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What was your Hba1c when you were put on metformin?

Discussion in 'Metformin/Biguanides' started by Gracicles, Apr 1, 2016.

  1. Gracicles

    Gracicles Type 2 · Member

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    Hi everyone. I'm a newby. I was diagnosed last year with T2 when my Hba1c was 53 and told to control it with diet. I felt fine, didn't really listen if I'm honest and didn't make any diet changes. (Idiot I know) Recently I've been feeling terrible, incredibly tired and bad headaches so I had my Hba1c done again on Wednesday and it's 57 now They have prescribed me metformin which I will be starting next week. I was just wondering what other people's Hba1c was when they were first out on meds xx
    Thanks
     
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  2. Patricia21

    Patricia21 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi welcome.
    Mine was 58 Hba1c I was put on 1x500mg Metformin,but I think it was sensible eating that brought me down to 46.
    Im told that Metformin dosent do much to lower BS.
     
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  3. Gracicles

    Gracicles Type 2 · Member

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    Oh really? I thought that's what it's for, this is all so confusing! xx
     
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  4. Patient_

    Patient_ Type 2 · Newbie

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    I have found it helps with weight loss.
     
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  5. julie56

    julie56 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My initial hba1c was 111 - started on metformin straight away building up to 4 x 500 mg per day over period of one week. Diet and exercise do more to lower blood sugars than the pills. Takes a few weeks for metformin to build up in the system - it is a good safe drug that helps to lower glucose produced and released from the liver and also increases insulin sensitivity. Welcome to the forum by the way - you have come to the right place for all the help and advice you could wish for. It takes a while for it all to sink in, but it won't be long before you feel more in control and start feeling better. Good luck on your journey.
     
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  6. ladybird64

    ladybird64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome. I'm going to tag @daisy1 , who will come along with the info we give to all the newbies on the forum, it is really informative and should give you a clearer picture.
    To answer your question, I was diagnosed with an HbA1c of 7.5 (dunno what that is in new money!) in 2011. I chose to refuse Metformin, and got my levels down by lower carbing, have had non diabetic number for a few years now. Also lost 6 stones.:)
     
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  7. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @Gracicles

    Hello and welcome to the forum :) I was diagnosed at an HbA1c of 70, now several years later my HbA1c was 33. Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    LOW CARB PROGRAM:
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/low carb program


    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  8. Gracicles

    Gracicles Type 2 · Member

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    Hi everyone and thank you so much for your replies. The new member info is great!
    I have a test machine that I got free online but have run out of strips and it's £20 for more. Is there any way of getting them free does anyone know? x
     
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  9. PenfoldAPD

    PenfoldAPD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Gracicles sadly the NHS does support routine monitoring for T2D (well it's complicated), you can ask GP but you'll be lucky if they agree.

    If you want to self fund like many do look at SD Codefree machine - you need to look at cost of strips going forward, this has cheapest. They is a section in the forum about which machine to buy.
     
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  10. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    It doesn't do a great deal ... in fact, less than that IMHO. Exercise, weight loss and good diet will do WAY more than metformin. My experience anyway.
     
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  11. Gracicles

    Gracicles Type 2 · Member

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    Great thank you
     
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  12. AtkinsMo

    AtkinsMo Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I really feel that you would be doing yourself a HUGE favour to take your diet and exercise seriously, it's not too late to start now! You could seriously watch your carbs and start the Metformin, or you could delay the metformin and see how you feel after lowering your carbs to 25 g a day. There are so many inspirational stories on here, indulge yourself in taking half a day to read up many people's successes to see if you can find some inspiration. all the evidence seems to show that type 2s who do not adjust their diet do indeed have an 'irreversible and progressive disease', with poor outcomes in the long term. It is usually possible to achieve non diabetic numbers with carb restriction alone - you have nothing to lose and everything to gain. If you have no idea how to start, just ask here, dozens of people will share their experience with you, you are in the right place!
     
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  13. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Hi,

    It is the cost of strips that we must be careful of. Many firms give meters away for free then charge exorbitant prices for the strips, The Codefree is about the cheapest.

    Try here for the Codefree meter
    http://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/blood-glucose-monitor/

    and here for the extra strips
    http://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/sd-codefree-test-strips-to-be-used-only-with-the-sd-monitor/

    Pharmacies don't sell them. There are discount codes if you buy in bulk
    5 packs 264086
    10 packs 975833

    I was diagnosed with an HbA1c of 53 and Metformin was never mentioned, but I have since discovered my own Practice prescribes it for HbA1cs above 53, but no-one forces you to take it. It's your decision to try diet only for a few months. As said above, Metformin helps only to a limited extent by reducing the amount of natural glucose our livers produce in times of fasting, exercise, stress etc. when it thinks we need a burst of energy. It is mainly an appetite suppressant, so will help the overweight more than than others. The fewer carbs you consume, the lower your blood sugars should hopefully become, so diet is the key, not tablets. It is a safe drug, however. The decision is yours!
     
  14. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed with an HbA1c of 46 and at my first 3 month HbA1c last month it was 42 so I was really pleased with that.
    I am taking 500mg twice a day of the SR Metformin because it is said it is a good drug for the positive properties it has on the body like protecting the heart I agree with the others it does not do much to lower BG levels diet is more effective for that
     
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  15. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    I had to ask for Metformin. My HbA1c was 49. I would love to still take it because it helped reduce my insulin resistance but My GP won't prescribe it at HbA1c under 48.
     
  16. Gracicles

    Gracicles Type 2 · Member

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    It's odd because my GP said he would prescribe it for people with a Hba1c of 43 or above if they are over weight too. x
     
  17. DominicLaiYew

    DominicLaiYew Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi,
    i was diagnosed with T2 at a FBG reading of 18mmol/L in Jan this year. With Mets ( 500x2) & intensive exercise & a low carb diet , i managed to bring this down to close to 6-7 consistently on most days, unless i "give myself a break & binge eat".
    I like to know your success on how you brought down your BG without Mets, i tried for a week, but my sugar levels shot up a couple of points;
    & being discipline all the time is driving me fatigue as well.
    Help!
     
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  18. Tenzarin

    Tenzarin Type 2 · Member

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    My HbA1c was 88 when I was put on metformin in June 2015, at a dosage of 1x500mg SR per day.

    My last two HbA1c checks in December and March were 35 and 38 - however, I've also switched to an LCHF diet, so it's hard to tell which has had the most impact.

    I do know that metformin helps to keep my average BG for the day down: I tried diet-only in January and the average went up to the 7-8 mmol/L range. I started taking metformin again in Feb & it's back between 5-6 mmol/L.

    Personally, I'm quite happy to stay on my current dosage indefinitely.
     
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  19. Gracicles

    Gracicles Type 2 · Member

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    Hi, I am on 500mg of metformin, I was meant to have up'd it to 1500mg by now but I find my sugar is only high after breakfast so I only take it then. The reason for this I think is because my breakfast is fairly carb heavy usually (porridge made with milk with fresh blue berries and raspberries and a bit of stevia).
    The rest of the time I don't really eat any carbs. Well other than what is in fruit and veg. I don't eat bread, pasta, potatoes, rice pastry, biscuits, chocolate or sweets. I can't quite get round to having my couple of coffees a day with no sugar but in the last couple of days i have lowered it to half a teaspoon instead of 1.
    I test my blood at home occasionally and since starting to eat like this about 3 weeks ago it's been fine, always below 8.
    I have also lost around 11lbs in those 3 weeks too
     
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  20. amgrundy

    amgrundy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Gracicles, I was put on Metformin in Jan this year 2 daily x 500mg with a reading of 19.3 now down in low single figures.. I do not eat rice / pasta / potatoes / only eat burgen linseed and Soya bread or lidl high protein rolls. As for the metformin I thought the tablets were to lower BG levels too but reading all the advice and messages on this site I now tend to believe thet they are a diet suppressant. What ever they do I am quite satisfied taking them until my doctor says I can come off them, welcome to this forum. Try going on the forum " What Have You Eaten Today " some good food ideas on there. Good luck :):)
     
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