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What is the minimum training time for a pump?

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by Geoff, Jan 21, 2009.

  1. Geoff

    Geoff · Well-Known Member

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    Hi pumpers, I am not a pumper but have been trying to get approval for one for the last two years, I came close to approval this week at my annual review, only for my hopes to be dashed by a technicality, I have been told that in principal I can be given a pump but because I work overseas for long periods each year, spending only a maximum of three weeks at a time back in the U.K. on leave. I have been told by my diabetic specialist that I need at least five continuous weeks in the U.K. for training to satisfy the requirements to issue a pump for my usage.

    My question is, how long was your training period before you were let loose on your own?
     
  2. Stuboy

    Stuboy · Well-Known Member

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    Im not on a pump yet... but hoping to get one soon.

    From speaking to the nurse at my PCT, it sounds like they like to be in weekly contact for the first 6weeks, then monthly for 6 months after that.

    I guess it depends on your PCT, and your personal circumstances.
     
  3. Steveee

    Steveee · Active Member

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    Most PCTs insist that before going on a pump, you go on a carbohydrate counting course such as BERTIE or DAFNE. My comments below are based on my experience im my local area.

    My local BERTIE course runs over 4 weeks (1 session per week). After each session you are given homework. :( However, the outcome of this homework can be used as part of your pump training, e.g. you calculate insulin sensitivity (how much insulin to drop BG by 1 unit) and carb ratio (how much insulin you need for 10gms CHO). The reason pump training is not integrated into BERTIE or DAFNE is that this training is used for all type 1 diabetics, not just those going onto a pump.

    Only after you complete the carbohydrate counting course are you given an appointment for an insulin pump. This is then run over a week - session 1 is to train you on the pump (set it up, programme it and put the infusion set in) and session 2 is to check it is working correctly.

    The other potential issue would be access to the consumables, e.g. canulas. These are generally only sent to your home address in the UK.
     
  4. Geoff

    Geoff · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reply, I have done all the courses needed and more! My question is how long do you need for dummy training before they let you use a pump on your own?
     
  5. Steveee

    Steveee · Active Member

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    I do not believe that there is a strict guideline, but most trainers will follow guidance from the pump manufaturers.

    After completing the CHO counting course, my actual pump training took 2 sessions of approximately 1 hour each! 1st session was choosing the infusion set; how to programme the pump; confirming basal and carb/insulin ratio; inserting and priming the infusion set. As I got on so well, I started the pump there and then!

    Came back next day to check everything was working and I was let loose! That was 2 years ago, so this may have been tightened up.
     
  6. albannach2

    albannach2 · Active Member

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    Hi Geoff, this is a hard one to answer as like MDI everyone is different :( I would guess in your circumstances that you have to learn pretty quickly anyway so you'd be well up to speed with learning things quickly. I didnt have any prep training for getting the pump as I was getting lots of very low hypos every day, so had a two hour session and then went back after a month for a check up, plus regular monthly checkups or so, but like I say it depends how well you learn new things etc.

    Good luck for when you do get it, btw two very good tips were given to me before I started by a fellow member of this forum:

    1) Gets lots of extra blood testing strips in, you're going to need them
    2) Buy some scales that measure carbo content of food, vital for pumping as you need to be as accurate as you can.
     
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