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Why won't the NHS tell you the secret to treating diabetes?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by hyponilla, Nov 22, 2020.

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  1. hyponilla

    hyponilla Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I didn't see it on here, so thought I'd share this interesting article by Michael Mosley. It's funny because I remember reading an interview with one of the doctors who cracked stomach ulcers, and he said that if you wanted a noble price in physiology you should find a condition that doctors blame on stress and find the actual cause for it.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/...Y-wont-NHS-tell-secret-treating-diabetes.html
     
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  2. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Whilst I agree that, for T2 diabetics, losing weight can be a factor in treating diabetes and it does work for some by far the most important factors, IMHO, is testing - something which the NHS does not advocate for the majority of T2s and a low carb diet.
     
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  3. First.Officer

    First.Officer Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    "Why won't the NHS tell you the secret to treating diabetes?"
    Because it takes an age for them to catch up, do so many trials (that would absolve the NHS of any blame should someone die) and because its not in the interest of drug companies to have a 'cure' that would require little to no, medical intervention.
     
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  4. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    And not all T2s are overweight....
     
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  5. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Sigh.. Mosley bigging himself up yet again.
    The man hasn't had an original idea in his life just piggy backs other people's efforts.
     
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  6. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    Not a word about carbs and reducing them... Mosley won't tell you the secret to treating T2 either.
     
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  7. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    First, ignore Mosely as he's only interested in selling books and is too much in love with the Newcastle Diet. The NHS is advised on diet by a PHE quango called SACN. They use university funded research and guess who funds most of that research? The food industry who want to sell us highly profitable carbs. The result was the 'Eat(un)well Plate'. You couldn't make it up but no one should assume the NHS is free of business influence or politics. Sadly most of the health organisations/charities take their lead from PHE as well.
     
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  8. hyponilla

    hyponilla Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I didn't know Mosley was so unpopular. The way I see him is as a strong advocate for fasting after he made that documentary Eat, Fast and Live Longer. Didn't think of him as a media ***** that's just looking to sell books, but then I'm a bit biased because I do find him quite handsome :) Also in no way did I mean to post something that says all type 2's should lose weight (sorry if I upset anyone), I just found it interesting that in the same way the low carb diet is being ignored largely by the medical community to treat diabetes the scientists who found the link between bacteria and stomach ulcers were not taken seriously for years.
     
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  9. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

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    Well you didn't offend me and whilst I am not Moseley's greatest fan, there was nothing wrong with your post.

    You are right of course, mainstream medicine is slow to catch on to new ways of thinking.
     
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  10. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Money.
     
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  11. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    He has a reputation (backed up by reality) for jumping on the latest band waggon, chucking out a book and then disappearing off into the distance. He piggybacks off the hard work of others and tries to cash in.
    In his early days of "Trust me I'm a doctor" he had some interesting observations but not any more.
    No-one was offended (or at least I certainly wasn't) so please don't take umbrage..
    I did meet him once at a PHC conference and wasn't impressed.. bit weaselly (and not the Ron kind).
     
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  12. Tannith

    Tannith · BANNED

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    “When fat cannot be safely stored under the skin, it is then stored inside the liver, and over-spills to the rest of the body including the pancreas. This ‘clogs up’ the pancreas, switching off the genes which direct how insulin should effectively be produced, and this causes type 2 diabetes.”

    The findings have been recently published in the academic journal Cell Metabolism.

    Professor Taylor added: “This means we can now see type 2 diabetes as a simple condition where the individual has accumulated more fat than they can cope with.

    “Importantly this means that through diet and persistence, patients are able to lose the fat and potentially reverse their diabetes. The sooner this is done after diagnosis, the more likely it is that remission can be achieved.

    This is the reason I think that weight loss should be the first go-to solution tried for T2 ie it has the best chance of working in the first 4-6 years after diagnosis, before the beta cells have become irrevocably damaged. I think the time to try managing the condition with low carb or drugs is after remission by healing the beta cells has been tried and failed.
     
  13. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    So for those not drastically overweight and who went low carb or keto on diagnosis at moderate hb1ac levels (suggesting they were not undiagnosed too long) and who have lost weight yet remain stubbornly above normal levels what’s the answer? There a few of us around in here. There are certainly those for whom weight loss alone does make huge differences though I agree.

    Perhaps type 2 is actually type 2a,2b,2c,2d etc etc Ie not all caused by the same mechanism and thus not all resolved by the same methods.
     
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  14. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Was this the heliocobacter pylori bacteria? Because I have had this!

    Stay safe
     
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  15. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Except that of course low carb assists greatly with weight loss too so the starvation of the ND of which you are so fond is unnecessary. As we all know it's hard to maintain significant weight loss if it has been achieved through starvation which is exactly what the "biggest Loser" study showed.
    This is precisely why "crash dieting" is considered bad.
    If you have managed significant weight loss and maintained it over a long period using the ND methods than you are one of very few so well done!
     
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  16. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

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    Exactly. I have followed very low calorie diets for years. I lost weight, but never enough. I got ill and had to eat more, resulting in weight gain.
    If only someone had told me that carbs were the problem.
     
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  17. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Every single acquaintance I’ve ever known who lost a ton of weight through calorie restriction was gigantic again the next time I saw them. Not scientific but just saying.
     
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  18. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've been borderline underweight most of my life, and on diagnosis my ophthalmologist opined that I'd likely been undiagnosed for a minimum of ten years. It's about the personal fat threshold rather than actual obesity. As you'll know already, some folk just don't get fat which, counterintuitively, puts them at greater risk of type 2 diabetes.

    I wasn't in a position to lose any weight but I managed to fix my diabetes by eliminating glucose, fructose and seed oils with extreme prejudice 24/7 irrespective of what my meter ever told me about the food I'd eaten. After about a year of this I'd battered my diabetes into remission, where it remains indefinitely. Luckily for me I prefer the food I eat now more than I ever did a grain & fruit based diet, but I fully appreciate others are not so fortunate.

    TLDR; weight gain is just another symptom of metabolic dysfunction and shouldn't be thought of as the cause. TOFI like myself are definitely an uncomfortable paradox for those who push the obesity equals diabetes paradigm.
     
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    #18 Jim Lahey, Nov 22, 2020 at 6:39 PM
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2020
  19. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Michael Mosley: I'll pass on him... An Original Snake Oil merchant.

    NHS: been controlled by the Tories for so long it's hardly independant, if it ever was, and so vested interests make change very difficult. Money - jobs for chums and doners.
     
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  20. Redshank

    Redshank Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    The original work by Professor Taylor was all carried out on people who were significantly overweight (average weight over 100kg averageBMI over 38)
    The results from this group have then been extrapolated for all people with type 2 diabetes. An assumption has been made that the issues are the same for those who are not overweight. The personal fat threshold sounds plausible but as far as I can see is not yet backed up by hard data.
    I believe that a study was going to be done with people not overweight, but I suspect it has been held up by Covid restrictions. It will be interesting to see the results.
     
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