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What rise is acceptable 2 hours after eating?

Discussion in 'Blood Glucose Monitoring' started by Renfield, May 27, 2015.

  1. Renfield

    Renfield Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi

    I am just starting testing, and was was wondering, when I test 2 hours after I eat, what rise is acceptable.

    So, I tested rice crispies today and went from 7.5 to 14.3 which is a big No.

    But yesterday, I had dinner and went from 5.2 - 8.9. This seems like a significant rise, But as it is below 10(and close to 8.5), do i take that as being a success? partial success? or is it still too much of a rise?


    I have read about levels, but just looking for a rough idea, on how much of a rise means that food is going to be ok?

    Ren
     
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  2. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi, you can check recommended levels for normal, type 2 and type 1 diabetics here. It's best to try for a maximum 2.0 mmol/L spike after meals where possible, as well as trying to keep below the 8.5 ceiling. As you get better control, you may then wish to aim for readings closer to normal levels, which is what many type 2s here do.

    Just avoid all foods with high sugar and starch levels to start getting your glucose levels down and stable, and then you can test to see how well you might be able to tolerate any of these foods you might still want to eat.

    Robbity
     
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  3. Renfield

    Renfield Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thanks for the reply.

    A rise of 2 makes perfect sense. And gives me a good basis to work forward on.

    I am already working out what works and what doesn't. Sadly most of the things i normally eat are a no, even in small quantities, but it something i need to know and get used too.
     
  4. marilynafrost

    marilynafrost · Member

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    I was told to test 3 times a day prior to eating a meal, It has never been suggested that I test again 2 hrs after a meal and in fact I would need an increase in my monthly prescription of test strips to do this. But it makes perfect sense. I will start tomorrow and hope the gp will increase the test strip prescription.
     
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  5. brettsza

    brettsza Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's best to do fasting, before meal, 1 hour after meal and 2 hours after meal to see what is really spiking you a lot.
    That's how I test but now I know what will spike me so that's out of menu, I do fasting, before dinner and after dinner. If I eat a high carb meal I do 1 and 2 hours test.
     
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  6. PatsyB

    PatsyB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    yes test before and two hours afterwards I find my level still high two hours afterwards though so make it three hours when it seems to have dropped again ;)
     
  7. Diamattic

    Diamattic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Its really a tricky question. My doctor has told me that my before meal readings should be below 5mmol/L and my 2 hours post meals should be below 7mmol/L.

    That being said, frequently i will be <5mmol/l and shoot up to 10+ 2 hours post, but then at 3 hours post be back down below 7.

    It really all depends on what the glycemic index of your meal is, and how long you wait after injecting and before eating. If i inject and eat within 15 minutes i will almost ALWAYS rise at least 4-5mmol/L if i wait 30+ after injecting before eating i typically have a very small rise.

    So its really a trial and error game, with the end goal being - how flat can you keep your sugars? lol
     
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  8. RuthW

    RuthW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Are you Type 1 or Type 2? If you are Type 2, then you may need to change what you eat. If you are Type 1, you may only need to change the timing of your pre-meal injections.
     
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  9. auburn

    auburn Type 2 · Member

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    Hello! I am new to bg monitoring, and am starting to test various foods to see what is good and what is bad for me personally.
    Before my breakfast, I was 10.1. Yummy breakfast, and then waited 2 hours and I was 16.8. That's not good, is it.
     
  10. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    No, it's not ... what did you eat?
     
  11. Clivethedrive

    Clivethedrive Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It is ,but the consequences for getting it wrong ie higher than 6.8 are ......
     
  12. auburn

    auburn Type 2 · Member

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    Beans and a poached egg, with a slice of home made low carb bread. I think I am ok with the bread, as that hasn't had much of an impact on my readings, but I'd read mixed reactions to beans. Looks like I'm probably in the "no" camp, which is a shame.. Its odd, you feel like you're doing good following the "eat well" plate idea, and looks like their balanced meal is actually one of the worst things I could have - I'd be better off with a bag of maltesers!
     
  13. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    @auburn Try it without the bread .... even if it IS home made. The beans could also be a factor. Just go with the eggs, add bacon and enjoy. Then test again. What was your fasting BS level by the way? A spike of 6+ (at two hours) is far too high.

    One might expect that at one hour, even with the wrong foods (or those that disagree with you), but at 2 hours, something needs change. You'll get there :)

    Mike
     
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  14. auburn

    auburn Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks @Mike D
    I will try again with no bread, see how that fares. My reading when I got up was 10.1 and I agree, I felt that +6 was a bit much.

    I will certainly get there. I've been "en route" to diabetes for a long time, and buried my head in the sand. But it's real now, I need to stop punishing my pancreas! Surprisingly positive :)

    I shall report back on BeanGate tomorrow morning!
     
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  15. Renfield

    Renfield Type 2 · Active Member

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    I find it weird that certain foods work for some people and others they do not.

    For example I can eat an apple and banana( one after the other)then after 2 hours my BG is fine. Others could not.

    I can also tolerate some porridge(30g), wholemeal pasta (50g) and potatoes (100g)

    Maybe I am lucky, but so far they all have not put my levels up more than 2.

    My starting BG was 20.7 a month ago and now it has not been above 6 for a week.

    You'll get there
     
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  16. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    :) Good. It is a LOT of trial and error. Throw in the other factors (weight, exercise, water intake, other conditions you might have) and it's a complex game. A complete rework might of diet be worth a try. You'll hate it at first (we all do) but a bland set of meals will do you good (fish (no batter) lean meats, eggs, and heaps of above ground veg) and then you can try other foods gradually, but not before you get those numbers back to single digits.

    I look forward to the report :)
     
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  17. Diamattic

    Diamattic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Getting it higher then 6.8 is fine, Getting it higher then 7.8mmol/L CAN have damaging effects...

    I only say it like that because it has been shown that BS higher then 7.8 cause some forms of damage, but the severity is different for everyone, and it is time dependent. A spike to 10, and back down to 6 where you're only over 7.8 for 1 hour may yield no noticeable effects over the course of someones lifetime.

    Its all about how these 'highs' build up over time. In my books quick spikes aren't my largest concern. If i see that my sugars jump 8+ and i can get them back <7.8 all in a 2 hour window Its okay in my books. Its when they jump 8+ and stay there for 4+ hours constantly that i would start to worry and re-think my management plan.

    Its all about noticing the problem asap, and returning then BS to a normal level asap. No ones perfect so we all just need to do what we can do knowing when to take action.
     
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  18. Clivethedrive

    Clivethedrive Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree , but higher than 6.8 for any length is having an effect albeit hardly noticeable, but over time it will cause neuropathy.it's spikes of more than 2 mmol that are to be avoided if poss
     
  19. Diamattic

    Diamattic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have never heard of >6.8 leaving any lasting effect. Would you be able to cite your sources for this? I am not trying to be negative, I am just interested in reading that research and how they determined the effects.

    I have read papers stating readings greater then 7.8 cause damage, but never anything lower :/
     
  20. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    @Clivethedrive, I'd be interested in seeing the source of your 6.8 as well as I've only ever seen 7.8 quoted (and of course non-diabetics often go above 6.8 naturally).
     
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