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Wear a bracelet that says you have diabetes!

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by TheBigNewt, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Second @kev-w .
    As pointed out.................
    Occasionally, sometimes, maybe we can become a little awkward, argumentative, abusive, really f*****g aggressive.
    Please bear with us for we know not what we do.
    We will in time return to being really nice, it just may take a few minutes.
    Each and everyone of us will really be truly grateful that you helped us.
     
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  2. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Good question.

    If you're sure it's a hypo situation (that's sometimes not that easy - there's not a lot of difference between the presentation of an epilectic having a fit and a T1 at sub 2), my take on it is that if they are still conscious and able to eat safely, give them some fast acting carbs immediately.

    Don't ***** about with the amount - we can talk till the cows come home about the appropriate amount to treat a hypo without overtreating. - but if you've got someone who looks like they're heading for the floor, I'd be doing a full can of Coke or a Mars bar or any available simple sugar and worrying about the hyper later.

    I had some very bad and extremely public hypos in my first few months after dx. I'm glad I've learned enough now to put those in the past. What I learned from them, though, is that while well meaning people will step out of their way to help me, if a T1 is too low, our brains work in a very different way, so it's not actually that easy to answer constant questions about how are you doing. Don't quiz a hypo T1 when they're still coming up, don't ask them if they're doing ok: speaking when hypo can be difficult. Provided you've stuffed a Mars bar or Coke in our face, we'll be fine, and we'll deal with the over-treatment later.

    If unconscious, see if there's an orange box with the words "glucagon" on it anywhere near, see if you can figure out how inject that, but definitely dial 999 before that!
     
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  3. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The first thing Ambo's are taught to do is look at your phone. I assume we can't mention brands here so mine is a fruit and it has a section to add medical. That is now my medical bracelet.
     
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  4. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Exept those of us who were a******s in the first place of course.
     
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  5. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If anyone comes near me with a mars bar or coke, they're going home in a body bag, hypo or not.

    Speak for yourself. On third thoughts I need a wrist band with LEAVE ME ALONE on it.

    And no, I wasn't really nice to begin with.
     
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  6. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In 2016 I, on an unthought through impulse, signed up to run a half marathon in 2017. I hadn't done an awful lot of road running before that, I just used to run on a treadmill and staff at the gym knew I was diabetic, or at least I had ticked the box on the health questionnaire form when joining the gym. I only ever used to wear a medical alert bracelet when road running and it annoyed me to an unreasonable degree, I think my tolerance becomes quite limited when I'm running. So I gave up with the bracelet and got a tattoo that says 'diabeT1c' on my left wrist. I've never had to rely on it when running, but it has been used when a guy at work, who used to be a doctor, spotted it while I was making a cup of tea one day. He got put in charge of my first aid when I passed out hypo at work about a week later. All the other times I've passed out (there have been several) I've just been at home so help comes from my parents when they can't get hold of me. But I like my tattoo, it gives me confidence that if anything were to happen a first aider or paramedic attending would at least be prompted to check my blood sugar. And when the security guard at the airport starts looking distressed when she pats me down and finds my insulin pump it's dealt with by pointing at my tattoo and shrugging.
     
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  7. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well you talk the talk ( a lot )
    I'm not stopping you from walking the walk.
    You definitely will not be the first to have " Do not resuscitate " emblazoned about yourself.
     
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  8. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Oddly, I used to know someone with a similar attitude towards medical assistance. (A non diabetic, but prone to ODing on substances..)
    I used to dial 999 & stand well back..
    The police tend to accompany paramedics during such events. Needless to say the care involved is not dignified for the patient as she was eventually taken into police custody.. ;)
     
  9. WuTwo

    WuTwo Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't have a fruity phone but do have an ICE app on my lock screen. If they tap it they'll see my medical details and emergency contact but absolutely won't have access to the rest of my phone. That was an essential for me. I have a large Korean Company phone running Marshmallow.

    I also have a bracelet that is actually a vintage silver charm bracelet but with a medical alert small pendant on it. Pretty but still has a cadeuceus and ICE on the front, but unscrews to give my medical details on a tiny bit of (waterproof) paper.
     
  10. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hey, look on the bright side - T1 has given you something to moan about!
     
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  11. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    OK
     
  12. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    What's the name of that App?
     
  13. WuTwo

    WuTwo Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I got the paid version of Medical ID ICE by Laurence Pellegrini from the Play Store. I think the not paid version does it as well. I did have to enable lock screen notifications for that app (I usually have them all turned off). I think the paid for version was £3.50 or so. Hardly a fortune for peace of mind!
     
  14. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    On my Android's lock screen I have the Quoll medical id card and qr code showing as well.

    Here's a pix with the qr code partially removed so I remain anonymous on this forum.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    Would you be willing to post a photo of your tattoo, please? I’d love to see it :) I’m thinking of getting one but I have quite a lot of ink already and I’m not sure it would be spotted, especially as I wear many bangles on both wrists. Maybe I should get one on my forehead? ;)
     
  16. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Something people with Type2 not taking meds/inslin with a risk of Hypos need to consider.

    The standard basic first aid training is,
    Check airways, then if diabetes add sugar (or carbs) unless a great risk of choking. (Then move onto next person, or call 999 etc.)
    So if you are Type2 and diet controlled (or just taking metformin) it may be best not to put the word "diabetes" into the mind of anyone doing first aid. (Medics in the UK will have access to your basic records if they know your name and date of birth, and if you are none responsive they will check BG anyway. But if you are taking SGLT2 inhibitors, they need to know due to the risk of DKA without a very high BG.)

    I don't like the Quoll medical id card etc being the only way a first aider has no know someone has diabetes and is on inslin, they take too long to read, and there may not be a phone signal etc. But they are great for the next stage of the process once first-aid has been done, and the person is safely waiting for the experts to arrive.

     
  17. karen8967

    karen8967 Type 1 · Master

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    erm whats mid forties got to do with it :wideyed:
     
  18. db89

    db89 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have the emergency information filled out in my phone but don't wear anything. I've noticed on both iOS and Android the emergency information/Medical ID has been getting progressively more hidden on the lock screens since they introduced them so can't see it being of much use unless someone savvy happened to check my phone.
     
  19. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I installed an ICE app. Appears on home screen and alerts. Thanks.
     
  20. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That's my tattoo. I reckon it's fairly difficult to miss, especially if someone was taking my pulse. My other tattoo is fairly well hidden on my wrists. But I guess if you've got a full sleeve of ink going on then you could consider something a bit more obviously medical, like the caduceus emblem. Or forehead is an option!
     

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    #80 catapillar, Jan 26, 2018 at 6:59 PM
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
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