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What was the most extreme reaction????????

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by JUSTFOCUS, Apr 13, 2011.

  1. JUSTFOCUS

    JUSTFOCUS · Well-Known Member

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    it would be intresting to compare the most extreme reaction to informing anyone about your diabetes diagnosis?????
     
  2. viviennem

    viviennem Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Mine was the most extreme - to my doctor on diagnosis:

    "I'm not!"

    However, I did take heed and went straight back to low-carbing while doing research - finally let them register me a few weeks later.

    No-one else has actually said anything too bad, but I do get the feeling that one or two are expecting me to drop dead any second - or to go blind as my feet drop off!

    Viv 8)
     
  3. TheSparkyPony

    TheSparkyPony · Well-Known Member

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    I screamed, cried and wouldn't let any nurse near me, never mind with any needles!

    I'd gone from happy eating coco pops in the morning to be told I had to cut down on all my sugar intake and to inject myself and test my blood.

    I was 7, so think I could be let off, but to be honest I think I'd have the same reaction now! :lol:
     
  4. Debloubed

    Debloubed Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My GP - 'hmmm, high glucose reading in your urine, you have Diabetes'
    Me (13 and obnoxious) - 'I'm NOT injecting myself.' (I'd read the book Sugar Mouse you see, without realising I was on my way to being diagnosed so obviously, I knew all about it :wink: )
    My GP - 'we'll see about that!'

    Next day, I gave myself my first injection and the rest, as they say, is history!
     
  5. Lucie75

    Lucie75 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Can't remember my reaction - was only 9 at the time, probable just took it in my stride - ignorance is bliss and all that - didn't even know what being a diabetic meant.

    My mum, however, had to leave me in hospital and apparently sobbed all the way home :(
     
  6. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    I didn't believe it and asked for a re-test. Before the second test I ate no carbs at all and didn't drink a drop of alcohol for several days in order become non-diabetic :? The miracle I was expecting didn't happen and I was diagnosed anyway. I still didn't believe it for a very long time and did nothing about looking after myself. I didn't know how anyway as nobody told me. Slowly it sank in and I made an appointment with an endo. After a while I discovered this forum :) And that's when the story really starts...

    However, to answer the question that JF actually asked :lol: everyone was very polite and kept their thoughts to themselves but I could imagine them thinking "serves her right she's fat" (not any more though :) thanks to my diagnosis)
     
  7. Ka-Mon

    Ka-Mon · Well-Known Member

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    After the OGTT the Doc said "no question about it, you are diabetic", I looked at my wife, licked my right index finger and making a "chalk mark" in the air I said "Add another one to the list".

    I've somehow lucky though because everone I've told that I am diabetic seem to be blissfully ignorant of the disease and none asked if I am now going to die, lose my legs or go blind.
     
  8. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    You have diabetes!!!!! :shock:...... No explanation or advice on what to do except a leaflet thrust into my hand and sent on my way after being told the hospital would ring.

    Thankfully this doctor was near retirement age and I didn't get to see him much after diagnosis! :D

    Nigel
     
  9. sailorj

    sailorj Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    some have been odd!

    A nursing friends who said 'Oh dear no, how will you manage?'

    to relatives who have said 'well your grandfather died of it at 54' (he was T1 and I'm T2 & 47) so not very cheerful but my grandmother was T2 and lived to be 92!

    and some colleagues have said - 'but your not fat' !
     
  10. grh1904

    grh1904 · Active Member

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    Did't happen directly to me but involved me................

    I live in England but mother still lives in Glasgow area. She was at a GP appointment and as part of the screening for the problem she was there with she was asked if there was a history of diabetes in the family.

    She told doc that I had been diagnosed a couple of years previously in my mid 30's. Doc apparently made a comment like "A big chap is he??", mum was a bit taken back and asked doc what he meant, he replied "It's a problem with men his age not eating well & being overweight".

    Mum told doc that I was 5 feet 11tall, weighed just under 12 stone could run a 10k in under 42mins, and while serving in the forces did a half marathon in under an hour & a half, she promptly got up & walked out - doc called after her saying he was still examining her. Mum went straight to reception and demanded to see another doctor as hers was apparently "ill informed & utterly useless".

    Mothers - don't ya just luv em.....................
     
  11. viviennem

    viviennem Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi grh1904

    I think some of us would like to borrow your mother to take with us when we visit HCPs!

    Viv 8)
     
  12. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    I got totally bladdered after being told by GP I was diabetic.....with an appointment to hospital the next day for 3 nights!!!!!! Can remember going round friends and drinking everything and anything I could whilst I could!!!!!!! (was only 22!!!). I was officically diagnosed on 6th Jan (too many years ago!!!!!) but had left it since Christmas day after I had thought I was diabetic. Had 10 days of enjoying myself enormously before being admitted offically to the world of d..... still enjoying myself now despite the d........
     
  13. grh1904

    grh1904 · Active Member

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    I vote that we make it law that every family has a "Glesga wumin" in their family............??? :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :wink:

    Oh dear, I really don't think the poor English could handle it.........................
     
  14. ShyGirl

    ShyGirl · Well-Known Member

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    I was in hospital when it happened and half out of it with an infection , DKA and other things. I think my boyf at the time whispered something about my using up all of the department's insulin but a couple of days after surgery a woman appeared and lectured me about having children , how to use a pen (I was diagnosed as T1 at first) and so on. So pointless , insensitive and scary.

    The next day was funny because I gave a nurse the shock of her life when I almost injected myself with 60 units instead of 10. We ended up laughing and I relaxed a bit.
    After returning home life was even more dark for a while as I avoided all foods and worried about what it meant. Looking back is weird as it's been worse than I feared but for different reasons.
     
  15. LittleSue

    LittleSue Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My own reaction was relief that there was a name for why I'd felt so ill recently and a treatment for it. Don't remember how it was all explained to me, but I remember thinking "the rest of my life" was an awfully long time.

    The most hurtful reaction was a year or so later. We went on a school outing and I took a diet drink with me as they weren't widely available then. Another kid asked why I was taking my own drink, I explained about diabetes and her response was "Haven't you grown out of that yet?" Ouch!
     
  16. kateincornwall

    kateincornwall Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Diabetes nurse rang me to tell me , was half expecting it as I`d had two blood tests and an oral glucose intolerance one . My reaction was to burst into tears and felt a proper wimp about it, but she was lovely and understanding . Worst reaction from others was from one of my adult children who said " Oh Mum , we cant lose you " Hummm , no intentions of being lost :lol:
     
  17. Sanober

    Sanober · Well-Known Member

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    My reaction upon being told was 'Ok, so how can I get rid of it?' :lol:

    Upon being told about annual feet check/retinal scans I said 'Oh come on is that not totally over the top now?'

    My parents (Type 2s) who are still in denial exclaimed 'But you're too young to have it...'

    My boss said he had a Type 1 friend who injects and eats chips all the time (thanks, so helpful)

    A work colleague actually remarked 'Well it's not exactly life threatening!' (thanks, even more helpful - but it's ok she's not a very popular person for her obtuse comments anyway)

    My husband's response was 'You're problem is that you're just too sweet' aaaaaw
     
  18. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    I like your style! :lol:

    Nigel
     
  19. Sanober

    Sanober · Well-Known Member

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    LOL - I think it was the denial stage of the emotions spectrum :roll: I thought it was a temporary thing that could be 'fixed' and the nurse looked at me with such a caring expression and told me it's a 'chronic condition'.
     
  20. sue32

    sue32 · Well-Known Member

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    I didn't react much really. My husband was T1 so I was used to 'living with it'! My grandmother had it, so did my mum, and my dad has it.......along with 2 of my aunties. So it was more of a .....'oh well..'
    One of my neighbours has just been diagnosed and his face and reaction was as if he'd been shot!! He's been told byt our GP nurse to stop all butter and fats, no sugar whatsoever!!! I'd have shot myself if I'd been told that....but I am a bit of a rebel!!
     
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