Pancreatic cancer research to get 10 million pound funding boost

Benedict Jephcote
Fri, 24 Mar 2017
Pancreatic cancer research to get 10 million pound funding boost
Millions of pounds are to be invested into researching pancreatic cancer and improve life expectancy for the condition.

There is a diabetes link as diabetes can be a risk factor or a symptom of pancreatic cancer.

Cancer Research UK has donated £10 million to the PRECISION-Panc project, the latest research taking place in order to discover specific treatment for individual tumours faster.

Scientists at the University of Glasgow will be given £8 million to work on the project. Pancreatic cancer patients will be asked if they want to take part in the research.

Scientists will then look closely to identify and document the structure of the specific DNA, RNA or protein molecule of each individual cancer. The results will enable people to be offered specific trials tailored to their own circumstances.

Pancreatic cancer expert, Professor Andrew Biankin at the University of Glasgow, said: "It's essential that the most suitable treatment is identified quickly.

"It's important we offer all patients the opportunity to be part of research alongside their standard care."

Tumour samples will be taken from people who have just been diagnosed for the team at University of Glasgow to analyse. The findings will then be used to steer future clinical trial options.

Three trials led by the Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit at the Beaston West of Scotland Cancer Centre in Glasgow will take place as part of the project which is recruiting 658 people from all over the UK to take part.

Professor Biankin added: "PRECISION-Panc has been developed over the course of three years.

"I believe we're on the cusp of making some incredible advances which will provide therapeutic options to help people affected by this terrible disease."

Cancer Research UK's Victoria Steven said: "This ambitious project marks a new era for pancreatic cancer and puts Glasgow at the forefront of pancreatic cancer research."
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