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Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Shucks, Jun 18, 2017.

  1. Shucks

    Shucks Prefer not to say · Member

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    So I signed up to a new doctor because of a house move 2 weeks ago, in the routine new patient check they noticed my blood pressure was a little elevated so last week ran some blood tests.

    I'm a 26yo steady healthy weight, no health complaints myself.

    Friday I was called in urgently in the morning and I spent most of Friday in the doctors having loads more tests done. My blood sugar is reading between 12 and 16 consistently with peaks and troughs -in the doctors app after breakfast I was at 19, and then I was down to 9 yesterday because I didn't get time to eat lunch. My next appointment is Weds but understandably the doc and nurse have told me not to worry too much - just keep testing and they'll work out a course of action.

    It's all so new and a massive shock - just want to meet people who've been through a similar thing. Sure once the doc has helped me steady the boat it'll sink in and I'll build a routine.

    Yeah. So I'm flabbergasted - anyone have a similar situation? The worst thing is the waiting as I don't know anything about what I'm dealin with yet, what medication or changes I'll need to make.

    On the lighter side they didn't have a small sharps bin so I had to take a massive yellow box home on the bus. Made me giggle!
     
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  2. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    One thing seems to be true. You have some insulin or your blood sugar readings would not reduce. You are in for an interesting time where you could change your lifestyle, take a lot of pills or possibly end up on insulin. Don't panic for the moment, all of the information isn't in yet.
     
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  3. Shucks

    Shucks Prefer not to say · Member

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    Thanks - yeah interesting seems the best way to take it. I'm looking forward to finding out what I need to do. Feel very much in limbo!
     
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  4. Philb69

    Philb69 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hiya
    Pretty much the same here. Diagnosed last friday. On tabs for high blood preassure and Metformin and still have to go for liver scan and eye test but i feel fine. Worst of all i am going on holiday tomorrow so can't really start to sort it out.

    Good luck
     
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  5. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Hi @Shucks & @Philb69 .

    Welcome to the forum, both of you!

    Going to tag in @daisy1 with a little info sheet.

    Guys? Feel free to ask any question you want. :)
     
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  6. Japes

    Japes Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum and hope things become a little clearer after the next appointment.

    I can sympathise with the circumstances - I was diagnosed the week I moved house, though it was at the old practice who were clear they wouldn't keep me on their lists as I was moving out of area, and I had to register pretty rapidly with the new practice. (Nurse fabulous, GPs less so...)
     
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  7. Sue_Cyprus_

    Sue_Cyprus_ Type 2 · Member

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  8. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    What's the sharps bin for?
     
  9. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    If you have to finger prick or have needles then that is where you put them for disposal.
     
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  10. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Ickihun,
    Some use them for disposing of blood extraction finger spikers. Since mine are invariably retracted after use I just bin them because I see broken glass put in a dustbin for our general waste bin as much more dangerous.
    regards
    Derek
     
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  11. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That 19 after breakfast is a bit worrying - if you are eating a lot of carbohydrate first thing then it might be advisable to change to something with fewer - yes your surgery might be working on it - but in the mean time you have like two to three teaspoons of sugar in your blood when you should only have one.
    The good thing is that your readings are not consistently high - and you don't report weightloss.
     
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  12. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    I only received a bin once I went on insulin injections. I guess all different now. That was 16yrs ago.
    I'm so out of touch how a new diagnosed diabetic is treated in the uk. I think I thought everyone was treated uniformly the same. Durrr! Nope.
    I hope @Shucks finds wednesday more informative. The nhs do know what they are doing just cannot carry every diabetic. A lot is up to yourself and use the tools the nhs give you and research on-line anything indepth. The diabetic nurse attached to the gp practices only receive basic training but enough for the newly diagnosed to start with. (Well mine is)
     
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  13. gavin86

    gavin86 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I had the same reaction.. everyone around me was aghast.. it still hasn't really made me upset. Just. Interesting like you say. I'm an expert at putting off thinking about the future though...
     
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  14. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Guru
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @Shucks

    Hello Shucks and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will answer.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  15. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    @gavin86 I felt alot better once on meds. I'd been ill on and off for under 30yrs with diabetic symptoms and gained so much weight I was morbidly obese.
    My diabetes is managed better but thankful due to my team, not just me struggling like when I was undiagnosed.
    I so appreciate the nhs.
     
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  16. Shucks

    Shucks Prefer not to say · Member

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    Thank you! This is all awesome. I had a HbA1C reading of high seventies, still reading 14-17 with outliers. Can't wait for Wednesday.
     
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  17. Shucks

    Shucks Prefer not to say · Member

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    Good positive stuff yes I agree. Trying not to panic just very much in the wilderness.
     
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  18. Shucks

    Shucks Prefer not to say · Member

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    You too. I have an ultrasound for liver and 'anything else unusual'. Enjoy your holiday. I'm at work this week and wish I wasn't so I could just get on with it all.
     
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  19. Shucks

    Shucks Prefer not to say · Member

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    Thank you that's very reassuring. I've been hitting 17 after meals so hope medication from Weds will help. Just a shock and a new world of things to think about that as of 1030 on Friday I didn't know very much at all about.

    End mope.
     
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  20. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Tablets are not going to help much with high blood glucose, you really need to lower your intake of carbs until you reach normal figures, otherwise it is going to mean a pretty dismal outcome.
     
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