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Wich one?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Wojo38, Aug 16, 2019.

  1. Wojo38

    Wojo38 · Member

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    Hello
    We started to read labels on a products and I am not sure how to understand it,example:
    1 Zero sugar hard sweet:
    Carbohydrate 2.8 g per sweete
    Of wich sugars 0.1g
    Do I look on a products to have low carbohydrate or sugars ?
    I understand they are the same family?
    This two numbers are always diffrent from each other on a product,and carbohydrate is always higher.
    What would you consider a low sugars on a product?everything below 1g per 100 ml?what is high sugars on a product?
    Thank you:)
     
  2. lessci

    lessci Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Unless they're sugar alcohols (often listed as polyols) which we can't digest (these are the sweetners which can cause "Gastric distress" if we eat to much), but can sometimes provoke a high BG in some people
     
  3. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello, We look at "which of carbohydrates" on labels and be careful of sugar free or low sugar foods, we encourage diabetics not to eat them because of the side effects and some sweeteners make some diabetics experience high blood sugars. Stevia seems like a good sweetener if you want a bit of sweetness in tea or coffee or dessert. I'd say anything below 10g per 100g or 100ml is low carb? I think others might say something different.
     
  4. Wojo38

    Wojo38 · Member

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    Thanks
    Lets forget about sugar free,just like normal food,we look on sugars then?
     
  5. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You need to look at the carb value (ie ignore the 'of which sugars'), remembering of course that some will show per 100g, some will show by portion size, some show by cooked weights (my personal bugbear), some by uncooked weights so some maths may be involved.
     
  6. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sugar is just a simple carbohydrate. As its a simpler molecule its broken down and absorbed in the body quicker than a complex carb, which can take longer. Hence carb count is always higher, because it includes the 'of which sugars'.

    In general if something has high 'of which sugars' then it will raise your glucose levels quick. I try and stay on the lower end of the carb scale as well per 100g of food for example.

    Low and high sugars really depends on each person and what type of diabetes they have. For a type 2, 10g/100g of carbs may not raise their levels much over a period of time, but 10g/100g 'of which sugars' may well spike their levels.

    Similarly for a type 1, insulin generally cant act fast enough to cover spikes from pure sugar etc., so we have to pre-bolus or avoid those foods.
     
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  7. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You look at which of carbohydrates, the sugars as everyone is saying is a carb which breaks down much quicker and raises blood glucose quicker - this is useful for type 1 diabetics who need a hypo treatment.
     
  8. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    It's always the carbs you want to look at, no matter the food type. The "of which sugars" is kind of useless, as all carbs turn to glucose, not just sugars, but the starches too. To start out with, they shouldn't be more than 5 grams per 100 grams of product, to keep it relatively simple. Once you get the hang of it, you can carb-count a little more extensively, but for now, do yourself a favour and keep it simple. 5 per 100 grams is okay to start with.
     
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  9. Wojo38

    Wojo38 · Member

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    Ok so if product says "carbohydrate of wich sugars"-that means it will rise level high quickly, doesent mathers how much is the number there,obviously not to high?so if product says carbohydrate 20g per 100g is it a lot?becouse the numbers of carbohydrates are quiet high on a products, no idea wich numbers are acceptable
    Thank you
     
  10. Wojo38

    Wojo38 · Member

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    Ok thank you,sound good for me:)
     
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  11. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    It is the carbohydrate - the of which sugars is pretty much irrelevant for such things as sweets or anything which has no fiber, carbohydrate is digested very rapidly, in my experience.
     
  12. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    As others have said:-

    As a type 2 (please fill in your profile to show what type you are as it effects the advice offered) just look at the carbs number (ignore the “of which sugars” and any sugar free banners). If you are eating a tiny amount of the product then you might consider something at 20g/100. But otherwise I stick to less than 5g per 100 mostly, and carefully consider what it is and how much I’ll eat for stuff up to 100g

    Another way to do this is to add up the carbs you eat each meal/ each day. There are app’s and books to help you do this. A lot of us eat less than 30g a day. Most would probably be under 100g and some manage to get good numbers under 150g. Plenty of people eating whatever they like could be eating 100’s a day currently.
     
  13. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    We did mention you can weigh your food with food scales and then your family and your husband can judge whether or not it is worth eating. If I weighed 100g of noodles, it might be a tiny portion, but 100g of meat or vegetables is a lot more.
    I know from experience that 100g of white rice is barely anything, so I rather not eat it and eat something else. Same with cereal, at 30g-40g of cereal is very very little.

    We also mentioned that you can document your food or keep a food diary of what you eat. Don't look at sugars, just look at carbs because carbs will turn into sugar. But when something is high in sugar like candy, it is just pure sugar and raises blood readings very quickly.
    Also you can set a limit for your husband, usually under 130g carbs per day is low carb. Under 20g is keto? Everyone is different, so keep testing and record it. Some people manage well at moderate carb around 150g per day. But from your previous posts, your husband needs to get his numbers down gradually, so low carb might be a motivating and a good starting point to get the ball rolling.
     
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