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Why check your blood sugars every day?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Mothman, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. Mothman

    Mothman · Well-Known Member

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    My thoughts about this are that if you keep checking your bloods every day before/after/during each meal and before you go to bed and then when you get up next day or are about to go out or come in is going to make you paranoid about the problem?

    I know i am diabetic, ime trying to eat well, or as best i can. I know there is room for improvement in my diet and am slowly getting there. I have a non fasting test with the Docs on a 3 monthly basis and i only check myself once or twice a week, sometimes more [but not a lot] sometimes less but i am not consumed by the problem to the detriment of everything else. I have to get on with my life as best i can and i wont be hindered by diabetes if i can help it. Its something i have now to live with. If my bloods go up, then they [i hope] will go down too if i continue to do right by myself. I think taking them too often just stresses yourself out too much. I have a lot of interests, gardening, mills bombs, my citroen BXs and looking after my mum as her carer and my dogs and tend to forget to check myself regularly. The 3 monthly figures show ime slowly getting the better of things and anyway, as a gardener by trade, get enough sore fingers from thorns, cuts and scratches to worry about, let alone making them worse by jabbing myself 3 or 4 times a day.
    Managing so far by diet alone and am slowly, and i say slowly losing weight as its easier to maintain the loss this way.
    I say save your fingers pain.

    Andy
     
  2. didie

    didie · Well-Known Member

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    I check my fasting blood every morning and then again 2 hours after breakfast. It's been good for me to see my levels come as I've lost weight through diet and exercise. I look upon testing as giving me control and reinforcement of what I'm doing. I work on the theory that if my bloods are ok in the morning, then they'll be ok for the rest of the day. I don't consider myself hindered by diabetes at all. I consider myself to be in control and I'm actually now fitter than I have been for many years.
     
  3. AMBrennan

    AMBrennan · Well-Known Member

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    Since you didn't post in the T2 forum I'll comment on this*: Because I think that a correction now and the correct dose next time is better than "hoping" that BG comes down on it's own.

    * Note that some might consider your blatant disregard for those whose condition can't be managed by diet and exercise alone a bit unfortunate. Further, if you ask a question only relevant to T2s treated with diet and exercise alone then it might be a good idea to mention that somewhere in your post.

    Edit to add: What's more, many T2s managing their condition with diet and exercise don't even get test strips on prescription so maybe you should stop whining about sore fingers when others have to spend a lot of money on the tests you get for free (I assume that if you didn't then you wouldn't have made this thread)
     
  4. Mothman

    Mothman · Well-Known Member

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    Oh.ime sorry i stood on your toes.
    No need to be nasty, i wasnt intending any offence to anyone.

    Maybe you should come down off your high horse and chat with a reasonable attitude to people.
    My fingers hurt all the time with the job that i do but i dont moan about it.

    Andy
     
  5. Sue o2

    Sue o2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I test 7 times a day with the approval and encouragement of my doctor, i have much better control because of it, because of this and advice ive read on this forum ive managed to get my Hba1c down from double figures to 5.5 in a year, and had my medication reduced, Ive lost weight and feel much better and so much in control , i dont consider it a hardship to be pricking my fingers they dont hurt at all and look like normal fingers, and it hasnt taken over my life it is all in my routine.
    Sue
     
  6. Sarah69

    Sarah69 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree there is no need to be nasty! I have been told by my dsn I only need to test 4 times a day before meals. I think sometimes that's too many times. Obviously if you are out for the day that would be impossible! I get fed up with testing and having 4 injections a day but have accepted that I'll have diabetes for life and sometimes need to do the testing.
     
  7. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Andy, can I ask you what you are testing so often for? If you are tweaking your diet and making reductions in your carbohydrate intake to lower your bg after meals then you will not need to test so often for ever, just until you know what size portions you can eat of what foods in order to keep your bg under control. I only test a couple of times a week now but when I was gaining control and adjusting my diet I was testing 6 or 8 times a day.

    If you are just testing for testings sake, then you are wasting your time anyway and probably giving yourself unnecessary stress, so why bother.

    But I cant stress the importance of well controlled bg levels and the only way to get them is by testing every food in every portion size so you know what you can and cant eat. If you are unsure of how to test/adjust your diet just ask, there are no stupid questions :D
     
  8. Grazer

    Grazer · Well-Known Member

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    What is it with you? The only posts you ever make are critical of either something or some person. Andy raised a perfectly reasonable question. It's obvious that it doesn't apply to type 1s, but neither was it dismissive of them. Your answer was totally out of line.
    For what it's worth to more reasonable members of the forum, I think Sid is right. I followed the same path in terms of testing frequently initially to find out what I could and couldn't eat, and to establish a diet suitable for me, but now only test now and then when I either try something new or to ensure things aren't changing. For any people who, like AMBrennan, can neither read a profile nor make reasonable assumptions about a diabetics "type" from their post, I'm a T2 on diet only.
     
  9. viviennem

    viviennem Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Sid :D :wink: and Grazer.

    When I first got my meter I tested as recommended here, fasting, before and 2 hours after meals, and bed time. That told me what foods I can eat, and I don't need to test so much now.

    I usually test first thing - part of my getting up routine - but other than that I tend to test after new foods, after eating out or treats, and occasionally I'll do a couple of days full testing just to make sure everything's okay. My brother's coming up next week for a couple of nights, which means eating out and having 'treats' eg fish and chips, and I'll be testing then.

    Doing this I've got my HbA1c down from 6.5 to 5.2. I want to keep my blood glucose levels as close to non-diabetic as normal, and certainly within the NICE Type 2 targets. I'm managing this on my present regime.

    I shall continue to test because this is the only notification I will have of anything going wrong - three monthly intervals are too long, in my opinion, and the HbA1c is only an average - it doesn't catch huge spikes if they're short-lived, but those spikes add up in terms of damage.

    Also, my morning fasting test is a little reminder - I've got Type 2. If I don't test every day, my self control tends to slip a bit! :oops:

    Viv 8)
     
  10. Mothman

    Mothman · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys for your most helpful posts. I am certainly of the opinion that in my case i dont need to test particularly often, especially as ive given up crisps, my main weakness and am slowly loosing weight, not that ime am overweight. To loose it slowly is better than rapid loss as it goes on again very easily. I did test a lot when initially diagnosed, probably due to the shock of finding out but as it dosnt make me feel better i have decided to do it when i feel the need. The diet is much improved and i am getting the right results re an overall reduction in my blood sugars.

    i also think, looking at his other posts, this AMBrennan is just another forum troll and therefore i dont think we should take any more notice of his comments, i certainly wont.

    Thank you all, back to sawing up logs for me.

    Andy
     
  11. AMBrennan

    AMBrennan · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it was; I am simply tired of people using this forum to rationalise not following medical advice - the title is "Why check your blood sugars every day?", and at no point does the OP mention that he is on diet and exercise alone.
    The two likely scenarios are that he was asked by his GP to do daily blood tests and doesn't like it very much; given that most T2s on diet and exercise alone (and some on oral medication) don't even get prescriptions I find it hard to have sympathy for the OP.
    Alternatively, the OP might not have been asked by his GP to do daily blood tests but read about it somewhere (e.g. in the context of patients taking insulin), and now made this thread without properly researching the issue (e.g. that it doesn't apply to him).
     
  12. Mothman

    Mothman · Well-Known Member

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    Why are you tired of this forum, you havnt been here very long, only joined a few days before me in September?

    I would therefore suggest, if you are tired of it you go somewhere else. :lol:

    Andy
     
  13. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    original post:
    which is why as a T1 I didn't reply .
    ( probably could have given a similar answer to those who have answered, but my answer would be from reading, theirs through experience )
     
  14. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

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    If you need to test every day and/or how many times a day is really dependant on you actual control and medication you are on..

    For T2's it's very helpful to do full testing regime daily while they sorting out their control, what works for them once this has been achieved then a good routine of weekly testing, with extra testing being done when they are ill or changing routine or trying new foods etc.. Should keep an eye of things, ensure they are maintaining control and also pick up any pending problems..

    In general there shouldn't be pain involved or sore fingers from testing, if you are experiencing this it maybe that your finger depth needs adusting, different make of finger pricker or just ensuring you use a fresh lancet every time can sort this out..

    I'm T1 and use a pump, and I test between 6-12 times a day, depending what I'm doing and I don't suffer from sore fingers and I've been testing for over 20+ years, mind you when BG became available, the lancets where like razor blades in shape, and they shredded your fingers, daily routine testing did hurt and left your fingers feeling sore :shock:
     
  15. Unbeliever

    Unbeliever · Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone had their blood sugar tested at the hospital recently before an operation maybe and not in the Diabetes clinic?

    It is quite amusing especially for those of us used to self -esting. They ask you if you are left or right handed, which finger are you least likely o use and when they have completed the est seem to want to put a dressing on the wound! All well meant I know bu still quite funny if you are used to esting yourself several times a day.
     
  16. Unbeliever

    Unbeliever · Well-Known Member

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    Well exactly. This however, obviously wasn't as apparent to the poster as it is to you.
    You obviously have a very logical mind but many people are confused , they DON't get adequate
    advice and are afraid to ask. they try to find the answers elsewhere and sometimes become more confused- so they come her and o similar places for clarificaion.

    If only it were a case of merely following medical advice. If the HCP's can't agree or deliver the advice in a way which the lay person can understand, if the advice is inconsistent or out of date or sometimes just plain WRONG what is tthe patient to do. especially now that people are not encouraged to take responsibility for their own health.. "Just leave it to us< come for your annual review and leave i all to us".

    Many of us are sick and initially shocked by the diagnosis- takes a while to sort it out and start to think logically.
    You have been very fortunate if you have not experienced hese problems but perhaps you still need some support or just to discuss the subject? it can be very isolating if one doesn't know any other diabetics.
     
  17. Mothman

    Mothman · Well-Known Member

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    I will always test myself on my right hand because i am right handed. This, you might think is a bit odd as i therefore use my right hand the most.
    It because i am right handed i use my tools [ime a gardener] such a trowels and secateurs in my right hand but use my left hand for weeding and generally getting it dirty when on my knees sorting someones flower bed.This i hope slows down the chances of me getting infections in my hand from all the pricks etc. If you think about it, when kneeling weeding, you will support yourself with your right hand[if right handed] and use your left hand to weed. This is the way i do it anyway, hope it works for you.
    Andy
     
  18. gollymax

    gollymax · Well-Known Member

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    Hi
    I have just read your comments on why check your blood sugars every day?
    My answer to this is , I test my blood up to 10 times per day, I do not have any serious complications yet, I have 6 children and 11 grand children.
    If I did not check my BG levels like I do may be I would have none of the above.
    I have been a type 1 diabetic for 50 years
     
  19. Grazer

    Grazer · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Gollymax, obviously it's different for you as type 1. Andy was posting as a new type 2, and I'm sure wasn't aiming his comments at people like yourself. We picked up on that earlier.
    Good luck and carry on enjoying those grandkids!
     
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