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what do you guys suggest for breakfast?

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by howie, Jul 31, 2009.

  1. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Hi Graham.

    You snuck in under my radar. :D :twisted:

    Liked your link about the Eggs. Made interesting reading as I love Eggs but never have more than two a week because my Arteries got furred up with cholesterol from whatever source some years ago. Major Heart Op and I don't want to ruin the emminent surgeon's work on me ?

    Your link : I thought this looks good, some independent advice to eat more Eggs. Can't be bad ?

    Then I took a closer look and what do I find ? It was actually a paper from the British Egg Information Service ? Who they ? You ask.

    The British Egg Information Service (BEIS) has been set up by the British Egg Industry Council (BEIC) to answer queries about eggs from the general public, education and professional sectors, as well as from the media. Please visit our BEIS consumer web site at www.britegg.co.uk for more information.

    So. They are'nt independent and I think they want us to buy more Eggs ? No vested interest there then ?

    I'll stick to my two a week mate. :wink:

    Ken.
     
  2. cugila

    cugila · Master

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  3. Spiral

    Spiral · Well-Known Member

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    Just to keep this vaguley relevant to breakfast, I did experiement with the Fabuous Frapuccino this morning and made it a bit thicker, but my blood sugar shot up, I suspect from a major liver dump and my very poor morning eating habits at weekends :oops: Didn't eat until gone 10.30 again :oops: so I don't know if the rise was due to swapping soya cream for double cream and soya isolate powder for whey isolate powder, as I doubt adding slightly more tofu made much of a difference to the overall carb content. However, my 12-year-old had a glass of the mixture this morning and pronounced it delicious :D :D :D

    red, you need to educate and inform yourself. You also need to be very clear about what you want from the medical team supporting you and stick to your agenda. You need to develop skills in not being distracted by patronising comments about your ability to understand them :evil: It takes a lot of courage to reject the advice of your doctors. You have made a really good start judging by your numbers so far :D

    I had gestational diabetes in 1997, I was being tested and monitored in a clinic run by the diabetic consultant and my obstetrician. I eventually said "do I have gestaional diabetes", I didn't get an answer :evil: The diabetic conutlant simply said "Ooh! You are a sharp one, aren't you?" :evil: :evil: :evil: I missed the clinic where I would have got the diagnosis beacuse I was giving birth at the time :roll: I eventually got my diagnosis of gestational diabetes when my son was 8 and I was invited to my GPs regular diabetic clinic - this was 4 years pre-diagnosis :|

    I know medicine saves peoples lives, but it isn't always right and it isn't the precise science we'd like to believe it is :? Doctors get things wrong and they have off days - even the excellent ones, like my GP. And some of them feel very threatened by informed patients :roll: My relationship with the doctors that treat me is based on then diagnosing what is wrong. Then they can present me with the treatment options and I can make an infomed decision about what I will do about it, and this includes not following the advice they give.

    I do not accept the standard advice the NHS gives diabetics is helpful to me. This is that I should follow a diet based on glucose (which is what starchy carbohydrate turns in to) and take medication to counteract the effects :? For me to be able to manage my condition and maximise my potential for good health I need to understand the chemistry and what else can be done to deal with the problem.

    I also tend to work on the principle that if I don't have a choice the medics will be saying things like - you will die if you don't do this within the next few minutes :? Diabetes isn't like that, if we get diagnosed fairly early we get a few years to educate ourselves and make some changes :mrgreen: I have been working in units of 3-6 months and would become much more compliant if I was concerned about the results I was getting.

    For example, when I called my GP at the end of January complaining of chest pain I followed the advice to the letter. I turned up at the surgery the same day and he checked me over, I took the asprin he prescribed and he refered me very promptly to the cardiac clinic. The outcome is that the chest pain tuned out to be muscular pain combined with anxiety (there is no evidence of heart disease) and the blood work picked up unacceptably high blood sugars. I have taken his advice to lose weght, but not to take metformin.

    Since then we have established that I don't have retinopathy, other tests done by my podiatrist show that I probably don't have neuropathy, and the regular blood tests show my numbers are improving. Regular contact with my GP also shows he is the one now plagued with anxiety about my rapidly improving health :roll: :D

    I went in to a bit of a tailspin about the diagnosis to start with and read around. I accidentally stumbled upon http://www.bloodsugar101.comat a very early stage and it directed me towards all kinds of alternative and much more positive ways of managing diabetes that gave me hope that it didn't have to be progressive. Then I found this website and have used the info I have acquired from other diabetics who post here (and who have the kind of control I aspire to) to manage my diabetes by reducing the carbs.

    If you are looking for online information to educate yourself I'd suggest looking at bloodsugar101 and also David Mendosa's website http://www.mendosa.com and http://www.dsolve.com and Alan (who posts here occasionally) http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com/2006/10/d-day.html

    This is all good sound information that will help you to understand the information present in your numbers and will help you to ask questions.

    You will also need to develop a few assertiveness skills including not getting angry when they patronise you and use of the broken record technique to keep it simple and persist. Also, asking for a double appointment when you need time to discuss something is a technique that works for me.

    We do the best we can, as often as we can with what we have got. We base the decsions we make on the information we have at the time we make them. Taking medication to treat your diabetes isn't a failure, but developing avoidable complications because of poor advice or not knowing how to interpret the advice is.

    PS, I'd start with bloodsugar101 even if it is American and the numbers are in differnt units - just divide the American numbers by 18
     
  4. red

    red · Well-Known Member

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    Thankyou spiral.

    I dont know if this will help anyone?, on the subject of breakfast for the past 4 days at 5.45am I have eaten 5 almonds nuts and then another 5 at about 6.30am. when I have got up and done my bg it has been about 2 clear points less than previously, and then it has helped me to control things better during the whole day. so my starting point is now 7 instead of 8 or 9. Im certainly not giving out advice but just wanted to share it. :D
     
  5. Spiral

    Spiral · Well-Known Member

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    You are not the first one to suggest this to me red :oops: :oops: :oops:

    Gone are the days I'd scoff whatever was in front of me early in the morning because I was ravenously hungry :| I woke up at about 6.30 this morning, went to the loo and back to bed, ignoring the nuts by the bed, which may have prevented the liver dump if I'd eaten them. I didn't check my blood sugar until I got up at 9.30 :oops: :oops:

    The positive side is that at least the nuts are there :roll: and I can see that eating them has worked for you :D I wonder if something that involved slightly less work to consume (all that chewing when I just want to sleep) might be easier to handle :?
     
  6. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Hi Spiral.
    Blood Sugar 101 and US numbers.

    The conversion for the US to UK readings is not quite right . What you should remember is this,
    NOTE: All blood sugar levels discussed on these pages refer to plasma calibrated meter readings which are the readings used by all meters sold in the United States. In other parts of the world where blood calibrated are still in use, including the UK, users should divide the numbers given here by 1.12 to get the blood calibrated equivalents.

    The way to convert US plasma calibrated numbers on BS101 is to take the number, say 140 mg/dl then divide it by 1.12 to convert to blood calibrated readings, then divide that number by 18 to give the UK mmol/l figure

    This is the example: 140mg/dl divided by 1.12 =125, THEN divide by 18 to give 6.9 mmol/l.

    Nothings ever easy is it.

    This little snippet is courtesy of another website member elsewhere. Thank you.

    Ken.
     
  7. Spiral

    Spiral · Well-Known Member

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    :shock:

    Early in my dalliance with that site I found something she had written aimed at us Brits and conversion and I think Jenny has a conversion chart for us somewhere on her website.

    I tend to look at the advice rather than the numbers :oops: although I do actually speak American and can translate in to English when required. I have even taught English as a foreign language to some of my American friends :roll:
     
  8. graham64

    graham64 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Ken,

    There is an acknowledgement in the study

     

    http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi- ... /HTMLSTART


    This is a smaller study that may be of interest to you. :D

    http://www.simply4doctors.co.uk/?itemId=6315984




    Cheers Mate
    Graham
     

    Attached Files:

  9. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Hi Graham.

    You shouldn't have gone to all that trouble. I made my mind up about Eggs years ago. It hasn't changed. Thanks anyway. I will have a read though.

    Ken. :D
     
  10. curlyheadfreak

    curlyheadfreak · Member

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    Spinach (lots), broccoli, cucumber, celery, sugar snap peas :D I love my green juice in the morning. I used to have to put an apple in too but I've got used to stomaching it without now and when I put an apple in the other day it tasted too sweet!
     
  11. gbswales

    gbswales · Well-Known Member

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    all cooked?

    I am used to throwing weetabix and milk into a bowl and munching while I check my email - cooking bacon and eggs at the weekend may be an idea - but what substitutes are the that match the speed of weetabix and dont involve cooking to fill me up in the week!
     
  12. byatt

    byatt · Member

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    I know you're not asking about cooking, but scrambled egg takes what? a minute to cook?

    I tend to put a slice or 2 of bacon in the frying pan as I fill the kettle/feed the dog/feed the fish/look at my mail...then whisk 2 eggs together, and scramble...

    others will come in with good non cooking suggestions, but I find the cooked brekafast takes no more time than weetabix and defrosting some berries.
     
  13. gbswales

    gbswales · Well-Known Member

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    well into week three I think now of some sort of casual carbing (thats my word for it) - tried cooked breakfast but unless I have been up for an hour or more it is just not enjoyable - and I am not going to add "getting up earlire than I need to" to the list of diabetes pains :lol:

    Eating is a very psychological thing and I have never been one to eat anything that I didnt like so for long term control (rather than short term dieting) it is essential to enjoy what you eat. I tried a few things, eggs bacon tomatoes etc but in the end have returned to my two weetabix with sweetner milk and sugar. Oddly while I hate the taste of milk as a drink (it makes me feel sick) I adore it with cereal or tea and coffee. So if I substitute for cereal then I need to subsitute for the milk as well. I found little difference between my blood levels before lunch on days when I had 2 weetabix or the days when I had bacon or eggs - ergo it makes sense to me to eat the food I enjoy.

    Somehow my routine breakfast makes me feel "normal" and that is important to me - I dont want to FEEL that I am doing anything special to control diabetes (even though of course I actually am) call it "responsible denial" - I want to walk out each day not thinking that I have hemophilia and diabetes.
     
  14. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Hi gbswales.

    Have you tested 1 and 2 hrs after your cereal breakfast to see what the readings are. They are more important than your pre-lunch readings ?
     
  15. Spiral

    Spiral · Well-Known Member

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    What Ken said :(

    I have been getting some very high morning readings recently (probably liver dumps and poor eating patterns due to having been on holiday) but my numbers are returing to normal before I have my lunch.
     
  16. inwales

    inwales · Well-Known Member

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    Have upped my vegan protein intake, much low waking BG levels and for brekkie now have a vegan soya powder.

    Anyone have the vegan pea protein powder?
     
  17. JohnD54

    JohnD54 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    2 flat mushrooms, stuffed with Camembert cheese and bacon bits, topped by slices of tomatoes.

    Baked in the oven.

    Scrummy




    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
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