well, that's because some of the energy they have just consumed has gone into their liver, for another time, rather than remain circulating in their bloodstream. In the longer run, it all evens itself out; after all we've only consumed what we've consumed.

    Whilst i appreciate the bigger numbers can be alarming, or at best annoying, but personally, I view the odd liver dump as a good thing, as I see it in my (albeit very odd) mind as healthily turning over the supplies - a bit like I try to cycle my the supplies I keep in my larder, using oldest first.

    Obviously that's ultra, ultra simplistic, but I find if I can distil complex concepts into simple language I get the hang of things more quickly.
     
    • Like Like x 11
  5. MosheBenYehuda

    MosheBenYehuda Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    353
    Likes Received:
    3,546
    Trophy Points:
    158
    That was very instructing, much appreciated :)
     
    • Like Like x 9
  6. Clivethedrive

    Clivethedrive Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,995
    Likes Received:
    18,408
    Trophy Points:
    198
    3.5 Am fasting, 4.7 pre dinner, 5.9 post dinner
     
    • Like Like x 30
  7. Baruney

    Baruney Type 2 · BANNED

    Messages:
    928
    Likes Received:
    6,074
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hola Southbeds

    Welcome to the forum - we haven't been introduced because I'm on parole - better be quick as I can hear the headmaster lurking round the corner.

    Are you sure you need psyllium husk after that lot!

    Shhhhhh. keep that just between me and you for now.

    Laters.
     
    • Like Like x 16
  8. Alisonjane10

    Alisonjane10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,671
    Likes Received:
    12,445
    Trophy Points:
    178

    Hi @AndBreathe. What I meant when using the word "punish" is that my body doesn't like it when I go too long in between meals. I have never been a snacker, & I've struggled to get used to having to do so as another consequence of having Diabetes. As a busy nurse, I don't get meals at a regular time when at work. There's often whole shifts when I just don't have time to take a break. What are you supposed to do when a patient needs you...take your break or help the person in your care. No contest! I will choose caring for my patient every time. Unfortunately, It's led to a lifetime of poor eating habits, often with the main meal coming at the end of a shift having gone all day on just water & maybe a slice of toast. I now carry a small packet of mixed fruit/nuts in my tunic pocket so I can eat on the run. So, when my liver "punishes" me by dumping, I completely understand why....but, it's not always something I can do much about. Especially at work.
     
    • Like Like x 12
    #26088 Alisonjane10, Jul 23, 2015 at 6:40 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 25, 2015
  9. Gezzabelle

    Gezzabelle Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,280
    Likes Received:
    5,996
    Trophy Points:
    198
     

    Attached Files:

    • $_35.JPG
      $_35.JPG
      File size:
      16.7 KB
      Views:
      113
    • Like Like x 9
  10. emptyplate

    emptyplate Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    3,808
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Yes still here but, sometimes (only sometimes) I get to wondering if that is a good thing or not. That sounds doom and gloom but, unfortunately, that's the reality for some people (probably more than we know) me included. I'm not mentioning it as a woe is me or having a pity party - just highlighting my struggles and how they impact my blood glucose management.

    Thank you for your kind thoughts and the same is wished for you from me.
     
    • Like Like x 15
  11. emptyplate

    emptyplate Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    3,808
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Yes it is easy to say and when you're down and almost out and weary of it all it's hard to take it in the spirit it is given. That's not to say I don't appreciate that well meaning spirit because I do.

    There are no corners for me to turn - it is a valley with varying depths.

    Thanks for the virtual hug though.
     
    • Like Like x 12
  12. emptyplate

    emptyplate Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    3,808
    Trophy Points:
    158
    I've never fully understood that saying.

    Does it mean that when it gets tough the tough "do one!" like, run away?

    Or, does it mean the tough use tough times to motivate them?

    It's just a bit unclear to me - although, I suspect it's the latter of the two scenarios I've mentioned above.
     
    • Like Like x 9
  13. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    10,115
    Likes Received:
    16,095
    Trophy Points:
    278
    Top right of the screen. Click on the envelope
     
    • Like Like x 4
  14. MosheBenYehuda

    MosheBenYehuda Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    353
    Likes Received:
    3,546
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Sorry to pop in, but no envelope on my screen:-(
     
    • Like Like x 3
  15. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,852
    Likes Received:
    13,932
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Agreed.

    The one I really dislike is:
    "If it doesn't kill you, it makes you stronger".....
    just does my nuts that one
    Hj
     
    • Like Like x 11
  16. 4ratbags

    4ratbags Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,334
    Likes Received:
    9,555
    Trophy Points:
    178
    5.8. Good considering I had a bun with dinner and chocolate before bed and I didnt manage to get any sleep last night
     
    • Like Like x 27
  17. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,852
    Likes Received:
    13,932
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I think you might be safe for a couple of hours as the Head is probably on a pillow somewhere in the night... just be ready for the morn!
     
    • Like Like x 10
  18. JoyceGlasgow

    JoyceGlasgow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    161
    Likes Received:
    2,038
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hi Alisonjane10 I find it easier to pm from the full diabetes website where the envelope is next to the flag. Hope that this helps. Joyce
     
    • Like Like x 10
  19. Pasha

    Pasha Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    8,533
    Likes Received:
    21,222
    Trophy Points:
    198
    68 mg/dl 0r 3.77 mmoles/l
     
    • Like Like x 26
  20. Pasha

    Pasha Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    8,533
    Likes Received:
    21,222
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Its a saying from the USA marines. It means that when things get tough [ ie as in a battle or struggle] then the determined and strong willed [ tough, resilient characters] get going ie apply themselves to the challenge , generally meant to be the fight for life.
    Hope this is clear ?
    I personally think its a great saying, simple and honest.
     
    • Like Like x 14
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook