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Carb counting

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by LondonKiwi, Mar 21, 2010.

  1. LondonKiwi

    LondonKiwi · Member

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    Hello

    As A newly diagnosed Tyoe 2 I'm a bit confused about the carb counting. I am not sure what I should be looking at or really understand the figures.

    If something has x amount of carbs how does that relate to y amount of sugar?

    Could someone give me an overview of what I should be looking at?

    Thamks
    Martin
     
  2. Debloubed

    Debloubed Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Martin,

    In simple, non scientific terms, if you are counting carbs then you should be counting the total carb content, not just the sugar portion. So, if a food has 50g carbs then count the full 50g, not just the 15g which sugars (for example!).

    Good luck :D
     
  3. Dennis

    Dennis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Further to the previous answer, food labels generally give the carb and sugar content. If it says "20g carb, of which 8g sugar" what this means is that, out of the 20g, 8g will convert into blood sugar within seconds. The other 12g will convert into blood sugar but slower. Just how slow will depend on the glycemic index (GI) of the item. If it has a high GI then it will convert into BS quickly, usually in around 10 to 15 minutes. If it has a low GI then it could take up to 2 hours to convert to blood sugar.

    It is because of this that foods with a low GI are generally reckoned to be better for diabetics, because your blood won't get spiked with a sudden increase in blood sugar that your body's insulin won't be able to cope with. Even better if you can try to cut right down on the carbohydrates as well as making sure that those you do eat are low GI.
     
  4. acron^

    acron^ · Well-Known Member

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    Regarding carbs, am I right in thinking you subtract any fibre content?
     
  5. cocacola

    cocacola Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  6. ally5555

    ally5555 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi - no you do not subtract the fibre in the UK

    The carb and fat bible is a much better book as it has been compiled by dietitians - I am not sure who put the collins book together or if it is accurate

    allyx
     
  7. dollydreamer

    dollydreamer Type 2 · Active Member

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    hi
    can you tell me about how much carb should i be eating a day, if i want to be low carbing and weight reducing and have type 2
    thanks
     
  8. acron^

    acron^ · Well-Known Member

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    Can you shed more light on this? Why not in the UK?
     
  9. ally5555

    ally5555 · Well-Known Member

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    In the UK fibre is not added to the total CHO as it is not digestible . It is listed as total fibre anyway"

    In the US they add the fibre in the total carbs!

    Hope that makes sense

    ally
     
  10. Dennis

    Dennis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ally is absolutely right, but watch out for where the food comes from. Many US manufactored foods sold in Europe are labelled "US style" where the carbs amount includes fibre. If the food is manufactured in the UK or elsewhere in Europe then the carbs value has already had the fibre deducted.
     
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