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The likelihood of Type 1 Parent with Type 1 Child?

Discussion in 'Parents' started by zoflow, Oct 21, 2017.

  1. zoflow

    zoflow Type 1 · Member

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    Hi, I was only diagnosed with Type 1 in 2015 at age 36 after various tests confirmed the relevant antibodies in my blood. My son was born in 2010 and daughter in 2011 and I have become hyper-vigilant about the state of their pancreas since my diagnosis.
    Recently my son has been needing the toilet so very frequently; he has always been a thirsty child - preferring water over anything else (I was so proud of his innately wise choices as a toddler!) yet now I'm wondering whether these are all signs of Type 1 developing. Any other parents who have detected early signs of onset? I am also reading Dr. Berstein's Diabetes Solution and he puts the normal range between 3.8 and 5.3. My son's FBS was 6.1 and post meal reading (2hrs later) 5.6 .... alarm bells are ringing. Would appreciate hearing your experiences.
     
    #1 zoflow, Oct 21, 2017 at 8:09 PM
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2017
  2. Emily95

    Emily95 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If the mother is type 1 diabetic, there is a 1-4% chance the child will be type 1. If the father is type 1 diabetic there is a 4-8% chance the child will have type 1 diabetes. This is the same for each child you have, first child, second child, third child, the chance with each pregnancy is the same.
     
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  3. zoflow

    zoflow Type 1 · Member

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    thanks - I guess my real question is not likelihood, but searching for ways of early detection so as to preserve any remaining functioning beta cells.
     
  4. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  5. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm very much in the same position. My daughter has a fasting glucose of around 4.6 but is often still up in mid to high fives after two hours after a meal and to be honest she hardly eats. So I say meal but in practice I mean like half a hot cross bun and a banana. Hardly the meal of the century. She is way out of dr B's range of basically always being below 5. I can't help thinking it's a matter of time.

    I'm type 1, my dad is type 1, I'm just kind of waiting for it in my children.
     
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  6. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh and have a look at preventt1.org if you haven't already.
    My daughter is now on vitamin D and fish oil and DHA. Don't know if it helps but feel like I have to try something.
     
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  7. zoflow

    zoflow Type 1 · Member

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    @catapillar Thanks! looks awesome. been on site, but sadly being in South Africa, there are no locations near me. But will look for something similar here.
     
  8. zoflow

    zoflow Type 1 · Member

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    @ExtremelyW0rried... I so feel you. The responsibility feels huge to do all we can to prevent or at least delay. I will look at that link. Supplementation feels key. been having sprouted flaxseeds myself recently as it purportedly supports the beta cells. so will add to their meals too... feel a warm hug!
     
  9. novorapidboi26

    novorapidboi26 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have never actually thought about pro actively looking for ways to prevent my kids been diagnosed with type one...

    Is this something a lot of people do...?
     
  10. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You could try getting in touch via the contact us page on the trialnet site - https://www.diabetestrialnet.org/webapp/PreRegTracking/MoreInfo.aspx - I think they can/do just sent out a postal pack of instructions with what labs to run and these can be run by any lab & then, presumably, the results get sent to trialnet to interpret the risk. Well, any lab might be a bit optimistic, because generally I think antibody testing usually has to be done be specific labs, but there will be labs that can do this. Ask trialnet whether there is an option to receive a postal pack in s. Africa.
     
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  11. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well I'm giving it a go. It makes sense that autoimmune conditions are caused by inflammation so anti inflammatory supplements and foods might help. Note I said might. Also it is likely only a delay at best.
    Some of the families on prevent were involved with trialnet and have found they've dropped the number of antibodies they originally had since taking vitamin D, dha, omega 3 and green tea. Some have also cut out gluten. I don't know. If it isn't harming then I see nothing against giving it a try...
     
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  12. fletchweb

    fletchweb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't worry as that will not change anything. Also Bernstein's postulation is complete foolishness and likely designed to sell more books. Non diabetics BG range has a much wider variability than what Bernstein reports. The only way of knowing this variability would be to monitor all non-diabetics of all ages and ethnicity etc 7 - 24.

    Now having said that - whenever my kids were feeling ill, be it a cold or some other ailment I would test them. My son when he was 17 tested 8.9 once, I was concerned. Took him to the doctor where my son had an A1C and it was fine. He's now 26 and he's still fine. My doctor told me this occasionally happens ...

    On a similar note - I have type 1, my spouse doesn't and the kids both in their 20s don't have diabetes (one is very active - military, the other is not - University student) My 1st cousin and her spouse are both non-diabetic and yet both their kids have type 1.

    Basically there is much we don't know on the passing down of genetic mutations and if anyone tries to give you odds - they are either a genetic scientist who has just made a major discovery or they are just severely misinformed.

    Anyway - I would suggest what I did - if your kids seem sick - bad cold, flu ... whatever. Test them - if they read in the 8s more than once take them in to get checked out, possibly get an A1c if at all possible.

    Good Luck!
     
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  13. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    This is a very sensible point. The tight targets some people with diabetes impose upon themselves do not, in actual fact reflect what is perfectly normal blood sugar readings to see in a non diabetic.

    Don't be tempted to use an out of your target blood sugar reading to impute a diagnosis.


    There are identified gene markers that create a known and quantifiable risk of developing type 1. Children with the specific high risk genotype and a family history have a 1 in 5 chance of getting type 1, that is just the odds and they are odds that have indeed been reported on by genetic scientists since at least 2011, possibly more like 1996 - http://clinchem.aaccjnls.org/content/57/2/176


    But, realistically, I don't think anyone is mapping anyone's genome to determine their risk of type 1, simply because it is well recognised that is more than just genetic, you can have all the genes that predispose you to type 1 and still not get it. One identical twin can have type 1, there's only a 50% chance the other one will get it, and unless they are being raised in some sort of parent trap style split I can only assume identical twins are going to be being exposed to very similar environments.

    What they do use to determine risk of type 1 is antibody testing because normal people (I'm going to have to think of a new phrase for this, I'm normal, I swear) don't have the antibodies. So if you have an antibody, or several, then your risk of developing type 1 can be quantified. This is what trialnet testing does and if trail net testing shows you are antibody positive and high risk of developing type 1 then a close eye is kept on blood sugar levels for early diagnosis, before a blue light DKA situation can happen, and so if clinical trials of early treatments are happening they can be offered participation in the trials to see if they offer any success in staving off the autoimmune attack or extending beta cell function.
     
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  14. zoflow

    zoflow Type 1 · Member

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    thanks so much - that is great to hear. Love the story of your kids and your cousin's - just so perfectly depicts how we can't really predict it, but I'm hoping to do my best to give his little pancreas a fighting chance like going dairy, gluten and sugar-free. But that's a whole other challenge, but they're warming up to it!
    I guess Bernstein's argument that his experience in his practice is that those with only slightly above his range of glucose levels still develop diabetic related complications. And I'm pretty keen to avoid as many complications for myself and do as much as I can for my kids to avoid them too... as much as I can. Also acknowledging I cannot control everything as much as I would Love to! this has all been so helpful. thank you.
     
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  15. zoflow

    zoflow Type 1 · Member

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    also...wondering regarding what you have generally fed/feed your kids... I've come across amazing research on the efficacy of raw milk in boosting the immune system. Did you ever include this in their diet?
     
  16. fletchweb

    fletchweb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    When my kids were young living at home we basically had a non processed, home cooked low carb-ish meals - not all the time but most of the time. My son seemed to have issues with whole milk but could handle skim so he drank that. As well. my spouse breast fed both kids right up until they were 4 yrs old. As the kids are 2 years apart she ended up breast feeding for almost 6 straight years. I must say it made my job easier and it didn't seem to hurt the kids. (my spouse's breasts seemed to fair okay too ) ...
     
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