Chronic kidney disease increases risk in diabetes patients

Fri, 24 Feb 2012
A new study from the United States has claimed that patients suffering from type 2 diabetes are at twice the risk of dying from chronic kidney disease than people who don't have the condition.

The research, by a team from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and published in the Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, involved the analysis of around 20 controlled trials of diabetic patients, showing that the highest mortality rates were for those associated with patients with renal disease.

The randomised trials of at least 1,000 patients with type 2 diabetes, explored the links between specific inclusion and exclusion criteria and all-cause mortality. For the trials with patients that had elevated serum creatinine or impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate, it was found that mortality rates were between 5.9 and 8.2 per 100 patient-years, while the other trials had rates of less than 3.3.

It was reported that "Risk stratification by evidence of kidney disease, determined by renal function or proteinuria, should be emphasized in diabetic subjects, given its major impact on morbidity and mortality."

With trials for factors such as smoking and cholesterol, the highest rates were found in the trials requiring the presence of chronic kidney disease, although the researchers did admit that the study was limited by such things as a lack of individual patient data and information on the effects of medication during the trials.
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