Scots with diabetes struggle to manage condition, NHS Scotland report

Jack Woodfield
Thu, 12 Nov 2015
Scots with diabetes struggle to manage condition, NHS Scotland report
People with diabetes in Scotland are struggling to manage their condition because they don't know how to, according to national charity Diabetes Scotland.

Diabetes Scotland reported that 42.6 per cent of type 2 diabetes patients exceeded blood glucose guidelines at a yearly check. These figures soared to 76.5 per cent for type 1 diabetes patients.

Having too high blood glucose levels can increase the risk of diabetes-related complications, and the charity believes these figures are due to diabetes education being so poor.

Diabetes Scotland has launched a campaign called Taking Control ahead of World Diabetes Day on Saturday 14 November, which highlights the benefits that diabetes education courses can have.

Jane-Claire Judson, national director of Diabetes Scotland, said: "Managing diabetes without adequate education is like getting behind the wheel of a Formula One car without instruction.

"Education can be the silver bullet. By attending a diabetes education course people feel empowered to take control, manage their condition with confidence and reduce their risk of developing avoidable complications, such as kidney disease, stroke and amputation."

NHS Scotland spends roughly £1 billion a year on diabetes, with 80 per cent spent treating avoidable complications. Judson added that the cost of preventing complications will continue to grow unless there is a commitment to providing diabetes education.

"We have launched our Taking Control campaign to highlight the importance and effectiveness of good-quality diabetes education, both in supporting people to manage their condition well and, in time, reducing the cost of diabetes for NHS Scotland," said Judson.

"We want to encourage everyone in Scotland who is living with diabetes to ask their healthcare professional to be enrolled in a diabetes education course.

"It is crucial that education is made available both at the point of diagnosis and beyond as the education needs of people already living with the condition can change over time."
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