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Worried about my children having diabetes

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Mrsrobbieswan, Nov 18, 2017.

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  1. Mrsrobbieswan

    Mrsrobbieswan Family member · Well-Known Member

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    I worry constantly that my children will develop diabetes. I am even getting to the stage there is no sweets or chocolate in the house, and when they ask where it is, I tell them I forgot to shop for it. We had homemade burgers for tea last night and it went down really well, but I worry that with all the healthy eating in the world, will they still be affected by it?.
     
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  2. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Your husband has type 1. Developing type 1 diabetes has nothing to do with what you eat. It is the result of the immune system killing off the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. No one knows why this happens.

    Has your husband hand antibody testing to confirm his type 1 diagnosis?

    Children of men with type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 1 themselves. The risk of developing type 1 for the general population is 1 in 100. The risk for children of men with type 1 is 1 in 10. Healthy eating will have no impact whatsoever on that risk.

    If you're concerned about your children's risk of developing type 1 you can have them tested for antibodies with trialnet - http://www.bristol.ac.uk/media-library/sites/clinical-sciences/migrated/documents/factsheet.pdf
     
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  3. Mrsrobbieswan

    Mrsrobbieswan Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @catapillar . Yes, he did have the antibody testing. As the causes of why the pancreas stops working is unknown, as you rightly say, all I can do is to promote a healthy lifestyle for myself and my family in the hope that it will prevent it. What else can I do?
     
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  4. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    So was he antibody positive then?

    As mentioned, you can pursue trialnet testing to have your kids tested for antibodies and better assess their risk of type 1.

    Obviously being healthy / healthy eating is great, generally. It doesn't do anything to prevent type 1 - no one know what causes type 1, so there is nothing that can be done to reduce the risk.
     
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  5. Mrsrobbieswan

    Mrsrobbieswan Family member · Well-Known Member

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    The problem with the antibody test was that he was already on insulin as it was assumed type 2. That was the reason of the control period to see exactly how his body was coping. Beyond that I'm afraid I don't understand much of the science.
     
  6. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Mrsrobbieswan please don't worry about the Robbiecygnets in this way. As @catapillar points out, there is nothing you can do to prevent the already unlikely possibility of them developing type 1.

    If in the unlikely event they were to develop it, they will be fortunate in that they would have the excellent first-hand experience of @Robbieswan to draw on. But please don't let these worries take over.

    To put this into context I have no immediate family history of type 1 diabetes, but I have had it since I was 11. Two of my father's cousins have it, but nobody closer than that.

    You've got a fabulous family, and diabetes has become an unfortunately unwelcome recent member of it. But please don't worry about your children. It might happen, but it probably won't.

    Big big hugs. Have a lovely weekend, all of you.

    Love Snapsy
    :)
     
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  7. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Being on insulin has absolutely no impact on the validity or accuracy of an antibody test. There is literally no interaction between the use of exogenous insulin and the presence, or otherwise, of antibodies. 99% of type 1s tested for antibodies will have been on insulin at the time of the test. Perhaps the control was for other reasons than to allow the antibody testing.
     
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  8. Mrsrobbieswan

    Mrsrobbieswan Family member · Well-Known Member

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    How weird, we were told that it would affect it, but I am in no position to say either way. I really don't understand the science.
     
  9. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Rationing sweets and chocolate is probably no bad thing. Genetics may or may not play a bigger part of the question and that's not straight forward.

    "Unlike some traits, diabetes does not seem to be inherited in a simple pattern. Yet clearly, some people are born more likely to develop diabetes than others." - American Diabetes Association

    Even twins who you'd think would inherit the same risk factors may have different outcomes, just through environmental factors required to switch a particular gene "ON". Try not to worry too much, there's an awful lot we have no control over, as I mentioned rationing the sweeties is no bad thing.
     
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  10. barb1

    barb1 · Active Member

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    My philosophy is never to worry about something I can do nothing to change. Enjoy your kids, a better lifestyle will do no harm, but you worrying could adversely affect your wellbeing. Hugs
     
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  11. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Agree with @catapillar all the way to the "bank" on this one..

    From a personal perspective, being diagnosed as an 7/8 year old in 1976. (8th birthday.) I was brought up in a village in the West Country on a diet of locally sourced produce. (My dad was also growing his own!)
    Sweets? Snacks? (Apart from nuts in the house.) where a very rare treat.
    Lol, in short my father felt "takeaways" was sort of deviant...! (Along with using ATMs, he preferred to wait for the bank to open to get his cash.)

    Ironically, my dad (a slim, active & still working.) became T2, prescribed metformin in his mid to late 60s...?

    As far as I know, I have no other family members that are D. Though, it was mentioned about an aunt on my dad's side with "a touch of it." (Whatever that means......?!)
     
  12. Wowsap18482

    Wowsap18482 · Member

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    If you're worried about your children developing type 1 diabetes you can't do anything to prevent it. Your children's diets won't make them get type 1 diabetes
     
  13. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Worrying about oir children is a never ending job. Mine are all adults and I am a grandma but I still worry just as much. More perhaps, because now I worry about grandchildren as well!

    I have done a bit of scampering around my family tree and found some interesting things. Both my mum and dad came from large estended families so have a lot to look at.
    No diabetes of any sort on dads side. Some huge women, but no diabetes.

    Mums side, different story. Td1, td2, ms, hypothyroidism and other autoimmune nasties by the bucketful. I have developed a few myself as has my brother and nearly all of our cousins. So I worry about the children quite a bit.

    BUT. I am forewarned. I know what to look for. I am an example to my kids. I can support ( in a small way) ongoing research and keep up with latest thinking.

    Worrying is just part of being a parent. But make it work for you. There is nothing ,yet, to be done about our genetic disposition, but there is a lot to be done to make sure your children are as well prepared as possible. And you are already doing it!

    So, absolutely nothing to say in order to stop you worrying, but at least you know you are not alone.xxxx
     
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  14. Glenmac

    Glenmac Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Kentoldlady1.Worrying comes with a mums job spec.One set of three grand children 21, and a set of 17 year old twins,have an aunt with T1D on their mothers side and me ,granny on their dads side a T2D.My lovely daughter in law worries (naturally) about the boys inheriting diabetes.so far all ok.Shes quite firm on the fizzy drinks front,and always aims for healthy home cooked food.As she works,my son shares the cooking.The grandsons can all cook a healthy meal from scratch if necessary.One really enjoys cooking(and eating!!)The family are all quite trim as they are into various sports......it's not easy being a mum.You can only do your best.Enjoy your family( and the occasional take away for a treat)

    Edited to add,myDILs sister T1D,has trained and worked as a nurse and has a masters degree.I really admire her.She also has two boys in their20s who are diabetes free.Im sure that there are many stories like mine.x
     
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    #14 Glenmac, Nov 18, 2017 at 11:03 AM
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2017
  15. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I doubt it would prevent it but it’ll make them healthier. I know it’s hit you all dramatically hard but T1 isn’t a death sentence! Or a passport to endless limitations! We all have periods when we’re sick of it but I have to say as a not-so-golden oldie (I was always the one who was more of a rebellious peasant) I’m watching my friends begin to get a lot of things that make T1 seem the better condition to have.
    If it happens, it happens - and the tests might put your mind at rest about whether it’s likely to. Xx
     
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  16. Grateful

    Grateful Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The answers, especially the excellent explanations given by @catapillar, accord with everything I have read about the causation or heredity of Type 1 diabetes. I agree that there is nothing @Mrsrobbieswan can change. Generally encouraging a healthy diet does makes sense, but not because it will change the chances of getting T1-- just because it's a good thing in its own right.

    For what it's worth, and this is a totally different story because I have T2D: After diagnosis I waited several months to find out whether I would be able to control it through diet alone (and said nothing to my family, except my wife). When I did get the disease under control, I contacted my two adult daughters and did inform them that there is some evidence of a somewhat increased risk of T2D among the children of people with T2D (although the figures I have seen do not see a large effect, and I told them that). I also pointed out that an awful lot of people get T2D nowadays, so heredity was just one of many factors and quite likely not the main one!

    My two daughters reacted a bit differently.

    The elder, who is an expert cook, baker and chocolate-lover (and thin, as of now) sort of shrugged her shoulders but did start worrying a bit about her partner, who is sedentary and has been putting on weight (partly because of the delicious output from the kitchen).

    The younger, who is very thin and probably underweight on the BMI scale (like I was at her age) had a more extreme reaction and started to (somewhat) reduce carbs in her diet. I think she over-reacted but I suppose if she adjusts her diet to be rather less carb-heavy (and, like most modern young adults, it was carb-heavy), it won't do any harm and might do some good.

    I think I told them that their risk of developing T2D sometime in life had increased 15% because they have a dad with T2D (based on one of the first statistics I came across). I would be interested to see if any forum members have a better "take" on this. I do not consider this increased risk to be a "big deal" considering the current epidemic of T2D; heredity is pretty much swamped by other factors, probably.
     
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    #16 Grateful, Nov 18, 2017 at 1:03 PM
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2017
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