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Urgent advice - grafting with T2

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by PickledPepper, Aug 11, 2010.

  1. PickledPepper

    PickledPepper · Well-Known Member

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    Having been a pen pusher for a while now (and being pretty sure the stress from the toxic environment helped bring on T2!), I'm going back to the manual type work I did as a teenager in the next few days (construction) to give that another go.

    I just wondered if anyone here 'grafts' with T2 and if there is anything I need to be careful of?

    I will take plenty of water and eat a breakfast like 10% fat Greek Yogurt (seems to keep me going longer than anything else).

    Maybe I'll slip a few sweets in my pocket in case I feel hypo?

    I know I can't lift half as much as I used to prediagnosis, but hopefully a few days of this will help me get back to my old strength.

    Any experienced folks advice is appreciated.
     
  2. naillig

    naillig Type 1 · Member

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    When I am gardening, I always have my test meter, and a bottle of glucose drink handy. Its surprising how quickly my blood sugar drops. So be careful, and good luck with your new job.
    Gill
     
  3. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    I go to the gym regularly and walk a LOT. I don't have any problems[minimal medication], but I do carry a pack of glucotabs. I've just had to replace my stock as my granddaughter got into my handbag and filched my last lot, causing her parents to ring me in the evening to ask what pills she'd got hold of, when she took one out of her pocket and put it into her mouth.
    Of course pills are kept SAFE.
    Hana
     
  4. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    Glucotabs or Dextrose are easy to carry, come in different flavours as well. Take plenty of water and perhaps a snack and you should be fine.

    You are diet only so unlikely to go too low before you ' liver dump' to bring your levels up again.
     
  5. bowell

    bowell · Well-Known Member

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    Well from an ex Plumber for over 30years

    Don't miss your breakfast
    Fill your bait bag up so you can eat something at all brake times
    keep emergence bottle of coke and few sweets in your bag
    Something just in case you have to work unexpected overtime
    and your test kit

    STOP FOR ALL your normal building site bait/tea times ie 10:00 12:00 15:00
    I found the 10:00 tea brake was the most important one for me. Every time I missed this
    I was very low soon after that and had a odd hypo :oops:

    keep in mind how hard your working at the time :idea:

    If you do take medication that will drop your glucose level example Glicazide
    Tell someone all you need is the coke in your bait bag ASAP :shock:
    Be careful as building sites are dangerous places watch your feet and keep your boots on
    I had some good work mates over the years , and miss all the banter

    So good luck with the new job and drink loads of tea for me :D
     
  6. PickledPepper

    PickledPepper · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks a lot guys! :D

    I have to admit I am cra**ing myself a bit due to my diminished strength....the work is heavy....but s*d it, if I don't try I'll never know huh?

    If by remote chance, I do keel over, I'd like to say you guys here have so great since I was hit by that bolt from the blue - diabetes.

    I think my biggest threat is going hypo. I need to keep checking myself to see whether I'm displaying/feeling symptoms of this.

    In biological terms what happens when we graft? I know the muscles no longer store as much glucose for energy due to the condition but If I'm continually exerting myself what is the chain of events?

    Does the liver dump a bunch of glucose in the system on being low for a while? How can this help if it is the receptors on the muscles that are faulty?
     
  7. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    PP, you are a Type 2 on diet only. Although you may go hypo in the sense that your Bg level drops below 4 mmol/L you will not have a life threatening event ! It is unpleasant, the feelings you get but you will not descend into anything that needs emergency hospital treatment. Your liver will see to that by 'dumping' and bringing your levels back up.

    Make sure your muscles are warmed up before you start work as you are unused to it !! You don't want to add muscle strain to the catalogue :shock:

    Your body stores glucose and fatty acids for these reactions. Your cardiovascular system provides a continuous supply of oxygen. Glycogen is stored in the muscles and liver in sufficient quantities for about two hours of strenuous exercise. After your glycogen stores are used up your body obtains its energy from fatty acid metabolism and amino acid protein metabolism.
     
  8. PickledPepper

    PickledPepper · Well-Known Member

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    Just to report back. Survived the first days with no problems.


    Thanks for the advice guys!
     
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