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What's you're fave diabetes friendly breakfast?

Discussion in 'Food, Nutrition and Recipes' started by FinnulaC, Jun 16, 2017.

  1. FinnulaC

    FinnulaC Type 1 · Member

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    So! Have just been diagnosed with t1, like yesterday, they had thought I was t2, I had booked a flight to America, I am meant to be on the plane now...but it has been stopped by the 'in the nick of time' diagnosis.
    Anyway, I am just looking for sympathy for the above essentially, but more importantly what do Ye all suggest for breakfast,? I'm having trouble, I had thought porridge was ok, as I read that online (goddammit) but just checked my bgl and it ain't...help appreciated as in the morning I just don't wanna think. . .

    Love and wondering
    Finnula.

    *oh and I am literally heading out the door to see my diabetic nurse to start on insulin, so wish me luck guys.

    Xx
     
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  2. Ann1982

    Ann1982 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'll tag @daisy1 for you who will help with useful info. But for breakfasts try eggs, scrambled boiled or fried. Greek yogurt and a few berries. You should have a look at the low carb diet on this forum. Plenty of ideas and helpful suggestions. Sorry ou had to miss your holiday but better safe than sorry. There will be other holidays. Take care of yourself.
     
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  3. db89

    db89 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @FinnulaC you will need insulin to avoid a raise in blood glucose from something like porridge. It doesn't mean that you can't have it or it isn't suitable but without insulin you have nothing to combat the rise from the carbs at the moment. Your DSN should explain what to take to start with so good luck at your appointment.

    You may find you need to take insulin in advance of a meal like breakfast (I certainly do!) to avoid a rise but you will find this out as you learn what you need to take and how your body reacts to insulin etc.
     
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  4. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Expert
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    I generally have egg scambled with butter and black pepper and a side serving of mushrooms, or full fat yogurt with blueberries and walnuts. Coffee with cream. At weekends full cooked breakfast of fried egg, bacon, sausage and mushrooms.
     
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  5. Kristin251

    Kristin251 LADA · Expert

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    Avocado is my everyday breakfast. I eat it with celery. I can't have any carbs at bf or I rise ridiculous even with insulin.

    Sorry to hear of your unfortunate news. I was there 3 years ago. It can be a challenge in the beginning but you'll settle in. Just test often.
     
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  6. dancer

    dancer Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Porridge with berries (blueberries and/or strawberries or raspberries) is my favourite breakfast. While using Novorapid, my test results 2 hours after eating were poor. I recently changed to the faster acting Fiasp insulin and my post breakfast results have improved.
    Everyone is different. Some Type 1s have no problem with porridge, while others can't eat it without spiking.

    It will take you a while to be stabilised on insulin. I'm sure your DSN will give you loads of advice but if you do need any extra help, just ask and we'll be here to try and answer your questions.
     
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  7. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Do try porridge again when you start on insulin, just avoid the instant type such as Ready Brek and opt for Steel-Cut/Jumbo Oats instead.

    I eat porridge for breakfast around 5 days a week, adding Greek Yogurt, Seeds & Blueberries to the mix, the added fat helps dampen down any spikes but I also bolus 20mins before eating.

    If you find porridge is a No No then maybe have eggs instead, something like boiled eggs & toast, poached eggs on toast or a cheese omelette, just like oats eggs are nutritious and quite filling.
     
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  8. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @FinnulaC . It's still early days for you, so much to learn. Try not to figure diabetes all in one go. I'm 27 yrs in and still have times when I learn something new. Learn a little and often.
    One bit of advice I'll offer is.......... you control your diabetes DO NOT let it control you.
    With this in mind breakfast becomes easy. Eat the breakfast you want and inject insulin accordingly DO NOT alter your diet because you're suddenly T1. This approach to diabetes is in my opinion is essential.
    Obviously it's not that easy but with the mantra of being in charge and living life your way I believe is the way to go.
    As I said you have so much to learn, honeymoon period, bolusing, basal test, ketones, hypos, carb counting, the list goes on but all these things will come in due time and when they do we will all be here to help and advise you if needed.
    For now have breakfast you want along with suggested insulin dose and test your sugars to see how they change after eating, keep a record of everything and at this point in time let your DSN advise you.
    A few weeks or even months of erratic BS readings is not going to be the end of the world ( my opinion only )
    If you find that your BS readings are out of control then speak to your DSN.
    YOU ARE THE BOSS, not the diabetes. I along with others eat porridge on a regular basis.
    Good luck.
     
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  9. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Let us know your insulin regime, how often, how adjustable, the type of insulin...

    The reason being that different insulin regimes allow different amounts of flexibility, and it may mean that (certainly to start with) some breakfast choices are easier than others.

    Hope the transition to insulin goes well! Let us know how you get on?
     
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  10. FinnulaC

    FinnulaC Type 1 · Member

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    Ooo @pip thank you!

    (Also I am new here does the @sign work to tag u guys? And I get no notifications so have to search for replies etc.
     
  11. FinnulaC

    FinnulaC Type 1 · Member

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    THANK YOU!
    It went well with the nurse, first time administering insulin!!
    Feeling weird but ok...
     
  12. FinnulaC

    FinnulaC Type 1 · Member

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    I had no idea fat can help, I imagine it's good fat? Which is the type in yogurts?
    Xxxx
     
  13. FinnulaC

    FinnulaC Type 1 · Member

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    I had no idea fat can help, I imagine it's good fat? Which is the type in yogurts?
    Xxxx
     
  14. FinnulaC

    FinnulaC Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you so much.
    I did have a problem with alcohol so have given that and smoking up happily and I imagine it's not a good idea to have massive amounts of chocolate cake...?
     
  15. FinnulaC

    FinnulaC Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you @Brunneria!
    Injected for the first time!!! Was very weird, but felt good to be learning how to help myself. I am seeing the main DSN on Wednesday to gauge how much insulin I should have, I am quite active and eating well, so have lowered my bgl, so am on a low dose atm, but we will see, they have to find out how the pancreas is doing.
    I know so little atm...but slowly learning.
    Xx
     
  16. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Moderation!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! No harm in a piece of chocolate cake once a week. To quit smoking and alcohol ain't easy, chocolate cake will be a pushover :):):)
     
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  17. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @FinnulaC

    Hello Finnulac and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask more questions and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  18. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    I have omelettes for breakfast with different fillings mixed in such as cheese, mushrooms, sliced black olives, diced up bacon or cold meats. I have even used chopped up mixed veggies in them as well.
     
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  19. petepontiac

    petepontiac Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Weetabix and blue berries every morning.
     
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