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Very worried newbie. Type 2.

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by kerrysmithies, Oct 2, 2015.

  1. kerrysmithies

    kerrysmithies Type 2 · Member

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    Hi I'm Kerry and have just been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and I am frightened to death!!!!!
    My initial blood test results showed 12.5 and then after waiting for a month to see the diabetic nurse she confirmed it and gave me a prescription for Metformin which I started yesterday. She didn't give me a monitor but I got one from the doctors anyway and as am sure most people would do was curious to see what my levels were like. My first reading was 12.5 my second after I just had food was 13.9 and this morning after fasting it was 14.2, is this normal for a diabetic??
    I don't know if it was the medication but I felt sick all night and have a banging headache, as I'm new to all this I'm probably making myself worse by worrying. Thanks for any information x
     
  2. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kerry and welcome. @daisy1 will be along soon with your welcome pack of information about diabetes.

    There's no need to be frightened of T2 diabetes, with some lifestyle changes and regular health checks it is all manageable.

    Your blood glucose (BG) results are normal for a newly diagnosed diabetic. Daisy1's post will get you started on learning how to reduce those numbers.

    Feeling sick and having a headache are signs of high BGs, but they might also be medication side effects. What dose of metformin are you on and did you start at the full dose or are you increasing it slowly? If you are having side effects they should settle within a couple of weeks but if they don't or you feel really unwell the please see your nurse or doctor again as soon as you need to.
     
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  3. kerrysmithies

    kerrysmithies Type 2 · Member

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    I'm on 500g of Metformin but I'm on just one at my evening meal for a few days and then one at breakfast and evening meal for another few days and then after a week three a day. I've probably had diabetes for a while because of the symptoms I have but now I know I'm worried about it. Thanks for you reply
     
  4. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Glad to hear you are increasing it slowly.

    I think it's normal to be worried about diabetes when newly diagnosed, especially if your doctor or nurse told you about complications we can get if our blood glucose levels don't come down. What specific worries do you have? Hopefully we can help you work through them and give you information that will help. Living with diabetes does get easier.
     
  5. kjsmith

    kjsmith Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kerry and welcome, as @CatLadyNZ says there's no need to be frightened of T2 which you will learn given time.
    I was knocked sideways by my diagnosis just a month ago and my levels were sky high and, according to my DN, had been for months (Hba1c was 13.2).
    My very first self test of fasting was 21.1
    However with medication a change in my eating habits,monitoring and the great support and sharing of experiences and tips found on this forum I have managed to grab my T2 by the throat and get my levels down to almost within my target range ( still a struggle with liver dumping some mornings)
    Once you get to grips with it all and get the results of all the effort it does wonders for your self esteem and whenever you feel like you're struggling? Well I've found there's always someone on here to share the load - one big family :)
     
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  6. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @kerrysmithies

    Hello Kerry and welcome to the forum :) After a while you will get used to having diabetes then it won't seem so bad. You have done the right thing to join this forum - that way you are not alone and you have loads of support. If there is anything you need to know just ask and someone will be able to help. Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  7. sanguine

    sanguine Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kerry, welcome :)

    Very well done on getting yourself a meter, you'd be surprised how many T2 diabetics are not curious enough to want to know (maybe not those on here though!). But they are essential in managing the condition, specifically on testing the impacts of meals.

    The other essential is reducing carbohydrates, not just obvious sugars. Carbohydrates metabolise quickly to sugar in the bloodstream. Preferably avoid potatoes, rice, pasta and bread. Your DN may have advised differently on diet and shown you the Eatwell (!) Plate full of starchy carbs. Many on here choose to ignore that advice.

    But don't panic, you can manage this - have a good read around including the items linked in my sig below and good luck.

    PS don't be tempted into thinking the metformin will significantly lower your BG levels - it won't, you have to do most of it with diet.
     
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  8. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi and welcome. If the stomach problems with the Metformin don't clear up, do ask the GP for the Slow Release (SR) version. Can I ask if you have excess weight and how old you are?
     
  9. 4ratbags

    4ratbags Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum. You are in the right place to get yourself on track. If you have any questions don't be afraid to ask , we are a helpful bunch. Most of us started out with high BS when we were diagnosed but with some dietary and lifestyle changes you should be able to see them starting to lower. Its great that you managed to get a meter as it is an essential tool in your diabetes management.
     
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  10. Adybaby80

    Adybaby80 · Newbie

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    What's liver dumping! Am new sorry
     
  11. kjsmith

    kjsmith Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  12. Pollylocks

    Pollylocks Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kerry and welcome to this forum :)

    Good that you have a meter...if you test before eating then one hour afterwards you'll see the highest the bs will shoot to and the effect your food has had, then it should be back down after two hours.

    Having said that, we're all individuals with the 'numbers' spectrum, some foods may affect you and others not. On the whole, pasta, bread, rice and potatoes will more than likely affect your bs as has been said because these carbs all turn to sugar in the blood as well as the obvious sugary foods. I can tolerate rice and milk chocolate [not together lol ;) ] whereas most can't. So your bs meter is your best friend and will tell you whats okay for you.

    You'll be fine :)
     
  13. Roytaylorjasonfunglover

    Roytaylorjasonfunglover Family member · Well-Known Member

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    http://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/diabetes/reversal.htm
     
  14. kerrysmithies

    kerrysmithies Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks for all your comments. I'm a carb lover and have started WW and doing the filling and healthy but are using wholewheat everything, rice pasta bread and also eating loads of fruit and veg because I need to lose weight. I'm struggling to understand what fruit I can eat as I understand some are better than others. Trying to loose weight as well as trying to get the diabetes right is so hard any food recommendations and the dos and donts would be appreciated X thanks
     
  15. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In short, I recommend reducing carbs and eating enough fats to avoid carb cravings and replace energy lost from reducing carbs.
     
  16. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Most people don't suffer bad side effects from metformin, and it has several benefits besides reducing BGs. It's just that newly diagnosed people often think metformin will be the main way to get their BGs down, when it only does this a little bit. Food is more important for reducing BGs in T2. Metformin also suppresses appetite and reduces the liver dump, so it's good for overweight T2s. And it's good for T1s who have insulin resistance. If someone is having really bad side effects after trying the slow release version for at least 2 weeks, then they should discuss with their HCP whether to stop taking it. There's no need to go on for months or years in such cases.
     
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  17. sanguine

    sanguine Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kerry
    You may find that WW programmes have more carbs than many can tolerate. Just because it's wholemeal may not make any difference, you will have to use your meter to find out. For now I would say that BG control is more important than weight loss, but with the right foods that will likely follow anyway. As you may have read I do LCHF (www.dietdoctor.com) - don't be afraid of full fat foods!
    As for fruit, berries are best for us, some can deal with moderate amounts of apple, tropical fruits (oranges, bananas) and grapes are best avoided.
     
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