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Initial Pump Referral

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by Dan87, Apr 3, 2017.

  1. Dan87

    Dan87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,

    I've had a referral by a consultant to the diabetic specialist nurse and have an initial appointment early next month to discuss insulin pump therapy.

    I'm hoping it all goes well and that I am approved for the pump, if I am, how long does it normally take to get funding and get the pump?

    Hopefully the fact we are just into a new financial year will go in my favour!

    Dan
     
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  2. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Wouldn't like to give you false hope Dan as the time it can take can vary, I waited about 3 months but I've seen others say it took as long as 6 months.

    Anyway good luck and hope you get approval.
     
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  3. Felly

    Felly Type 1 · Member

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    It took me 3 months to initially get on the pump from being referred for one.
     
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  4. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Moderator
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    I waited a total of 13 months from referral to pump start date.
    I am in wales and it is partly down to staffing issues in my CCG.

    hope you get yours quickly !!!!
     
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  5. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    July (approval from consultant) to August (funding approved) to October (pump start) in my case. But that July came after years of wanting, and 6 months after really being able to engage with my clinic specifically about pumping.

    Worth the wait, @Dan87 , although I hope it's not a long one, obv!

    :)
     
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  6. Type1Lad

    Type1Lad Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    it took me 3 and half years to fight for an insulin pump, when i got told I could go on a pump I started the next day.
     
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  7. Dan87

    Dan87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies. At least the process has started which could end with me getting one :)

    Was it important to really fight your case as to why you should get funding for one? If so, I'll potentially go with the argument that I have ups (sedentary desk job 8 hours a day) and the lows (playing football for 90 mins on a Sat, and for 60 mins 1-2 times midweek).

    On that note, can you take the pump off for 90 mins or is that too long?
     
  8. Type1Lad

    Type1Lad Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    When I started pump I was told to only disconnect for up to an hour. I had to explain why it would benefit me and they didn't think it would from the reasons I gave. My consultant now changes his mind and thinks it has benefited me.
     
  9. Type1Bri

    Type1Bri Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As with everything in diabetes, your diabetes may vary! I find that football will raise my blood sugars, something to do with adrenaline response, so 90 minute match with no insulin would result in very high sugars for me
     
  10. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Dan87 I don't do contact sports like football so I'm not sure how at risk is would be as a piece of hardware, but to be honest I wouldn't be keen to remove my pump - I'd want it tucked safely away of course, but doing its job of infusing insulin.

    The reason for this is that when I exercise (I run, cycle and swim) I need insulin to just not go sky high. I do lower my basal rate for during exercise to between 50% and 70% of full whack, depending on what I'm doing, but immediately after stopping (like, IMMEDIATELY) I set a basal rate of 130% to 150% or I'm in the teens for the rest of the day. That's the only way I find I don't go low during exercise and high after.

    To swim I remove my pump (about 40 mins, for swim, steam room and shower), but I always bolus half a unit half an hour before I swim, and raise my basal for a couple of hours afterwards, or I'd be high all day. I can maintain a straight line by doing this, but that's less time than 90 minutes.

    But as I say, I'm not sure quite how 'down and dirty' things get during contact sports! @brighty14 is an international futsal player - can't remember if he's a pumper though. Brighty?

    :)
     
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  11. raun01

    raun01 · Active Member

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    Referral generally takes more time. Keep in mind a six months window and yes it can be removed easily

    Best of luck
     
  12. brighty14

    brighty14 Type 1 · Active Member

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    I'm not currently a pumper @Snapsy but it could be on my agenda. After a revisit to the diabetes and sports clinic I may be on the case for. Having just gone through using the libre for the first time I learnt a lot !! Not sure how I managed without it before
     
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  13. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Me neither! It's fabulous!
    :)
     
  14. Dan87

    Dan87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Coming to the point where I need to state my preference to the DSN for which pump I would prefer, to then see if I get funding for it.

    Having done a lot of research my favourites at this moment in time seem to be:

    Medtronic Minimed 640G

    Plus points: Remote which doubles up as BGM, can get CGM if self-fund
    Negatives: CGM more expensive than Dexcom etc.

    Omnipod

    Plus points: Remote which doubles up as BGM, small patch (I exercise regularly - football mainly)
    Negatives: No CGM available

    Dana Diabecare R

    Plus points: Remote which doubles up as BGM, smallest/lightest of the tubed pumps, can control pump through app on phone
    Negatives: No CGM available, less popular than other pumps therefore less tested

    I'm put off the Accu-chek insight due to a few really bad reviews from others on here. Not totally against the accu-chek combo, however there is no CGM available and it doesn't have the benefit of being light and small like the Omnipod or the Dana. The Vibe gets good reviews but has no remote/BGM.

    Considering I play football twice a week (once competitively for 90 mins), should this be pushing me towards the Omnipod?

    Or, should CGM still be the dealbreaker?

    All help much appreciated,
    Dan
     
  15. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Oooooh exciting, @Dan87 !

    I don't have experience of any of your shortlisted pumps, so no advice to give! I love being a pumper, I love my pump (it's an Insight), and I'm sure that whichever pump you go for you will never look back!

    :):):)
     
  16. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    TBH I don't know, although the Pods can withstand knocks I'm not sure how one would cope in a heavy tackle say, that said if the Pod did come away you could always replace it during or after the match (as its always best to carry a spare pod when away from home).

    Good luck @Dan87
     
  17. Dan87

    Dan87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I never contemplated having spares, so if the pod got damaged it's not an expensive thing to replace? Whereas if I had a medtronic and it got damaged, that's thousands of pounds worth of damage, right?
     
  18. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    The cost of the Pods depend on the buying power of the NHS Trust concerned (so I was told), but I believe the cost of the Pods are roughly around £20 or below, if one was knocked off during a contact sport then you'd just replace it at no cost to yourself.

    Not sure about the cost of a Medtronic Pump or whether any damage to the pump would be covered by insurance whilst participating in a sport, hopefully other pump users will answer this for you.
     
  19. Seacrow

    Seacrow LADA · Active Member

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    My diabetes clinic asked me to make sure the pump (Medtronic 640g) was covered as a separate item on house insurance. Whether household insurance would cover damage caused by sporting activity is probably down to the insurance company, and worth asking them.
     
  20. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Most trusts will ask anyone with a pump to make sure it's insured. Check with your contents insurance that it can be added and what the deal would be if damaged during sport. Or there's an insulin pump insurance company for about £7.50 a month.

    I've used both an omnipod and a Medtronic 640. I really loved my omnipod, I'm not overly enamoured with the Medtronic. I think both have pluses and minuses for sport. With the Medtronic you've, obviously, got to be carrying round the pump with you, so you need to figure out a comfortable way to be carrying it round when playing. There's lots of pump belts around which should make that easy. With an omnipod you aren't carrying anything around, it's just stuck on so you don't need to think about it. Although you might need to think about where to site it so it's ok for sport, mine didn't much like being on my legs when I went for a run, and it fared better in my tummy if out in really cold weather - the pods can get too cold to work. Then the Medtronic, if you have the sensors, has a predictive low suspend feature where if it thinks you're going to hypo it will suspend insulin delivery - I think this works best for exercise.

    If you're thinking about an omnipod do ask to trial a dummy omnipod to see if you're happy with a pod stuck to you. And you should really ask the DSN to hold/touch/poke/press the buttons of/have a general fiddle with all of the pumps that you have to choose from. That should be the thing that helps you most in making the choice.
     
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